Skip to main content

Full text of "The independent film & video monthly"

See other formats


JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1 999 A Publication of The Foundation for Independent Video and Film www.aivf.org 




X%* 





S3.95 us $5.25 can 



l 7AA70 ll 801H 



1 



MM M M M at 

Hal Hartley 

Joins the Digital Revolution 



Dogma 99 

' The Facts in B&W 

The Sundance Channel 

P.J. Harvey as Magdelena in Hal Hartley's The Book of Life 










Select from the greatest sources on the planet! 

Over 30,000 hours of historic footage 

and musical performance clips. 

Transferred, databased, copyright-cleared 

and instantly available! 



A Century of Images 



fcTiTrfiTi 




AMERICANA • COMMERCIALS 

CONTEMPORARY NEWS • NEWSREELS 

VINTAGE TELEVISION • BEAUTY SHOTS 

WILDLIFE • NATURE • COMMERCIALS 

ROCK & ROLL • SLAPSTICK 

JAZZ & BLUES • COUNTRY & WESTERN 

HOLLYWOOD FEATURES 



STOCK FOOTAGE LIBRARY 

Call For Free Demo Reel • 1-800-249-1940 • 516-329-9200 • 516-329-9260 fax 
www.historicfilms.com • info@historicfilms.com 

FOX MOVIETONE NEWS OUTTAKES • ASSOCIATED PRESS TV • ED SULLIVAN SHOW 

STEW ALLEN SHOW • ALAN LOxMAX COLLECTION • SOUNDSTAGE • BEAT CLUB/MUSIKLADEN 

GRAND OLE OPRY STARS OF THE FIFTIES • UNIVERSAL NEWS • ^METROPOLITAN ENTERTAINMENT 

LAST OF THE WILD • STUDIO 54 LIBRARY • THE BIG PICTURE • PATHE NEWS, INC. 

AND NUMEROUS OTHER EXCLUSIVE COLLECTIONS 



I 

IE 
I 



11)12 



D IV 
1 E 



r 



• 



) 






2D IE 

2.1 ; 



n bJ!Dl":4D 






DIE 4 



12)12 

; 

1124 
2D 

U 

1 i r • a n 

D4 * c 4j 
IDl 

?< 24 

!•< I D. , 4 



33 



.) , 






2DI . 

e- d::di 
i 



E 4 E 
12)12 



u 



[! 

i] 

It 



*D 

■ 
)I . DI Dl 



I 2 



I t ) I E 






) < ° 



\ 



j J 
2 

4 D D 
hi I 



2 2 
D ID 
I >I 



; 






4 4 



did; t * 1 4 



UTOTT 

EDITBOX 

MAGNUM 

SUITE 



THE FASTEST, BIGGEST, MOST POWERFUL ONLINE EDITING SYSTEM 

HAS ARRIVED AT DuART. QUANTEL'S EDITBOX MAGNUM FEATURES 4 HOURS OF 
NON-LINEAR, NON-COMPRESSED D1 STORAGE FOR UNCOMPROMISED QUALITY AND 
SPEED. ASSEMBLE AND REFINE YOUR LONG-FORMAT PROJECTS IN A FRACTION OF 
THE TIME AND COST OF A TRADITIONAL SUITE. 




SUPER-FAST EDL AUTOCONFORMING 
PAINT + MOTION TRACKING 



REAL-TIME DVE 

INTEGRATED EDITOR, MULTI-LAYERED 
EFFECTS + COLOR CORRECTION 



^. 



DuArt film and video I the latest technology tor maximum creativity 

245 WEST 55TH ST NEW YORK, NY 10019 
T:80052DUART F:2127S7S774 E: SALFSflHUABT.COM 



^Independent 

M B FILM &VBEO MONTHLY 



Publisher: Ruby Lerner/EI izabeth Peters 

Editor in Chief: Patricia Thomson 
leditor@aivf.orgl 

Managing Editor: Paul Power 
lmdependent@aivf.org] 

Listings Editor: Scott Castle 
lfestivals@aivf.org] 

Contributing Editors: Lissa Gibbs, Gary 0. Larson, Barbara 
Bliss Osborn, Rob Rownd, Robert L. Seigel, Esq. 

Design Director: Daniel Christmas 
lstartree@xsite.netl 

Advertising Director: Laura D. Davis 

(212)807-1400x225; 

ldisplayads@aivf.org] 

Advertising Rep: Scott Castle 

(212)807-1400x233; 

lscott@aivf.org] 



Articles from The Independent are archived online at 
lwww.elibrary.com] 

• 

National Distribution: Total Circulation 

(Manhattan) (201) 342-6334; 

Ingram Periodicals (800) 627-6247 

Printed in the USA by Cadmus Journal Services 

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: 
The Independent Film & Video Monthly, 304 Hudson St., NY, NY 10013. 

The Independent Film & Video Monthly (ISSN 0731-5198) is published monthly 
except February and September by the Foundation tor Independent Video and Film 
(FIVF), a nonprofit, tax-exempt educational foundation dedicated to the promotion of 
video and film. Subscription to the magazine ($55/yr individual; $3 5/yr student; 
$75/yr library; $100/yr nonprofit organization; $150/yr business/industry) is 
included in annual membership dues paid to the Association of Independent Video 
and Filmmakers (AIVF), the national trade association of individuals involved in 
independent film and video, 304 Hudson St., NY, NY 10013, (212) 807-1400, fax 
(212) 463-8519; independent@aivf.org; wwwaivf.org 
Periodical Postage Paid at New York, NY. and at additional mailing offices. 

Publication of The Independent is made possible in part with public funds from the 
New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, and the National Endowment for 
the Arts, a federal agency. Publication of any advertisement in The Independent does 
not constitute an endorsement AIVF/FIVF are not responsible for any claims made in 
an ad. 

Letters to The Independent should be addressed to the editor. Letters may be edited 
for length All contents are copynght of the Foundation for Independent Video and Film, 
Inc. Reprints require written permission and acknowledgement of the article's previ- 
ous appearance in The Independent. The Independent is indexed in the Alternative 
Press Index. 

© Foundation for Independent Video & Rim, Inc. 1999 

AIVF/FIVF staff: Elizabeth Peters, executive director; Michelle Coe. information ser- 
vices director, LaTnce Dixon, membership/advocacy associate; Eugene Hernandez, 
webmaster; Jodi Magee, development consultant; Vallery Moore, membership direc- 
tor; Marya Wethers, membership assistant. 

AIVF/FIVF legal counsel Robert I. Freedman, Esq., Leavy, Rosensweig & Hyman 

AIVF/FIVF Board of Directors: Todd Cohen*. Lorn Ding (co-president), Barbara 
Hammer, Elizabeth Pete-'- (ex officio), Graham Leggat. Peter Lewnes, Richard 
Linklater, Cynthia Lopez*, J McKay, Diane Markrow (secretary), Laala Mafias*, 
Robb Moss (chair), Robert Ril -: (treasured, James Schamus*, Barton Weiss (co- 
president), Susan Wittenberg (v. ,e president). * RVf Board of Directors only 




Features 



26 

There's been a rash of black-and-white films recently. Here's a look at the pros and cons of 
shooting in monochrome. BY Lynn Ermann 

30 PigjtaJ. Video: C7s&*x:li *.Tx.c IWswg 

Digital video is not just on the horizon; it's here. Hal Hartley and Todd Verow are two filmmak 
ers who have put DV to good use. BY EUGENE HERNANDEZ 

33 Checlsuig: out I^iXxxx. -virith Video 

Libraries used to be a welcoming home for independent media, before education budgets were 
slashed. Now, it's still possible to sell your work to libraries — if you know how. 

by Steve Montgomery 

Inspired by Lars von Trier and Thomas Vinterberg's controversial Dogma 95, The Independent 
invited a number of cutting- edge directors to write their own Vows. 

by Jan Anania, Matthew Harrison, Lynn Hershmann- 
Leeson, Scott King, Christopher Munch, Tommy Pallotta, 
Esther Robinson, Lance Weiler, Stefan Avalos, Britta 
Sjogren, and Cauleen Smith 



2 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



Upfront 



F.A.Q. & Info 



Publishers' Notes 
Letters 



9 News 

Sundance Cinemas breaks ground for its first theaters; Sunny Side of 
the Doc announces three new initiatives; BET becomes a new source 
for production funding for black directors; the National Latino 
Communications Center and the CPB. 

by Anthony Kaufman, Bethany Hayes, Rita 
Michel, Mark J. Huisman 

16 Festival Circuit 

Reviews of the Hot Springs Documentary Festival, Virginia Film 
Festival, Hamptons International Film Festival, ResFest, and Short 
Film Festival of Mexico City. 

by Tim Schwab, Pat Aufderheide, Scott 
Castle, Ryan Deussing, Mary Sutter 



41 Distributor JT\.A..«Gfc. 

In the 12 months since rising from the ashes of LIVE Entertainment, 
Artisan Entertainment has grown into a serious contender among 
theatrical distributors. BY LlSSA GlBBS 

44 Funder F. A.Cfc. 

The Jerome Foundation is profiled in the debut of this new 
monthly column on funders. BY MICHELLE COE 

46 Festivals 

50 Notices 

56 Classifieds 



@AIVF 



60 Events 

64 Salons 

65 Trade Discounts 



Cover: RJ. Harvey as 
Magdalena in Hal 
Hartley's digital 
biblical fable, The 
Book of Life. Opposite: 
Harvey with Martin 
Donovan as Jesus. 

Courtesy Steve 
Hamilton 




The Sundance Channel has recently been revamped, adding four 
new series to its thematic programming strands. 

by Shelley Gabert 



fahce 

Eh a 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 3 



^WTWffffffgffff^ 



A Note of Farewell 

Dear AIVF members and Independent readers: 

As you may already know, after six years I'm 
leaving AIVF to head up a brand new founda- 
tion that will provide financial and promotion- 
al support to innovative artists' projects in the 
media, performing, and visual arts. It is such an 
exciting development for the arts field that I 
couldn't say no. 

One of my last official acts as publisher of 
The Independent is to proudly introduce this 
redesign of the magazine. We've been working 
on these changes for the past year, and we're 
very excited about the magazine's new look. 
The reconceived departments and sections 
make the magazine easier to read and utilize as 
a reference. You will also notice a new synergy 
between what's in the magazine and our activi- 
ties both in-house and on-line. 

Under Patricia Thomson's extraordinary 
leadership, The Independent has grown from an 
average of 44 pages to 68 pages. We have intro- 
duced regional spotlights and experimental 
issues; we added distributor profiles, which 
have become one of the most widely read fea- 
tures, and with this issue, we are adding hinder 
profiles as well. Both advertising and newsstand 
sales more than doubled during my six years 
here. The magazine is constantly evolving, and 
I have continued to be increasingly proud of it. 

While I'm sad to be leaving, I want you to 
know what a privilege it's been to be at AIVF 
these past six years, and how wonderful it's 
been to get to know and work with so many of 
you. There are so many achievements in which 
we can all take pride. A few highlights for me 
are: the creation of the Millennium Campaign 
Fund, now more than 60 percent of the way to 
its $150,000 goal; our wonderful office space, 
which has truly become a community resource; 
the development of the AIVF Salon Network, 
with more than 1 50 events a yearl in more than 
20 communities nationwide, and now involving 
more than 1,000 people; the evolution of our 
website [www.aivf.org] into what will eventual- 
ly be a comprehensive information resource for 
the field; the publication of two new self-distri- 
bution resources; the establishment of Reel NY, 
an annual series of independent work on 
WNET, now in its fourth year; and our advo- 
cacy partnership with Libraries for the Future. 

There are many challenges ahead. Perhaps 
there is no greater challenge than that of 
reclaiming the idea of "independence" at a 
moment when its meaning has become so con- 
fused. John Cassavetes said it well: 

I didn t choose to he an independent, but I do like being 
my own buss. 1 liave no respect for people who ask for 
freedom but don't reAly want it . . . I've kiwwn a lot 



of filmmakers who started out with enormous talents 
and lost momeritum. I don't say they're sellirig out, but 
somehow if you fight the system, you're going to lose to 
it. In my mind, if you fight the system, it only means 
you want to join it ... You have to have your own 
values. You have to want to make your own picture. 
You have to have your own image of making a picture, 
otherwise you're no help to anyone or to yourself . . . 
The idea of making a film today is to package a life- 
time of emotion and idea into two hours where some 
images flash across the screen, and in that two hours 
the hope is diat the audience will forget everything and 
that celluloid will cliange lives. Now that's insane, 
that's a preposterously presumptuous assertion, and 
yet, that's the hope of every filmmaker. " 

There are many makers who still believe in 
the power of independent media to change 
lives, not just create careers. It is those makers 
who will help to redefine and reclaim the field. 

AIVF and The Independent will be at the 
center of this work as well. I could not be more 
delighted to pass the torch to Elizabeth Peters. 
I have known and worked with Elizabeth 
throughout her tenure as managing director of 
the Austin Film Society. She is tenacious, a 
really hard worker, deeply knowledgeable about 
the field, and passionately committed to 
AIVF's unique role within it. 

I know that you will offer Elizabeth and the 
conscientious AIVF staff and board the same 
generous support you have given me. 

Thank you again for a great six years. 

Ruby Lemer, outgoing AIVF executive 
director and publisher of The Independent 



Greetings, AIVF 

Dear AIVF members and Independent readers: 

In January I will join AIVF as executive direc- 
tor: which means that as you read this I will be 
in medias re, learning the ins and outs of man- 
aging the organization while grappling with the 
considerable task of following someone for 
whom there is no replacement. Ruby Lerner 
has achieved remarkable things for AIVF over 
her tenure. As an advocate for independents, 
she has been a veritable force of nature; as a 
director, Ruby leaves AIVF in a state of stabili- 
ty that is rare among nonprofits. 

But as I write these words, it is October. I am 
in Austin, Texas, immersed in teaching a 16mm 
film class, leading a university internship pro- 
gram, beginning to sort through my life and 
imagine how I will possibly pack up and move 
to the big city. In the back of my mind resides a 
growing awareness of how much more I need to 
learn about AIVF, its programs, and con- 
stituents. The prospect of leading this organiza- 
tion into the next millennium is alternately 



thrilling and terrifying. 

For the past three years I have served as 
managing director of the Austin Film Society 
(AFS), during which time I oversaw a period of 
enormous growth. In 1995 AFS inaugurated a 
variety of artists' services while expanding our 
exhibition programs and formalizing a year- 
round weekly Free Cinema series. Perhaps most 
visibly we developed the Texas Filmmakers' 
Production Fund, an annual direct grant for 
film and video artists initiated to redress the 
vacuum left by the loss of the NEA regional 
regrants program in 1994- Although the TFPF 
and the excellence of AFS film series have gar- 
nered national attention, no less important is 
the work that AFS does day-to-day, assisting 
artists and developing collaborative partner- 
ships with community organizations. 

I initially came to Texas to attend graduate 
school and earn an MFA in production; since 
doing so I have taught a number of production 
classes for the University of Texas Department 
of RTF, served on myriad committees, and 
coordinated the undergraduate internship pro- 
gram. Between semesters I have picked up posi- 
tions on feature films, working my way through 
the editing department from PA to Avid assis- 
tant. 

My prior experience ranges from composit- 
ing type and stripping negatives (in the days 
before desktop publishing) to preparing equip- 
ment packages for checkout to singing for a 
Velvet Underground cover band. I have experi- 
ence managing everything from a print shop to 
an organic farmers' cooperative to independent 
film productions. The synthesis of these dis- 
parate experiences positions me well to under- 
stand the varied needs of the AIVF communi- 
ty of independents. 

This is a remarkable time in our field. 
Already we have seen incredible advances in 
the technologies of photography and informa- 
tion dissemination that make video and film 
affordable and accessible to a greater body of 
artists. The devastating loss of much of the 
public funding for the media arts has been par- 
tially offset by the energy of a new generation of 
indie producers and their d.i.y. aesthetic. In the 
midst of all this excitement and reorientation, 
AIVF's mission is as relevant as ever. A con- 
certed, broad-reaching, collective presence 
continues to be critical to keep access to the 
tools for media literacy, production, and distri- 
bution available to independent artists. 

So as executive director of the organization, 
my personal challenge will be to keep the orga- 
nization just as it is: only more so. AIVF is an 
essential national resource, and I will be hon- 
ored to serve as its custodian. 

Elizabeth Peters, incoming AIVF executive 
director and Independent publisher 



4 I fl E ! N E P E N D h T January/February 1999 



tfE 



£ 



J*«- 



:#" N ^.'V 



Nobody has the 20th Century covered with news footage like ABCNEWS VideoSource! 

7 '^kJ 




" *~HH Y^^"* 3 "'^^' 


"— . 


k 


\ 


k*^V irt ■ ^ _^_- 


* 







I 



ro 






From the turn of the century to its approaching 
climax, the historical events that have shaped our 
times are mere fingertips away. 

Your Source for the 20th Century! 

Nobody in the footage business has as much 
news footage as ABCNews VideoSource! We've combined 
three of the world's finest news and stock footage 
collections - ABC News, Worldwide Television News, 






and British Movietone News - at America's newest 
and most modern footage resource. If it happened from 
1900 right up to today, we've got it covered! 

The great thing is, it's all so easy to access. 
Just click us up on the Web or, even better, come visit 
our fantastic facility in person. Our highly-skilled 
and footage-sawy Customer Service Representatives 
will simplify your search. It's footage searching the 
way it should be! 



For the fastest, easiest way to find 
the exact footage you want, come to the Source! 

©ABCNEWS 

VideoSource 

125 West End Avenue at 66th Street • New York, NY 10023 
800 • 789 • 1250 • 212 • 456 • 5421 • FAX 212 • 456 • 5428 

Visit http://www.abcnewsvsource.com 



©1998 



IV I I 1 1 G 




% ; 










/ 



WRITE . SHOOT . DIRECT . EDIT 

YOUR OWN SHORT FILMS IN OUR HANDS-ON EIGHT WEEK 
INTENSIVE TOTAL IMMERSION PROGRAMS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH 

LITTLE OR NO PRIOR FILMMAKING EXPERIENCE. 

WORK WITH 16MM ARRIFLEX CAMERAS IN SMALL CLASS DESIGNED 

AND TAUGHT BY AWARD - WINNING INSTRUCTORS. Tuition $4,000. 



NEW WORKSHOPS START THE FIRST MONDAY 
OF EVERY MONTH IN NEW YORK CITY ALL YEAR ROUND. 



NEW YORK PRINCETON UNIVERSITY* YALE UNIVERSITY * UCLA* 

PARIS, FRANCE * CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY, ENGLAND * VENICE, ITALY * 
* SUMMER WORKSHOPS LOCATION - FOUR, SIX AND EIGHT WEEK. 
All workshops are solely owned and operated by the New York Film Academy 



NEW yCPK f IL/H ACADEMy 

100 EAST 17TH STREET NEW YORK CITY 10003 TEL: 212-674-4300 FAX: 212-477-1414 
:■;,; WEB PAGE: www.nyfa.com E-MAIL: film@nyfa.com 



6 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



LETTERS 



To the editor, 

Thanks so much to The Independent and Richard 
Baimbridge for the article on me and my film 
SlamNation ["Talking Heads," November 1998]. 
I do want to clarify one point, though: Marc 
Levin filmed all the Washington D.C. prison 
footage for the tape that pitched the concept of 
Slam. I contributed performance footage of Saul 
Williams from SlamNation and had the pleasure 
of working with Marc on the edit of Slam's pitch 
tape. 

Paul Devlin 
Producer/director, SlamNation 



To the editor: 

Mark J. Huisman's article "docfest Debuts" 
[October 1998) highlighted the success of the 
New York International Documentary Film 
Festival which premiered last May. Huisman's 
glowing review, however, neglected one of 
docfest's leading men, program director, David 
Leitner. I attended many of the films at docfest 
and consistently was impressed by the program 
design. Leitner moderated insightful discussions 
with each filmmaker, edited the festival cata- 
logue (a wonderful collection of reviews), and 
selected a wide array of films, many of which may 
never have been seen by a New York audience 
Clearly the success of such a provocative festiva 
relies on the spirit and energy of its founders 
Given Leitner's orchestration of the docfest pro- 
gram, Huisman's article singing its praises needed 
an additional refrain. 

Christianna P Hannum 
Director/producer, Swim Pictures, New York 

Letters to the editor can be sent to editor(g)aivf.org 



www.aivf.org 



(a> 



The Independent isn't the only new-look aspect 

of AIVF — check out our redesigned and 

info-packed website 



Archive makes if easy ro ger your daily 

requiremenf of sarisfying sHIls and fempfing film clips. Wifh over 1 4,000 hours 

of sfock foofage and 20,000,000 hisforical phofos, we've gof all fhe ingredienfs for your nexf film, 

mulfimedia, or prinf projecf. Cafaloged, copyrighf-cleared and ready for you ro use. Many images 

are already available in digital formal. So give us a call and lef's gef cookin'! 





^ 

/* 



M£5Tt»fc?*J 



<3SEX*i!S 



V 



*7 ii 

■ 




Fax us on your letterhead for 

a free brochure and sample reel. 

And check ouf our on-line database: 

www.archivefilms.CDm 



Archive 


TM 

Films 


Archive 1 


3 HOTOS 




Your One Call To History: 
.800-876-5115 






4t 



P 




53D W. 25th Street, Dept. IND, New York, NY 1DDD1 Tel. (212) 822-78DD Fax (212) 645^2137 

; 



The Independent Feature Project 
in association with the 
Writers Guild of America, East presents 

FROM SCRIPT 
TO SCREEN 

A conference on screenplay development 

April 9-11 , 1 999 




IFP 



Fashion Institute of Technology, New York City 



For a brochure and application form call the Independent Feature Project at (212) 465 8244 ext: 801 
or download from IndieLink, IFP's website www.ifp.org. after March 1, 1999. 



Sponsored by 



[VOICE 



Judge Us By the: 

Collections 

"We Keep 




Smithsonian 

INSTITI'TION 

The film collection 
from the great cultural 
institution's Office of 
Jelecommunications. 



Panthbra 
Prodttc tions 

400 hours of film 
from this Emmy 
award winning 
production company. 




New York • Paris • Tokyo 
Barcelona • Tel Aviv 
Hong Kong • Stockholm 
Seoul • Stuttgart • Osaka 



Aviation 



Hearst 

Historical 

One of the premier 
historical collections 
doting bock to the 
turn of the century. 



Pan Am 

Collection 

Jravelogues, industrials, 
commercials, and 
aviation history from 
1928-1980. 




500 

Nations 

Incredible scenic 
beauty from the epic 
CBS miniseries hosted 
by Kevin Costner. 



Wescam 

Incredible perspectives 
from the manufacturer 
of the world's most 
advanced camera mount. 



call hi free Demo: 

I i:i.: (2 1 2) 799-9 1 OO 

pax (2X2)799-9258 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST LIBRARY FOR CONTEMPORARY & ARCHIVAL STOCK FOOTAGE 



DOES YOUR LIBRARY 

HAVE THE 

INDEPENDENT? 

Take this coupon to your 
school or public librarian and 
request a subscription today! 

10 issues/yr. 

Library subscription rate $75 

($90 foreign) 

Published by the Foundation for 

Independent Video and Film 

ISSN 0731-0589 

Order from FIVF, 

304 Hudson St., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10013; 

(212) 807-1400 x235; info@aivf.org 

EBSCO: (205) 991-6600 

fax: (205) 991-1479 

Faxon (US): (800) 283-2966; 

(Can) (519) 472-1005 
Can fax: (519) 472-1072 



Order these books from FTVF 

Liquidation Special on ATVF/FIVF books 
The ATVF/FIVF Guide to International 
Film & Video Festivals 

Kathryn Bowser, ed. $17 $ 

The ATVFIFTVF Guide to Film & 

Video Distributors Kathryn Bowser, ed. $12 $_ 

The Next Step: A Film and Video Distribution 
Handbook 

Morrie Warshawski, ed. $12 $ 

Order all three and save! $30 $ 

Alternative Visions Distributing Independent 
Video in a Home Video World by Debra Franco; 
$9.95 AIVF members; $12.95 others $_ 

Film and Video Financing 

Michael Wiese; $22.95 $_ 

Film Directing Shot by Shot: Visualizing 

from Concept to Screen Steven D. Katz; $24.95 $_ 

Home Video: Producing for the Home Market 

Michael Wiese; $11.95 $_ 

The Independent Film & Videomakers Guide 

Michael Wiese; $13.95 $_ 

Production Assistant Guidelines 

by Sandy Curry; $6.00 $_ 

Postage/handling: US - $3.50 1st book, $1.00 ea. addl 
Foreign - $5.00 1st book, $1 .50 ea. addl $_ 

Total $. 



Make checks payable to FIVF, 304 Hudson St., 6th Fl., 
NY, NY 10013; or charge by phone: (212) 807-1400 
x235; fax: (212) 463-8519, info@aivf.org 



Look for our new self-distribution resource 
books coming soon! 



XtfEWS 



EDITED BY PAUL POWER 

EXHIBITION 

SUNDANCE 
SEATS UP 

New Cinema Chain 
Finally Breaks Ground 

After over a year of waiting, Robert Redford 
has finally made good on his promise to open an 
independent theater chain under the Sundance 
banner. Sundance Cinemas, a joint venture with 
75-year-old exhibition giant General Cinema 
Theatres, begins construction in January on its 
first theater, which is due to be completed before 
the end of the year. Located in University City, 
adjacent to the University of Pennsylvania in 
Philadelphia, the arthouse venue plans to exhib- 
it "only independent and other specialty films," 
according to the cinemas. 

At a press conference in October, Redford 
called the Philadelphia area location "an ideal 
choice, and we look forward to our collaboration 
with Penn." Although not explicitly noted by 
Redford, college populations are a common tar- 
get audience for independent films. University of 
Pennsylvania president Judith Rodin gave her full 
support to the project and a willingness to work 
with Redford and Sundance Cinemas. "We 
explored a number of options for this prime loca- 
tion adjacent to our campus," said Rodin, "and 
we felt that the Sundance Cinema concept was 
the strongest and most creative we could imag- 
ine." 

Redford also commented that the university 
site "is a great model for integrating ourselves 
into local communities in a way that will 
enhance both Sundance Cinemas and the cultur- 
al life of the cities in which we will be located." 
Other cities slated for Sundance Cinemas 
include Portland, Oregon, which was announced 
last August, Chicago, and Boston, all cities noted 
for their high student populations. Additionally, 
Redford noted his wishes to bring independent 
film to "communities where it already exists, as 
well as in places where the audience exists, but 
the theaters don't." 

Although Redford claimed that "no two 
Sundance Cinemas will be alike," the planned 
Penn theater will be a good standard by which to 
judge the scope of the project. According to 
General Cinema Theatres President and CEO 
Bill Doeren, the first theater in the proposed 




chain will be a state-of-the-art, multiple-screen 
complex in excess of 40,000 square feet, which 
will include stadium seating, digital sound, a 
restaurant, and an outdoor garden cafe. Doeren 
also added, "The cinema will also have other 
space where a range of special events and com- 
munity gatherings can take place." 

"Our goal is twofold," outlined Redford. "To 
create Sundance Cinema centers which will 
serve artists by expanding the opportunity for 
their work to be seen, and to provide audiences 
the chance to see fresh and original films and 
enjoy other cultural experiences." 

In his announcement, Redford also noted that 
independent film has been the fastest growing 
segment of the U.S. box office over the past five 
years. With this increased interest in specialty 
films, Redford sees the Sundance chain as a "log- 
ical extension of our efforts over the past 18 years 
to expand the opportunities for independent 
filmmakers to reach the broadest possible audi- 
ence." 

What films will get screened at Sundance 
Cinemas? The theater promises to showcase a 
full range of independent film programming with 
an emphasis on leading American independent 
films, but will also offer foreign films, documen- 
taries, and "other cutting-edge films which tradi- 
tionally have had a limited opportunity for the- 
atrical release." The announcement also indicat- 
ed that films from the Sundance Festival could 
also be showcased. 

Anthony Kaufman 

Ant/ion^ Kaufman is features editor of indiewire.com 



DOCS 

SUNNY SIDE GIVES 

DEBUT DIRECTORS A 

LEG UP 

Since its inception in 1990, France's Sunny 
Side of the Doc documentary market and confer- 
ence has been a pioneering force in internation- 
al factual film production and distribution. Five 
years ago, it launched the terrifically popular 
Ateliers de Co-production (Co-production 
Workshops), where producer-director teams 
meet face-to-face with a panel of commissioning 
editors to pitch their projects. 

In 1998 the market and the festival, Vue sur 
les Docs (held in September instead of June to 
steer clear of World Cup fever), launched two 
new initiatives, 'Premieres' and 'Side by Side', as 
well as significantly altering existing activities. 

In its 1998 edition, Sunny Side joined Vue Sur 
les Docs in kicking off 'Premieres', a new prize 
category within the competition dedicated to 
first films by new filmmakers. By highlighting 
quality new work, the festival is bidding to 
become a breeding ground for new talent and 
Sunny Side is providing the nitty-gritty commer- 
cial support. Beyond prize money (a token 
lO.OOOFF— $1,750— for 'Premieres') and an air- 
ing on a major network for the main competition 
winners, all directors whose films are selected for 
the section are taken under the Sunny Side wing. 
They're then put in contact with commissioning 



January/February f 999 THE INDEPENDENT 9 



**** 



ATTENTION**** 



niM Sk VIDEC PRODUCERS 




ERRORS & OMISSIONS 
INSURANCE 



ONE TIME PREMIUM 



COVERS YOUR PRODUCTION 



ANNUAL RENEWAL NOT NECESSARY 



1-800-638-8791 




INSURANCE BROKERS 



P.O. BOX 128, CLINTON, MD 20735 
WWW.WALTERRY.COM 



editors and programmers 
attending the market, and 
their films are made avail- 
able for viewing at the 
videotheque, the market's 
permanent video screening 
room. 

Back on the purely mar- 
ket side, the Ateliers de Co- 
production have mutated 
into three different produc- 
er/director-friendly activi- 
ties — 'Trendy Side of Co- 
Production', 'Meeting 
around Co-Production' and 
'Side by Side' — the last two 
being an expansion of the Ateliers de Co-pro- 
duction. 

Sunny Side's general director Olivier Masson 
explains that Trendy Side of Co-Production looks 
at countries or regions (France, Germany, UK, 
and Scandinavia this year) and lets programmers 
present their current production tendencies and 
scheduling needs. "In these sessions, we focused 
specifically on projects that had real merit but 
were problematic for one reason or another: their 
content, the way they approached a particular 
subject, even the technical means or the format 
of the film, anything that might make it hard to 
get it financed and aired, and the broadcasters 
suggested ways of getting round the 
problem." 

The Ateliers had always been 
closed to all but those participating. 
"The producer-director teams were 
privy to valuable input from the 
commissioning editors, but others 
were left out of this particular activ- 
ity," Masson explains. "We started 
Meeting around Co -Production in 
order to share the benefits with a 
wider group of professionals." These 
meetings are still pitching sessions 
for pre-selected projects, but 
Masson confirms that the former 
requirement that selected projects 
have 25% of financing in place and 
at least one broadcaster signed on as 
a co-producer have been softened. 
Some financing is still required, and 
a letter of intent rather than a con- 
tract from a broadcaster will do. 
Also new is that the meetings are 
themed — one afternoon was devot- 
ed to nature programs this year, 
another to history — so that the 
right projects are being pitched to 
the right commissioning editors. Jan 



In 1998 Sunny Side 

of the Doc initiated 

"Premieres," a new 

prize category within 

the competition 

dedicated to first 

films by new 

filmmakers. 



Rofekamp, producer and 
head of Transit Films of 
Toronto, moderated the 
meetings last year. 
The principle of the 
pitching sessions is what 
it always has been: the 
projects' defenders have 
20 minutes to make their 
case and the commission- 
ing editors respond, cit- 
ing what they liked, did- 
n't like, or would like to 
see further developed 
about the projects. 
What's new is that now 
an audience can ask questions about the 
responses of the programmers, or about their 
own projects where they see a link. "We aim to 
make these sessions as interactive as possible," 
Masson comments. "The deal with commission- 
ing editors is that they are there to inform mem- 
bers of the documentary-making community. 
The idea is that they should talk." Listening in 
on the pitches and the question and answers 
afterward, "people should come away with a con- 
crete idea of what broadcasters want in that spe- 
cific domain," he continues. 

Aware that some privacy is necessarily lost 
with the new arrangement, Masson added the 



r 



John Burgan of Germany, 
whose Memory of Berlin 
competed in the new 
"Premieres" section. 

Photo: Matthias Olmeta 




all-new Side by Sides. These are privileged half- 
hour sessions with three commissioning editors 
of a producer's choice. Project-pushers must sub- 
mit their embryonic films in advance, but there is 
no weeding-out process: all of last year's 100 
requests were met. Two weeks before the market, 
producers registered with Sunny Side received a 
list of some 20 commissioning editors due in 
Marseilles for the market, with a paragraph on 
each about their channel, themselves, and exam- 
ples of the sort of films they co -produce and air. 
The producers selected three from the list and 
Sunny Side set up one-to-one meetings with 
each. The meetings were set in a bistro in town, 
away from the high-pace of the docu market. 
Privacy was assured. "I was surprised at the 
extent to which commissioning editors got 
involved," Masson remarks. "Even when the pro- 
jects were not what they were looking for, they 
often suggested who else might be interested in 
them. And when they were frankly not good or 
not well-presented, they gave advice on how to 
make them better." 

"The direction we want to pursue with Sunny 
Side of the Doc is away from the theoretical, the 
general, and toward the concrete," he empha- 
sizes. One senses that stimulating direct dialogue 
between producers and broadcasters is a sort of 
mission at Sunny Side. "The better producers 
understand programmers' needs, the more effec- 
tive they can be in 
meeting them," con- 
_^^^^. eludes Masson. "This 

is good for the pro- 
duction side, but it is 
also a big help for 
programmers. They 
end up with a lighter 
load of misdirected 
projects to sort 
through and a real 
choice among more 
relevant work in 
development." 

Sunny Side of the Docs 
can be contacted at 3 
Square Stalingrad, 

13001 Marseilles, 

France, or by fax: 01133 
4 91 84 38 34. 

Bethany Haye 

Bethany Haye 

[bhaye@ 

compuserve.com] is a 

Paris-based freelance 

writer. 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 11 



THE SMALL SCREEN 



A New Star Rising: 
BET MOVES INTO PRODUCTION 



With the recent completion of its fourth 
feature, Loving Jezebel, the cable channel, BET 
Movies/STARZ!3 (BET Movies) has firmly 
established itself as a major funder, as well as 
being a broadcaster of African American cinema. 
BET Movies, launched in January 1997, is a joint 
venture of BET Holdings, Inc. and Encore Media 
Group LLC (EMG). BET Holdings, Inc. is a 
multi-media entertainment company that owns 
and operates Black Entertainment Television 
(BET), the first national cable network (founded 
in 1991) aimed exclusively at an African 
American audience, which is currently available 
in 54 million cable households. EMG is the 
largest provider of cable and satellite-delivered 
premium movie channels in the United States 
through its ownership of 1 1 domestic networks, 
and has a total basic subscriber base of nearly five 
million. 

Robert Leighton, senior vice president, pro- 
gramming, for EMG, oversees all functions of 
EMGs programming division and his avowed 
commitment to diversity is apparent from the 
four original programs that BET 
Movies/STARZ!3 will broadcast: Melvin Van 
Peebles' Classified X, Funny Valentine, Loving 
Jezebel, and Scandalize My Name. (BET was exec- 
utive producer on Jezebel and Scandalize.) "It is 
anticipated that we would be funding and devel- 
oping at least a few a year of these original films, 
[which will] all be in the one million to four mil- 
lion range," says Leighton, "although we're open 
in both directions. Ultimately, it will come down 
to the projects." 

BET Movies/STARZ!3's first fully-financed 
film, Loving Jezebel, stars Hill Harper (Get on the 
Bus, He Got Game) and is planned for theatrical 
release in 1999. The story revolves around a 
helpless romantic (Harper) who repeatedly finds 
himself falling in love with other mens' women. 
The project marks the directorial debut of Kwyn 
Bader and is produced by David Lancaster 
('Night Mother), with an ensemble cast that 
includes Laurel Holloman (The Myth of 
Fingerprints) Nicole Parker (Boogie Nights), David 
Moscow (Big), and Phylicia Rashad (Cosrry). 

Bader and Lancaster were accepted into the 
International Film Financing Conference, which 
accepts maybe 50 projects per annum. "Nobody 
was responding to the project" says Bader. "The 
buyers were coming up with these excuses like 



'black films aren't doing well overseas,' so we'd 
say, 'Well this is multi-racial,' and then they'd 
come up with another excuse. But BET Movies 
really stepped up to the plate for us and by 
springtime [1998] they had financed the film." 




According to Marc McCarthy, Vice President of 
Communications at BET, Jezebel came in at "just 
under two million." 

In terms of acquisition, the cabler's first doc 
was a completely different process because it 
already had a foreign home. Melvin Van Peebles' 
Classified X was more or less completed, having 
been funded principally with foreign funding 
from Les Films d'Ici, Arte, and YEAH Inc., but it 
did not have a domestic home. "There were 
additional funds required to bring it back to the 
United States," says McCarthy. 

Alexandra Isles, director of the second docu- 
mentary acquisition, Scandalise M} Name, 
explained that her project was "on life support 
because I couldn't afford to buy the archival 
material and photographs" prior to her 
encounter with BET. Leighton notes how this 
was a case "in which we put up the completion 
funding for the picture, in exchange for the right 
to play it on our channel; in fact we retained all 
rights." With regards to Funny Valentine, "We 
have a relationship with Universal — we have 
exclusive so-called output deals by which we get 
all of Universale movies. My Funny Valentine 
actually is the eleventh picture we've made with 
them." 



"We're looking for the independents who have a 
good idea, like Kwyn Bader with Loving Jezebel or 
Melvin Van Peebles with Classified X or an 
Alexandra Isles with Scandalize M;y Name, to 
come to us," says Leighton. "We want to get 
scripts because if we see a project we like, we can 
go to a Studio USA [Universal's TV movie divi- 
sion] to help us produce it." Leighton hastens to 
add that BET is adding a development program, 
which will become active in 1999. What is not to 
be taken for granted is the exposure for the direc- 
tor and high profile 
platforming of a 
film that HBO, 
Showtime, TNT, 
and now BET 
Movies can offer, to 
help ensure the vis- 
ibility of future pro- 
jects, as directors 
such as Ernest 
Dickerson 
(Rosewood) and 
Forrest Whittaker 
(Strapped) have 
proved. 

McCarthy is also 
clear on promotion- 
al plans for the nar- 
ratives slated. "The 
first film we are sub- 
mitting for consideration to Sundance is Jezebel. 
We're currently looking at the other film festivals 
to see where we should place Jezebel and secon- 
darily Funny Valentine." 

The first of the four original programs to air 
was Melvin Van Peebles' Classified X, which had its 
U.S. TV premiere on BET Movies on November 
13. Written and narrated by Van Peebles, 
Classified X explores the movie images that have 
helped sustain racism throughout the decades. 
Van Peebles' film was the beginning of a month- 
long celebration of his work on BET Movies in 
an effort to fill a need which he believes BET 
Movies addresses. "What I think the urban film 
needs right now is an infrastructure, not only in 
production but in distribution," states Van 
Peebles. 

BET Movies/STARZ!3 can be contacted at 
(303) 771-7700. 

Rita Michel is an independent producer 

and promotions director, and writes for the New 

York Independent Film Monitor. 



12 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 




CALL FOR ENTRIES 

GEN ART FILM FESTIVAL 1999 

NEW YORK CITY / APRIL 28TH - MAY 4TH 1999 / 7 PREMIERES 7 PARTIES 

CELEBRATING A NEW GENERATION OF FILMMAKERS 

For mare submission information call GEN ART at 212.290.0312 or http://iniiflfini.genart.org 

FINAL DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS FEBRUARY 15, 1999 

All genres of short and feature film including narrative, documentary, experimental and animated work are accepted. (No video or works-in-progress please) 



GEN 



ART 



Nuts & Bolts is about production planning -- what you do before you walk onto the set. 

"If you plan to make a movie, take this course!" 

- Jerry Ziesmer, 1st AD, "Jerry Maguire", "Apocalypse Now" 



Nuts & Bolts I: 

Principles and Practice of 
Scheduling and Budgeting 
Los Angeles Feb 20-21 
New York Mar 13-14 



ROBERT 
BORDIGA'S 




Nuts 
& Bolts 

PRODUCTION SEMINARS 



Nuts & Bolts II: 

Finer Points of Line Producing 
New York Mar 27-28 
Los Angeles Apr 3-4 

1 -800-755-7763 

www.onbudget.com 



i i^\^u^v_^v^ii\»^ii v-^ i — i t i i i i / ti \v^ vvvvvv.ui luuuyci.tuin 

Nuts & Bolts is "for everyone at every level of experience 

- Todd Hallowell, Executive Producer, "Apollo 13", "Ransom" 



Gutting edge 
at cut rates 



AVID On-line AVR-77 
with 3-D Pinnacle Board 

Interformat On-line 

D-E-, Digital Beta 

Nulti-format Duplication 

Standards Conversion 

Multimedia Production 

Camera Rentals 



R.G.VIDEO 

72 MADISON AVENUE 
NEW YORK, NY 10016 

(212)213-0426 



AUDIOA'IDEO 

POST PRODUCTION 



A 

VoiceWorks® 
Sound Studios 
212-541-6592 

Media 100 XS System 

After Effects /Boris Effects 
Scanner/Photoshop 

Sonic Solutions 
Digital Audio Editing 

Voice Over Casting 
Voice Over Recording 
Reasonable Rates!!! 



353 West 48th Street 2nd 11 ■ 

New York, New York 10036 

FAX: 212-541-8139 
E-Mail: vworksC" aol.com 



PUBLIC FUNDING 



WHAT'S UP WITH NLCC? 



Dispute with CPB shuts down Latino consortium 



The independent filmmaking community was 
shocked last spring to discover that the National 
Latino Communications Center (NLCC), a non- 
profit programming organization funded largely 
by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting 
(CPB), had closed its doors. The NLCC has co- 
funded and co-produced dozens, if not hundreds, 




Chicano! A History of the Mexican- 
American Civil Rights Movement, a 
landmark film co-produced by the now 
defunct NLCC. 

Courtesy Archives of Labor and Urban 
Affairs, Wayne State University 



of pro- 
grams 
about 

Latino culture since it was founded in 1975 (it 
was incorporated in 1989), including 1996's 
vaunted Chicano! History of the Mexican American 
Civil Rights Movement. The NLCC is one of five 
non-profits dedicated to minority programming 
known as the minority consortia, including the 
National Black Programming Consortium, 
National Asian American Telecommunications 
Association, Native American Public 
Telecommunications, Inc., and Pacific Islanders 
in Communication. All five are funded primarily 
by CPB. (ITVS, which is also funded by CPB, is 
not considered part of the minority consortia.) 

According to the NLCC, the shutdown was 
necessitated by the fact that CPB had withheld 
one of its annual payments. The absence of that 
funding prevented the organization from paying 
operational expenses and staff salaries, forcing it 
"temporarily" to shut its doors. 

But according to Miriam A. Crawford, 
Director External Affairs and System 
Development at CPB, a routine audit of the 
NLCC in late 1997 uncovered "financial discrep- 
ancies" that resulted in a larger audit than the 
typical bi-annual audits that minority consortia 
must submit to CPB's Office of the Inspector 



General, covering the fiscal years 1995-1997. A 
press release issued March 12, 1998, by CPB 
read, in part, "CPB has repeatedly asked the 
NLCC to provide explanations for discrepancies 
in reported salary, finance, and expense state- 
ments. We have had no adequate response. 
Future funding of the NLCC is contingent upon 
results of that audit and satisfacto- 
ry answers to our questions." 
A seemingly unconcerned Jose 
Luis Rodriguez, then the NLCC's 
Executive Director, told the Los 
Angeles Times last March, "This 
isn't anything that hasn't hap- 
pened before — although we have 
never had to close our doors." 
Rodriguez has not responded to 
numerous queries by The 
Independent for comment. 
In late March, CPB's Inspector 
General issued its final audit 
report, a blistering 3 2 -page array of 
improprieties about the NLCC's 
misuse of funding. Programming 
funds, reserved "exclusively" by contract for the 
"funding of development, production, postpro- 
duction and/or acquisition of programs" were 
used for administrative costs like salaries and 
travel. Employee expenditures, including credit 
card charges to the Los Angeles Dodgers and 
other retail vendors, from liquor stores to dry 
cleaners, could not be linked to legitimate busi- 
ness activities. The NLCC's accounting methods 
were sharply criticized in the audit report and 
conflict of interest charges were leveled against 
several board members who had also received 
grants, violating what CPB called the normal 
"separation of responsibilities" between board 
members and grant recipients. 

The Independent also learned that CPB even 
audited the private business records of indepen- 
dent producers who received NLCC funding, like 
Hector Galan, even though they had nothing to 
do with the NLCC's internal business practices. 
Galan told The Independent that the experience 
was a nightmare. "They were in here for weeks, 
going through books and records, occupying an 
entire office," he said of CPB's auditors. "It was 
terribly disrupting." Other producers who would 
not speak on the record out of fear their NLCC 
or CPB funding be jeopardized, suggested CPB 
was flexing its muscles to keep the minority con- 
sortia from seeking a bigger piece of the funding 



14 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



pie. "There has been conflict between the con- 
sortia and CPB forever," said one filmmaker. 
"And it's always about money." 

When first contacted for a response, board 
member Bea Stotzer assured The Independent that 
the NLCC was eager to cooperate with press 
inquiries and to put their position about the 
sequence of events squarely on the record. 
According to Stotzer, the NLCC had filed sup- 
plementary materials with CPB and the Inspector 
General who, again according to Stotzer, "accept- 
ed the NLCC's arguments." But despite over two 
dozen inquiries between March and October, 
including e-mails, phone messages, and letters 
faxed to both the NLCC and Ms. Stotzer 's 
offices, no further information or supporting doc- 
umentation has been made available to The 
Independent. While CPB eventually released the 
payment and the NLCC reopened, Rodriguez is 
no longer with the organization and a replace- 
ment has not been hired. 

[Editor's note: At press time, Charles Fancher, 
vice president, communications at CPB contact- 
ed The Independent to say that the CPB was near- 
ing a solution to the NLCC debacle. Interviews 
had been carried out "some time ago" with inter- 
ested and appropriate bodies, according to 
Fancher, with a view towards reaching "an inter- 
im arrangement with an organization to get dol- 
lars flowing into the Latino community again . . . 
in a timely and professional way." If the funds for 
1998 aren't spent, the CPB's budget allocation for 
the NLCC can be rolled over to the next finan- 
cial year, but the CPB was keen to see the funds 
allocated before the year was out.] 

The NLCC can be contacted at (213) 663-8294- 
The CPB is at (202) 879-9600. See p.TK for details of 
the NLCC meeting at AIVF in January. 

Mark J. Huisman [cinemark(a mindspring.com], a 
contributing editor at The Independent, is a free- 
lance journalist and independent producer. 



OBITUARY 

Albert Johnson, former artistic director of the 
San Francisco Film Festival, died of a heart attack 
on Oct. 17th. He was 74- A graduate of Berkeley 
and Oxford, he was a contributor to Sight & 
Sound before moving to San Francisco and co- 
founding Film Quarterly. After seven years with 
the SFFF, he spent from 1974 until his death at 
UC Berkeley lecturing on minority and Third 
World cinema, and on screen musicals. — PP 



Off Line/On Line /AVR 77 

RAfitiAhfiyil 



1133 Broadway at 26th Street 
(212) 633-7497 
(917) 225-2430 (24 hrs.) 2 



All Systems MC 7.0 PCI 



I) 




Tape-to-Film Transfers... 

Call Film Craft. Our Teledyne CTR-3 uses high-grade precision optics 
and pin-registration for a rock-steady transfer and superior results. 



A FEW OF OUR SATISFIED CLIENTS INCLUDE: 


Lynn Hershman 


"Virtual Love" 


Laurel Chiten 


"Twitch and Shout" 


Jane Gillooly 


"Leona's Sister Gem" 


Heather MacDonald 


"Ballot Measure 9" 


Outsider Productions 


"Sex Is" 



l/l/e offer a two-minute MOS 16mm color demo at no charge from 
your videotape. 



(f<$tL 




Fikh Processing & Printing.., 

We've been processing and printing motion picture film for over 
25 years, so we understand the challenges of the independent 
filmmaker. We're a full-service film laboratory and one of the few 
labs that still processes black & white film. 



For professional lab services, call us first. 



■ Dai ly Pro cessing 

■ Black & White Proce ssing and Printing -- 16mm and 55m m 

■ Colo r Pr ocessing and Printing-- 16mm an d 35mm 

■ C amera Raw Stocks 

■ Rank/da Vinci Film-to-Tape Transfer 

l/l/e offer special student rates. 



7^%& 



23815 Industrial Park Drive ■ Farmmgton Hills, Ml 48335 
Voice: 248.474.3900 ■ Fax: 248.474.1577 

Film Craft Lab, a division of Grace & Wild, Inc. 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 15 



AL CIRCUIT 



n Ozark Outing 

The Hot Springs 
Documentary Film 
Festival 

by Tim S ch wab 



Nestled in the Ozark Mountains in 
Arkansas, Hot Springs is a picturesque town 
catering to tourists, weekenders from Dallas, 
Memphis, and Little Rock, and a growing 
retirement community. Designated as a 
National Park, the town is noted for its natural 
hot water mineral haths, a charming historic 
downtown, and a storied past as an "open 
town" once frequented by gamblers, bootleg- 
gers, and gangsters — not to mention the most 
famous graduate of the local high school, Bill 
Clinton. In recent years, the town has also 
become known in the film world for hosting the 
Hot Springs Documentary Film Festival, 
which, despite its somewhat obscure location, 
has quietly developed a strong reputation. 
Judging by this year's festival, this reputation is 
richly deserved. 

The festival started in 1992 when members 
of the active arts community decided to host a 
screening of Academy Award-nominated docu- 
mentaries. From that beginning, the festival 
and its parent organization, the Hot Springs 
Documentary Film Institute, now operates with 
a substantial budget. While it now owns the 
downtown Malco Theatre and screens docu- 
mentary programs year-round, the festival is 
still the institute's main reason for being. It still 
shows all the Academy Award-nominated docs 
and the International Documentary Associa- 
tion winners. But it has steadily broadened its 
scope, this year screening over 70 films and 
hosting 41 filmmakers to a stay at the historic 
Arlington Hotel and an impressive series of 
receptions, parties, dinners, and screenings. 

"Without really knowing it, we found a seg- 
ment of the film world that was waiting to be 
showcased," says HSDFI president Lorraine 
Benini. "The filmmakers are the heart of the 
festival. Our whole effort is to support film- 
makers, and the filmmakers love us. They tell 
us time and again that the best part of the fes- 
tival is being able to meet and spend time with 
other documentary filmmakers in a noncom- 
petitive atmosphere. They don't get too many 
opportunities to do that. We have in the past 




suggested the idea of giving awards, and they 
shot that down. It's really their festival." 

The festival runs 10 days in mid-October, 
with most invited films screening twice, once 
during the first week, and usually again on the 
final weekend, when the majority of the visiting 
filmmakers are in attendance and most of the 
major social events are held. In addition, the 
festival features a celebrity guest — this year was 
actress/singer Connie Stevens with her docu- 
mentary A Healing, a tribute to the women who 
served in Vietnam — as well as a series of 
humanities forums, which included a retrospec- 
tive consideration of Pare Lorentz presided 
over by the venerable Erik Barnouw, and a trib- 
ute to the "legacy on film" of Dr. Martin Luther 
King. 

But the heart of the festival is the screening 
of contemporary documentaries and Q&A ses- 
sions. Since the festival has a high profile in the 
community, audiences for even the most 
obscure works can be quite large, made up of 
locals, filmmakers, tourists, and members of 
nearby retirement communities. This mix 
means that questions can range from mundane 
nuts-and-bolts queries to profundity ("What 
are the things that give sustenance to the soul?" 
one woman asked a befuddled filmmaker), 
making the festival a great place to gauge reac- 
tion and exchange ideas with "real folks." And 
yes, people in Arkansas are as friendly as you've 
heard. 

The striking thing about the weekend roster 



was the dominance of lighter, crowd-pleasing 
films. From Oscar-nominated shorts like 
Andrea Baugrund's Still Kicking: The Fabulous 
Palm Sprmg Follies and Terri Randall's Daughter 
oj the Bride to Harry Lynch and Jeff Fraley's 
slick, wry Bull Riders: Cluising the Dream, there 
was an abundance of fun, character-driven 
entertainment. One suspects this has less to do 
with the programmers and more to do with a 
generational change among documentary film- 
makers and the all-pervasive influence of tele- 
vision — or maybe documentary has finally 
developed a sense of humor. But there were 
also a number of good films for the more seri- 
ous-minded, notably the emotionally powerful 
Colors Straight Up, by Michele Ohayon and 
Julia Schacter, Can't You Hear the Wind Howl?, 
Peter and Constance Meyers' fascinating por- 
trait of legendary blues man Robert Johnson, as 
well as such widely- screened titles as the Long 
Way Home, Human Remains, and 4 Little Girls. 
For many, the highlight was the Shorts 
Program. From first-time director Lisa Kohn's 
charming Apart from M} Doll to Chris 
Sheridan's surprisingly hilarious account of life 
before and after the accident that put him in a 
wheelchair, Walk This Way, they were all great 
and the diverse, packed audience loved them, 
leading one to wonder anew why television and 
many festival programmers steadfastly refuse to 
show shorts. The question gains added signifi- 
cance when one thinks of television viewers all 
over the planet routinely clicking through 



16 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



channel after channel of contemptible swill; 
what's wrong with this picture? 

The festival is amazingly well-organized, 
considering it is run almost entirely by volun- 
teers under the always competent and gracious 
supervision of festival director Gretchen Miller. 
The facilities at the two-screen Malco Theatre 
were adequate, but given the age of the build- 
ing and equipment, still left something to be 
desired. That's why the institute is embarking 
on an ambitious fund-raising campaign to 
finance a major renovation. When that is com- 
pleted, this festival has the potential to rival 
any other film showcase in the country. 

But rather than rival other documentary fes- 
tivals, such as Toronto's HotDocs and Duke 
University's DoubleTake, Hot Springs would 
rather work arm in arm. "We love the fact that 
there are these other documentary festivals 
and would like to see more networking and 
cross-promoting between them," says Benini. 
"Our spirit is very much one of cooperation." 
She imagines working together to package a 
traveling show, create a speaking circuit, or 
even push for the creation of a documentary 
archive. 

The final formal event in the festival was a 
gala banquet, where attending filmmakers were 
wined, dined, praised, and applauded to an 
extent that would have been downright embar- 
rassing, had it not been so much fun. 
Afterwards, the festival staff and board sat 
down with the filmmakers for a private post- 
mortem. After a brief discussion, the festival 
people once again raised the idea of giving 
awards. The filmmakers, once again, strongly 
resisted the idea, favoring instead the current 
format, which allows documentary makers to 
meet, talk, screen, schmooze and party in a 
relaxed and collegial atmosphere, without the 
pressure of constantly feeling they should be 
handing out flyers or trying to meet Mr. 
Megabucks at the next table. What it came 
down to was that the festival organizers rightly 
feel they have a great event that should be 
more widely recognized, and giving awards 
would help do that. Filmmakers countered that 
they could all tag their films as "Official 
Selection of the Hot Springs Film Festival" and 
accomplish the same thing. It seems that, hav- 
ing been here once, most filmmakers were 
eager to repeat the Hot Springs experience. 

Tim Schwab is a filmmaker and teacher based in 
Montreal. Schwab and Christina Craton's IDA award- 
winning The Burning Barrel previously screened at 

Hot Springs. 



Virginia is for Film Lovers 



by Pat Aufderheide 



The Virginia Film Festival was launched 1 1 
years ago to attract celebrities to horse -country 
Virginia; to boost tourism; and to add cultural 
cachet to the University of Virginia. Under the 
curatorial aegis of Richard Herskowitz, it has 
evolved over four years into a film lovers' event 
with a socially critical bite and an experimental 
edge — as well as a horse country party. 

Each year at Halloween, the festival unrolls 
over four days, loosely organized around a 
theme. This year, it was "Cool"; in the past two 
years, it has been "U.S. and Them" and 



*•**.*- 



I^-UJ-UIA 




"Caged." Films can range from silent classics to 
hot-outta-the-Avid student shorts, contextual - 
ized with lectures, workshops, art exhibits, and 
receptions. 

The festival makes so many improbable con- 
nections that one person's festival is almost 
guaranteed not to be another's. This year, many 
attendees seemed baffled why films such as the 
lurid 1928 Louise Brooks vehicle, Pandora's Box, 
the insider portrait of country music Payday 
(1973), starring Rip Torn, and experimental 
film artist Lynn Hershman-Leeson's 1997 fea- 
ture Conceiving Ada were all under the "cool" 
rubric. "For me, cool is about the contrast 
between a tough exterior and a vulnerable core, 
and the fascination is watching the different 
valuation given each in different periods of 
American culture," Herskowitz explains. 

One easy connection was with Beat and 
Beat-influenced films, as evidenced especially 
in jazz scores. The festival featured visits from 
jazz composer David Amram and Beat-era 
poets Diane di Prima and Ed Sanders, attending 
among other things a screening of Robert Frank 
and Alfred Leslie's of-its-time-and-place 1958 
Pidl M\ Daisy. Director Arthur Penn and actor 
Rip Torn attended a tribute to the Actors 



Studio, including a 
screening of the 1965 
paranoid classic Micke) 1 
One, starring Warren 
Beatty as a comic fleeing 
"the mob" (a.k.a. McCarthyism). Penn found 
inspiration to resist Big Brotherism, he said, in 
Beat spontaneity. In a focus on "New American 
Cinema" and underground film, scholar Ray 
Carney suggested that the work of John 
Cassavetes — the too-little-seen film Shadows 
was screened — resisted Big Hollywoodism. 

Just as filmgoers were beginning to get 
restive with negative and absent images of 
women in Beat-influenced work, feminist 
Carolee Schneeman presented her experimen- 
tal films. The discussion, facilitated by critic B. 
Ruby Rich, spoke 
both to the era's 
misogyny and to 
the way early femi- 
nist film shared in 
Beat celebration of 
carnal spontaneity. 
Current indepen- 
dent work exposed 
ocal viewers to a 
wide range of 
visions. Shorts 

ranged from the 
promising (Adam 
Collis' teen 

romance "MAD" Boy, I'll Blow Your Blues Away. 
Be Mine.) to the self-indulgent (Larry Fishman's 
one -joke Zchlom, about masturbation and the 
art market). Showcased features included 
Spencer Nakasako's documentary Kelly Loves 
Tony; Susanna Styron's Shadrach, on the legacy 
of slavery on one plantation; Tom Musca's 
Melting Pot, about ethnic politics at election 
time; and first feature Thirteen. Richmond- 
based Euro -American David Williams made 
Thirteen on a hyperlow budget, with and about 
his working-class African-American neighbors. 
The neo-realistic film, which follows one young 
girl as she struggles through a difficult teen year, 
captures details of daily lives that are largely 
unimagined on screen. Having made a splash at 
Berlin and Toronto, the film was well-received 
at home. 

In one weekend, you could debate African- 
American culture in American independent 
cinema; chart advertising's embrace of "cool"; 
look back at American independent film histo- 
ry; and sample current work. Or you could 
admire the autumn leaves while antique hunt- 
ing in the hills. 

Pat Aufderheide is Professor irt the School of 
Communication, American Uriiversity in DC. 



January/February 1999 T H E I N D E P E N E N T 17 




FESTIVAL CIRCUIT 



Hamptons Come Alive! 



by Scott Castle 



East Hampton's 
quaint buildings 
and upscale 
boutiques still 
bore the tricolor 
decorations 
from the town's 
350th anniversary cele- 
bration as filmmakers 
rolled in for the 
Hamptons Film Festival 
(October 14-18), one of 
the village's newest tra- 
ditions. Although cele- 
brating its sixth year, the 
festival is still searching for an iden- 
tity. Having had four different pro- 
gramming directors in the last four 
years, it's been a challenge for this 
perpetually promising festival to find its groove. 
Incoming programming director David 
Schwartz, along with a triumvirate of co-pro- 
grammers — Deena Juras, Lynda Hansen, and 
Linda Blackaby — were able to bring new depth. 
The team tripled the number of archival films, 
added more discussions with filmmakers, and 
spotlighted one film on each of the festival's 
five nights. 

Though Schwartz acknowledges the growing 
pains caused by the variety of programming 
styles and identities the festival has gone 
through, he's bullish about its future. "It's 
important for the Hamptons to find itself in 
relation to all these other festivals," he says. 
"It's going to grow year by year. I think it'll take 
some time before it gets to that really high level." 
In the meantime, the Hamptons has plenty 
of bumps to work out. While the majority of 
events took place within walking distance of 
the village center, one theater was a 15-minute 
drive away, nightly parties were even further, 
and some guest lodgings were out-of-town. In 
combination with a virtually all-new festival 
staff, logistical nightmares ensued. Some morn- 
ings began with a 45 -minute wait on the road- 
side for a shuttle into town. At night, some par- 
ties let you in without a pass, while others 
turned you away with the proper pass, leaving 
one with the infuriating task of procuring 
return transportation. Other festival-goers 
complained of puzzling tasks like deciphering 
which screenings included discussions and who 




was to be featured on a breakfast 
panel. Too often, fulfilling your day's 
schedule was a matter of luck. 
Attempts to inform festival workers 
of the difficulties were treated cor- 
dially enough, but with an air of disbelief that 
things might not be running smoothly. This 
gave the impression that all the old problems 
would soon be new again. 

From the filmmakers' perspective, however, 
acclaim for the festival was overwhelmingly 
positive. Director Max Makowski, there with 
The Pigeon Egg Strategy, began his long festival 
crawl at Sundance 1998 and is "quasi wrapping 
it up" with his first visit to the Hamptons. "If 
film festivals were relationships, Sundance 
would be a very, very good hooker. Great sex, 
no love," he says. "[The Hamptons] is all about 
love, and the sex is okay." Makowski wasn't 
always so positive. "The last festival in the 
world I would have applied to was here; I 
thought it was all about stars and celebrities. 
All form, no substance. But filmmakers are 
treated with respect, and that's really rare. 
They care about us." 

In the end, the questions begin: Will 
Schwartz return next year? Will the other pro- 
grammers? Will the staff? Will the festival 
emerge as a source for premieres? With its prox- 
imity to Manhattan and one of the largest 
prizes on the circuit ($165,000 in goods and 
services), the Hamptons Film Festival is here to 
stay. This year's record attendance reinforces 
that. But if the flux in staff continues, it'll be 
difficult for the festival to learn from its mis- 
takes and live up to its potential. 

Scott Castle is the listings editor at The Independent. 



18 THE INDEPENDENT January /February 1999 



/ / I THINK 1998 WAS THE YEAR THAT PEOPLE 
stopped scratching their heads when 
you used 'digital filmmaking' in con- 
versation," says ResFest director 
Jonathan Wells, as the festival's sec- 
ond successful season comes to a close in 



October. A touring celebra- 
tion of the romance 
between technology and 
storytelling, ResFest's 1998 
program of shorts, features, 
and panels drew crowds in 
London, Los Angeles, San 
Francisco, and New York. But while last year's 
debut of ResFest [www.resfest.com] and its 
companion magazine, Res, pointed to a future 
in which independents get "wired," this year's 
fest suggests that, in many regards, the future is 
now. 

"Never before has the opportunity existed 
for so many creative people to have the access 



top auteurs and new ways of disseminating their 
work (from streaming video to Shockwave 
[www.shockwave.com] to DVD 

[www.dvdresource.com]), it's not lost on 
ResFest's organizers that without compelling 
films, their event might come off as a trade 



ResFest 



by Ryan Deussing 




and the means available to express themselves 
in the motion picture arts," writes Wells in the 
festival's literature. With three times as many 
submissions (over 300) as last year, the fest 
responded by expanding its programming, cre- 
ating three programs of shorts and showcasing 
three digital features: Iara Lee's Modulations, 
Stefan Avalos and Lance Weiler's The Last 
Broadcast, and Bennett Miller's The Cruise. 
Most notably, the features have attracted 
attention not only from festival audiences, but 
from theatrical distributors, who seem to 
believe that digital films are not only hip, but 
sellable (Artisan Entertainment released The 
Cruise, while Modulations was recently picked 
up by Strand Releasing). 

While the festival undoubtedly owes its 
niche to the digital revolution of the past few 
years, which has created both masses of desk- 



show. Hi-tech vendors did 
show off their wares in the 
lobby in San Francisco, but 
relatively few of the festival 
films were just showing off 
what could be done with 
After Effects and a lot of free 
time. The strongest were evidence of what can 
be achieved when filmmakers take advantage of 
new tools without making a fetish of the tech- 
nology. 

"The real value of the MiniDV format is not 
just the quality of the tape but that the cameras 
are small and inconspicuous," says Bennett 
Miller, whose popular doc follows an outcast 
genius tour guide through the streets of New 
York. "This simplicity also 
allows for more intimacy. All of 
these advantages were impor- 
tant while shooting The Cruise 
and reasons why I believe the 
MiniDV format will help revo- 
utionize documentary film- 
making." 
Smell of Horror, Mitch Butler's 
black-and-white animated 
story of a handyman's run-in 
with a demented hermit, was 
the best short without being 
the best-looking. Cre-ated with 
Lightwave 3D and PhotoShop, 
Smell of Horror stood out from 
the crowd of tricked-out shorts, a few of which 
looked like promos for software plug-ins. "I've 
received phone calls from development people 
and producers who have gone to the show," says 
Butler. "ResFest is a great place to get your work 
shown; that's the function it serves for the film- 
maker." 

Also hilarious was Dave Foss's irreverent 
Homed Gramma, 60 seconds of psychotic ram- 
bling by an old lady with a horn in her forehead. 
Created on a laptop with consumer video soft- 
ware, it's a perfect example of what can happen 
when the tools that sit on any advertising 
agency's hard drive are employed for less busi- 
nesslike purposes. 

"Our roster of filmmakers includes anima- 
tors, traditional filmmakers who've turned to 
digital, graphic designers who've turned their 
designs to motion, and fine artists who've done 



@ $ 1 

umtefi 



AfK 



€veriithirig far 
Post Production 

FULL LABORATORY $€RVIC€$ 

T€L€Cin€ 

€DIT0RIAL 

Past Prod. Supervisors 

Dailies Suncing 

€dge Coding 

Film Cditirtg 

Digital nonlinear 
Flatbed 

Assistant Editing 

On-Line €diting 

€quipment Rental 
$P€CIAL €FF€CT$ 

Digital/Optical 
$0UHD 

Design 

€diting 

€ffects 

Foleu 

ADR 

mixing 

Sweetening 

Transfers 

1/4" to (Tlag 
DAT to mag, 
mag. to Optics 

mime 

Composing 

Recording 

€diting 

Libraru 
VID€0 DUBBin 
TITL€$ & CR€Di 
n€GATIV€ Clrft* 
VID€0 TO FILm TRAfl$F€R$ 
DIGITAL TO FILm TRAftt 





f€M 



We are an independent Group 

of Businesses that make uaur 

Past Production nightmare a 

DR€ Am 



For more Information call 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 19 



iH 



Ann Arbor 

FILM 

Festival 

MARCH 16-21 



1999 



Call 

for 

Entries 



16mm independent & 

experimental films of all 

genre: 

documentary, 

animation, narrative, 

experimental, 

personal documentary 



FILM ENTRY DEADLINE 
FEBRUARY 1, 1999 




ENTRY FEES 

per film entered: 

$32 US 

$37 Canadian & overseas 



AWARDS JURORS 

Mike Hoolboom Canadian 
experimental filmmaker 
/ Lynne Sachs experimental & 
documentary filmmaker 
Chel White Portland, 
OR-based animator 



*m 



ENTRY INFORMATION 

phone 734.995.5356 fax 734.995.5396 
vicki@honeyman.org http://aafilmfest.org 

ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL 

PO Box 8232 
Ann Arbor, Ml 48107 USA 




the same," says Wells. "We also get an audience 
that doesn't attend other film festivals, includ- 
ing broadcast designers, creative directors, and 
new media producers." 

"One of the huge dangers of working in this 
medium is getting trapped up trying to stay cur- 
rent with all the latest digital tricks," said 
Michael Tucker during a panel on "The Future 
of Filmmaking." "It's important to establish 
your own identity through what you do. My 
advice to aspiring filmmakers is not to spend 
time and money on film school — I have a 
G.E.D. — but to buy some equipment and some 
plane tickets." The Last Cowboy, Tucker's 
direct-to-DVD film about a forgotten East and 
an elusive West, was shot on MiniDV in 
Germany, Bosnia, and the U.S. and is billed as 
an "ambient narrative/stream of conscious- 
ness." 

The buzz at this year's ResFest that wasn't 
about individual films involved ways of har- 
nessing technology to get around the current 
distribution bottleneck. While Wavelength 
Releasing is beaming The Last Broadcast to the- 
aters across the country via satellite, there are 
more reasonable means of self-distribution at 
filmmakers' disposal. "There has been talk 
about using DVD or some variation of it to 
replace the print that gets sent to theaters," 
says Wells. In fact, the audience was rather 
impressed when portions of The Last Cowboy 
were projected using ResFest's Digital 
Projection system 

[www.digitalprojection.com], which uses thou- 
sands of micro-mirrors to project individual 
pixels. Already a common part of production, 
perhaps the day is not far off when digital imag- 
ing technology changes the way films are dis- 
tributed and exhibited. Until then, ResFest 
does a commendable job of programming pro- 
jects that represent both the DIY spirit of inde- 
pendent filmmaking and the technological 
innovations that make new things possible. 

Ryan Deussing [ryan(a thing.net] is a filmmaker and 
former managing editor of The Independent. 




Mexican Overture 

by Mary Sutter 

While Mexico 
used to be the 
center of Latin 
American film 
production, the 
local industry 
has fallen on 
hard times. 

Production has 
dropped to a 60- 
year low, with 
fewer than 1 5 
features in pro- 
duction. As even established filmmakers have 
trouble drumming up financing, short films and 
videos have managed to keep the local scene 
alive and are virtually the only form of truly 
independent or experimental production. 

"If there were more money, people would 
make features," acknowledges Enrique Ortiga, 
organizer of the first International Shorts 
Festival of Mexico City, held Oct. 1-7 [cor- 
tomex@dfl. telmex.net. mx|. "But the short 
format has evolved into a recognized move- 
ment." The fest acknowledged this by taking 
form in 1994 as a showcase of Mexican shorts 
from the years 1990-1994- A second showcase 
for 1995-96 productions was held two years 
later. Given the success of the 1998 festival, 
organizers are planning to go annual. This year 
attendance reached 9,500, helped by the fact 
that regular screenings were held at four the- 
aters around the city and in several alternative 
spaces. And a new component was added this 
year: a U.S. -Mexican conference on shorts, 
which organizers hope will help nudge the 
event's profile and industry attendance up a 
few notches in the future. 

The festival was open to any Mexican work 
made at home or abroad, as well as to foreign- 



20 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



ers dealing with Mexican themes. Twenty-five 
films were in competition, including works that 
have already been internationally recognized, 
such as Ariel Gordon's Adios Mama (Good-bye 
Mom) , Rene Castillo and Antonio Urrutia's Sin 
Sosten (No Means of Support), and Carlos 
Salces' En el Espejo del Cielo (In the Mirror of the 
Sky), winner of the Mexican Film Institute 
prize. A total of 53 videos were in competition, 
with works in animation, fiction, documentary, 
and experimental. The two video prizes went to 
independent videomaker Carlos Martinez 
Suarez for his Casos de Violencia Contra 
Comunidades lndigenas en Chiapas (Cases of 
Violence against Indigenous Communities of 
Chiapas) and Alejandro Cantu's Pelicula Perdida 
y Encontrada (Movie Lost, Movie Pound). 

While video winner 
Martinez Suarez was con- 
tacted by a potential sales 
agent, the fest lacks the 
resources to promote sales 
actively. "To date, the festi- 
val serves to promote the 
short format and to provide 
a forum for this work," says 
Ortiga. 





That may change if the four-day interna- 
tional conference grows. On hand this year 
were festival reps Shannon Kelley, co-program- 
mer of Los Angeles' Outfest and a short-film 
consultant for Sundance; Bryan Poyser from 
Cinematexas; and Flicker Film Festival founder 
Norwood Cheek. A total of 17 Mexican and 
American professionals participated as pan- 
elists. While the fest itself was open to the pub- 
lic, the conference was geared more to profes- 
sionals, and Ortiga plans to expand it next year. 
"The idea is that at future festivals we will dou- 
ble the presence of foreigners, especially those 
in acquisitions," he says. He also hopes the 
interaction among filmmakers may set the stage 
for future collaborations. 

Mary Sutter is a freelance journalist 
based in Mexico City. 




film 

SCHOOL 

with Dov S-S Simens 



...If you haven 't 
Produced, Directed 
or Distributed a 
Feature Film... 
...You haven't 
taken this course! 



LOS ANGELES 

Jan 30-31 or Mar 6-7 

WORLD TOUR 

COLOGNE: Jan 23-24 

SEATTLE: Feb 6-7 

SAN FRANCISCO: Feb 13-14 

ATLANTA: Feb 20-21 

CINCINNATI: Feb 27-28 

NEW YORK: Mar 13-14 

PHOENIX: Mar 27-28 



Can't Attend? Can't Wait? 
Audio Film School™ Available 



only 

$289 



http://HollywoodU.com 

HFI, Inc., PO Box 481252, LA, CA 90048 



HOLLYWOOD 



800-366-3456 



m. 



INSTITUTE 




SPLASH 

STUDIOS 



WAV - 



IGITAL AUDIO POST 
2 12*271 • 8 747 



DIALOG, FX EDITING ADR & FOLEY RECORDING 

168 5th Ave. ,5th floor N.W. New York N.Y. 10010 
Fax: (212) 271- 8748 e-mail: bplprod@aol.com 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 21 



Sundance on Prime Time 

The cable channel adds new strands. 



A by Shelley 
G abert 
FTER THREE YEARS OF OPERATION, 
the Sundance Channel seems 
finally to have found its voice and 
in the process become a haven for 
risk-taking filmmakers who often 
don't have anywhere else to go. 
In recent months, the Sun- 
dance Channel has spotlighted a 
diverse group of works from film- 
makers like Cheryl Dunye, an 
African American lesbian who wrote and 
directed Watermelon Woman, a pseudo-docu- 
mentary that follows her search for an African 
American lesbian actress from the 1930's. 
While Dunye's film had a limited arthouse 
release prior to its cablecast, others, like Allison 
Burnett's Red Meat, premiered on the channel. 
A brutal treatment of the sexual relationships 
between men and women, the controversial 
and serious film lacks a star and ends ambigu- 
ously, all of which made finding a distributor 
very difficult. Even Cinque Lee, Spike's broth- 
er, couldn't get a break distribution-wise with 
his directorial debut. Nowhere Fast, about a 
group of aimless New Yorkers, is also an apt 
description of where Lee's film was going until 
the Sundance Channel stepped in and gave it 
an audience of 14 million homes. 

'See it here or don't see it at all' is very 
much the spirit of the Sundance Channel," says 
Tom Harbeck, Executive Vice President of 
Programming and Creative Director. "We feel 
we are truly delivering on the promise of diver- 
sity and variety in our programming. Our phi- 
losophy is that a good film isn't about having 
so-and-so in your movie, it's about having a 
great story and doing it well." 

Harbeck along with Liz Manne, Senior Vice 
President, Programming and Creative 
Marketing, are part of a new leadership team 
that came on board in early '98 and are respon- 
sible in part for the channel's new direction in 
the past year. Manne came to Sundance 
Channel from Fine Line, where she headed up 
marketing for eight years, and Harbeck brings 




Guinevere 
Turner & 
Cheryl Dunye 
in Watermelon 
Woman, a les- 
bian feature 
that stirred up 
a fuss with 
conservatives 
but was aired 
without cuts 
on the 
Sundance 
Channel. 
Courtesy First 
Run Features 



his experience as creative 
director for Nickelodeon. 
Robert Redford was instrumental in putting 
the team together in hopes that they could 
reinvigorate the channel from a distribution 
and marketing standpoint, as well as a pro- 
gramming one. 

"When we came on board, the Sundance 
Channel was somewhat remote," says Harbeck. 
"We wanted to give it a personality and a point 




of view and to give the 
films some type of over- 
all context. To do that, 
we began to look for 
cutting-edge films and 
instead of running them 
cold we now surround 
them with interviews or 
information we've dug 
up about the filmmak- 
ers or the actors 
involved." 

In November, the 
channel premiered four 
new, weekly primetime 
slots designed to show- 
case the gamut of inde- 
pendent filmmaking. 
Fridays at 9:00 p.m. 
brings Something New, 
which features the TV, 



WHO TO CALL 



Larry Greenberg can be reached at 
Larry.Greenberg@showtinte.net or by fax at 

(310)234-5396. 

The Sundance Channel office is within the 

Showtime offices at 10880 Wilshire Blvd, Ste 1600, 

LA., CA 90024. 



All submissions to the Sundance Channel should be 
made to Larry Greenberg in Los Angeles. Someone 
from the acquisitions team will respond individually 
to all feature and documentary submissions, 
according to Liz Manne, but not shorts, because of 
the "daunting" volume. "It also really helps if the 
short has gotten into a film festival," she says. 
"While that isn't a prerequisite for features, there 
are so many shorts that come in, some culling 
helps." She urges filmmakers to make sure all of 
their clearances are done legally and to have a digi- 
tal Beta master. While Harbeck didn't want to dis- 
cuss how much the Sundance Channel pays per 
minute, Burnett's comment was "they pay okay." 



world, or U.S. premiere of a film. This program- 
ming block includes international cinema, 
including that from emerging film industries in 
Iran, Vietnam, and Latin America. "Something 
New is really exciting for all of us," says 
Harbeck. "It's a place for films like Red Meat, 
which may have generated some buzz at festi- 
vals but was never released, or was released for 
a short time but didn't receive much attention 
or exposure." 

Saturday Night Special, 
airing on Saturdays at 
9:00 p.m., is a place for 
what Manne refers to 
as films that the 
Sundance Channel 
team loves or deem 
important statements 
in independent film- 
making. "These are 
films that are old, new, 
borrowed, and blue 
and span the range 
from American classic 
to foreign film," she 
says. "Or [the series] 
might include a docu- 
mentary or a new 
American film. Films 
that our staff may have 
a personal passion for." 



22 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 




The weekly destination for shorts is called 
Shorts Stop and airs on Sundays at 8:00 p.m. 
"We already show more shorts than any other 
network on television," says Harbeck. "It's part 
of our heritage and mission. So many people 
don't get to see them outside of film festivals, 
and we want to give them a home." 

Matter of Fact on Mondays at 9:00 p.m. fea- 
tures documentaries. "I have a deep personal 
passion for documentaries," says Manne, who 
worked on Hoop Dreams while at Fine Line. 

Manne says the Sundance Channel will he 
looking for completed personal films or docs. 
"We are still a start-up channel and our agenda 
doesn't include financing nonfiction films. The 
cost of original programming is still beyond our 
scope right now," says Harbeck. "But the 
amount of money we have for acquisitions 
allows us to pick and choose from the 1,000 
independent feature films being made each 
year, in America alone. 

The Sundance Channel utilizes an acquisi- 
tion team of executives from Showtime 
Networks Inc., one of the venture partners in 
the Sundance Channel along with Redford and 
Polygram Filmed Entertainment. In addition to 
Harbeck and Manne, the core acquisitions 
team is made up of Matthew Duda, Executive 
V.R, Program Acquisition and Planning for 
Showtime Networks Inc.; Gary Garfinkel, Vice 
President of Acquisitions; Larry Greenberg, 
Supervisor of Acquisitions for Showtime and 
Sundance Channel; and Michael Horowitz, 
director of acquisitions for Showtime. Geoff 
Gilmore, Director of the Sundance Film 
Festival and Special Events, is also part of the 
team; although he acts in the capacity of pro- 
gramming consultant. Says Manne of the team, 
"We track things, we attend all the major film 
festivals, we go to screenings, we view our sub- 
missions [see box], and we have vigorous 
debates, but the buck falls here with Tom 
[Harbeck]." 



International Insurance Brokers Inc. 

Discounted 

Liability 

Insurance 

for 
AIVF Members 



Suite 500 

20 Vesey Street 

New York City,NY 

10007-2966 

Tel: 800-257-0883 

212-406-4499 

Fax:212-406-7588 

E-Mail: staff@csins.com 

http://www.csins.com 



M 



ISLAND MEDIA INTERNATIONAL 
212*252*3522 



Mil 



Media Composers 

• Film Negative Matchback 

• AVR77 

• 3D-DVE effects 

• 92 GIGS storage 

• Protools sound mix 
Transfers / Duplication 
Camera Pkgs / Animation 
Graphics / AVID Classes 



National 
Educational 
Media 
Network 



0h 




supporting excellence in 
educational media 

Presents 

Content '99 

1 3th Annual Media Market 

Conference & Festival 

May 19-22, 1999 

Airport Hilton Hotel 

Oakland, CA 

The Nation's Only Event Exclusively for 
Educational Media Professionals 



Media Market 

May 19-21 

The best, low-cost way to find a 

distributor for works-in-progress or 

finished productions 

Submission Deadlines: 

Early Bird: March 15 

Final: April 27 

Conference 

May 20-21 

Learn the latest trends in production, 

distribution & exhibition 

Early Bird Deadline: April 19 

Apple Awards 
Film & Video Festival 

May 21-22 

A curated selection of Apple Award winners 

at the Oakland Museum of California 



"The Media Market was key in securing 

distribution. Meeting so many distributors 

face to face was invaluable. I will definitely 

be back with my next film!" 

Lisa Leeman, Fender Philosophers 



NEMN 

655 Thirteenth St., Suite 100 

Oakland, CA 94612-1220 

PH: 510.465.6885 FX: 510.465.2835 

E-Mail: content@nemn.org 

www.nemn.org 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 23 




Relation to the festival 

The Sundance Channel shares the same mis- 
sion as the Sundance Film Festival, hut the 
channel operates completely independently of 
it and the Sundance Institute. 

"If we see a film at Sundance that we want, 
we compete like everyone else," says Harbeck. 
"We certainly don't limit our choices to only 
those films included in the festival. It's not fair 
to say to a filmmaker, you have to get into the 
festival before we'll consider your film." 

In fact, many of the films running on the 
Sundance Channel were rejected by the festi- 
val. "The festival needs a consensus, so some- 
times movies that are really dark or controver- 
sial might displease or horrify certain members 
of the festival," says Burnett, whose Red Meat 
was rejected by the festival. "Whereas In the 
Company of Men shows a beautiful deaf woman 
who is truly the victim of male treachery, 
women in my. film are active participants in 
their own abuse. That can be very painful to 
watch and very offensive to many women." 

Red Meat was screened at the Writers Guild 



in L.A. in September 1996, resulting in several 
distributors coming forward. "Their offers were 
totally exploitative, maybe a release in one or 
two cities. And we heard over and over, 'How 
do we market it.'"' says Burnett. "What I found 
out is that it's more difficult to sell a good, seri- 
ous, independent film than it is to create one. 
In fact it's brutal. There's so much luck and art 
involved in selling it." Fortunately, Burnett had 
some luck. Greenberg was in the audience at 
the WGA screening and loved the film. 

"The Sundance Channel is much more will- 
ing to take risks, and it doesn't require such a 
widespread consensus," says Burnett. "Liz 
Manne is absolutely fearless and not lily-liv- 
ered. She's not frightened of controversy or 
taking a chance." 

The channel took a chance with at least one 
film that had already been a political hot pota- 
to in the halls of Congress. After winning the 
Teddy Award at the Berlin Film Festival, 
Watermelon Woman was mired in controversy 
sparked by an article in the conservative 
Washington Times about the film and its $3 1,500 
grant from the National Endowment for the 
Arts. Jesse Helms described the film (sight 



unseen) as "flotsam floating in the sewer." 
During hearings over NEA appropriations, 
Michigan Republican Congressman Peter 
Hoekstra called for an amendment decreasing 
the NEA's budget by $31,500. 

Ultimately First Run Features did a limited 
theatrical release of the film in 1997, and later 
made the deal with the Sundance Channel, 
which aired Watermelon Woman last August as 
part of a "Representing Soul" festival featuring 
the works of 13 African Americans. 

The channel has also run a Chinese Indie 
Film Festival and in general makes abundant 
use of programmatic themes. It has featured a 
"Parker Poses" series (films with indie actress 
Parker Posey); a line-up of dysfunctional family 
films on Thanksgiving Day; gay-themed films 
on World Aids Day; and shorts on the shortest 
day of the year. "The themes, trends, and pack- 
aging decisions emerge out of the choosing, not 
the other way around," says Manne. 

Interstitial programming has also become a 
bigger part of the channel's identity. The chan- 
nel has produced short segments on "Actors 
Behind the Camera" and collaborated with 
GLAAD on four editorials on the History of 



24 THE IND-ENDENT January/February 1999 



Gay Cinema that aired during Gay Pride 
Month. A weekly foray into current indepen- 
dent film news — what's in release, what's not, 
as well as filmmaker profiles — premiered this 
fall, produced hy Adam Pincus. 

Subscriber growth 

Fueling these programming efforts are gains the 
channel has made in cable subscribers. In a few 
short years, the Sundance Channel has almost 
caught up with the Independent Film Channel 
(IFC), which reaches 15 million homes. Among 
the major markets, the Sundance Channel is 
now in Los Angeles, Boston, Marin County 
(north of San Francisco), Houston, and New 
York. Redford was instrumental in the deal with 
Time Warner Cable in Manhattan, where the 
Sundance Channel is available every Sunday 
for a monthly or yearly subscription. 

"Our carriage limitations in the past — not 
being on-air in New York and L.A. — really 
affected our ability to expand and do more," 
says Harbeck. "But now we've got those mar- 
kets; we're in the face of so many members of 
the creative community, and we'll continue to 
expand what we do." 

For the independent world, what singles out 
the Sundance Channel is its support for films 
that the rest of the movie world had pro- 
nounced unmarketable. "Independent film dis- 
tributors are becoming the minor league of the 
Hollywood studio system, and that's unfortu- 
nate," says Burnett. "So many independent 
films are trendy, lighthearted, derivative, and 
ingratiating because the distributors need The 
Full Monty or a Brothers McMidlen to make 
everyone smile. For those serious and truly 
artistic filmmakers aiming to have a profound 
effect, they're going to need a home — and it's 
going to be cable venues like Sundance 
Channel and HBO," continues Burnett, whose 
screenplay about racism, Bleeding Hearts, was 
turned into a film directed by Gregory Hines 
that premiered on Cinemax this fall. "The 
Sundance Channel gave clear and unambiva- 
lent support to Red Meat all the way through," 
he says. "The executives even helped me find a 
distributor for its theatrical release." He con- 
cludes, "The Sundance Channel is the wave of 
the future." 

Cheryl Dunye concurs: "As an independent 

filmmaker, to know that the Sundance Channel 

exists makes me hopeful." 

Shelley Gabert is a freelance writer living in St. Louis, 
who wrote about cable in the Dec. '97 issue on HBO. 

Meet Tom Harbeck and Liz Manne at AIVF's 
February Meet & Greet! See @AIVF (page 60) for 
details. 




nf rFnTiNq . 



tHeA 



TO 



AVID RENTALS 



MC 8000-1000-400 

PRO-TOOLS 

DVC PRO-DECK 



EXCELLENT TECH SUPPORT 



m 

(productions) 

212.741.9155 




Avid MC90Q0, MC1DOO 
Film Composer, Xpness Plus 
off/on-line AVR77 S. 3D DVE 
Digital Betacam, Digital I/O 
DVCPRD, 3/4 SP, HIS & VHS 



transfers & duplication Crush available] 



Macintosh graphics & After Effects compositing 
tape to disk [Jazz, Zip, Syquest, CD-R) 
web site design Si maintenance 

Betacam SP & DV field packages 

offering special ra-^es fcr ar-rjs"ts and i^ecenden-T_s since . "-! 

212.523.S204 

D V 8 V I D E / 738 8R0RDWRV / PENTHOUSE / NYC 10003 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 25 



THE FACTS IN BLACK 8c WHITE 




by Lynn M . Ermann 



hen The General screened 

at Cannes, festival -goers all agreed: great movie, distribution sui- 
cide. John Boorman s biographical story of Martin Cahill, while witty and 
moving, was also in black and white. This was a risky choice even for 
Boorman, who is often considered the greatest living British director. 



There is still an overwhelming bias in the industry against black- 
and-white films. Yes, there has recently been a spate of highly publi- 
cized success stories: Pi, TwentyFourSeven, The Cruise, Following, 
Celebrity. And The General was eventually picked up by Sony Classics. 
Yet these are the exceptions. "There is a feeling that black and white 
may be chic again, but it is still a tough sell," says Charlotte Mickie, 
vice president of independent films and acquisitions at Alliance 
Atlantis Corporation in Toronto, Canada. There are countless tales of 
black-and-white films that were highly lauded on the festival circuit, 
but struggled for distribution. Not one of the black-and-white films at 
the 1997 Independent Feature Film Market has found a distributor. 

Fact is, the average filmmaker — not Spielberg, Woody, or 
Boorman — needs to think hard before shooting in black and white. 
"You really have an uphill struggle," says Boorman (Deliverance, Hope 
and Glory), who adds that he "won't do it again in a hurry." Going this 
route involves difficulties at all stages, not just distribution but also 
financing, production, and postproduction. 

The core problem is audience attitudes (or perceived attitudes). 
The industry party-line goes like this: Until studios went completely to 
color in the late sixties, audiences were used to seeing their movies in 
black and white. Now audiences don't have the patience. "Black and 
white is still seen by most people as an oddity, " says George Lentz, 
director of film acquisitions for the Independent Film Channel. It just 
doesn't play in Peoria. "Turn on the TV and see something in black and 
white, and [the average viewer] will think it is boring and difficult," 
says Mickie. The medium makes an audience 'work.' It has become a 
symbol for three things: artsy, classic, historical. Pleasantville, the 
Turneresque story of a fifties TV-land that goes to color, says it all: 
black and white is drab and dead, color is beautiful and alive. And can 
anyone forget the Federal Hill fiasco? More recently, cynical Gus Van 
Sant even banked on the public's supposed dislike of black-and-white 
movies. His (is it really his?) Psycho is a shot-by-shot exact duplicate of 



the original, only in color. As he told Movieline, "Why not redo in color 
a brilliant successful film nobody's seeing because it's in black and 
white?" 

But indie films don't play in Peoria, so Joe i want my color TV 
doesn't count. Not exactly. The problem is that video and television 
buyers, for the most part, are vehemently resistant to black and white. 
The only television opportunities for black-and-white films are on 
channels like the Independent Film Channel or the Sundance 
Channel, and Arte overseas. All of these pay much less (perhaps 
$40,000 less) than the biggies. Plus there are "fewer and fewer [televi- 
sion programs] around" that deal with black and white, according to 
Mickie. (An odd historical note: According to David A. Cook's A 
History of Narrative Film, television led to the decline in color film pro- 
duction between 1955 and 1958 due to the fact that television was in 
black and white, and studios were targeting that market.) 

Video is an even tougher sell. It is "really a mass market" medium, 
according to Amy Sprecher, vice president of acquisitions and produc- 
tion at Polygram Video, which handles more 'esoteric' titles like Fargo 
or The Usual Suspects. Smaller video companies like New Video and 
Fox Lorber handle some black-and-white titles. Television buyers here 
and overseas tend to share this attitude. Foreign output deals often 
exclude black-and-white films, according to Michael Stremel, New 
York director of productions at Fox Searchlight Pictures. (This means 
that companies will buy all of Searchlight's films only if they don't 
include any black-and-white pics.) 

Without an ancilliary market safety net in place, most distributors 
don't want to take a chance. Another deterrent is the high price of 
making black-and-white prints for theatrical releases. Black-and-white 
film is thinner, so the prints wear out more quickly (which was appar- 
ently a major problem when Schindler's List was in the theaters). For 
the most part, "the only companies open to embracing black-and- 
white films are the little ones," says Artisan executive vice president 



26 THE INDEPENDENT January /February 1999 



John Hegeman. Artisan picked up two black-and-white films last year: 
Pi and The Cruise. Many small indie -friendly distributors face a Catch 
22: they want to pick up black-and-white films, but 
they also need to stay in business and "don't have 
the power to get [the film] out there," according to 
Megan O'Neil, vice president of Forefront Films. 

To insure the success of the film, a company must 
be able to launch a significant marketing campaign, 
which is costly. Filmmaker Darren Aronofsky came 
up with a cheap, guerrilla-style publicity campaign 
using spray paint and the universal 71 symbol. It was 
an approach Artisan subsequently exploited, turn- 
ing Pi into a "destination movie" that hipsters want- 
ed to be seen seeing, according to John Pierson, who h^hh 
once helped get the black-and-white She's Gotta 
Have It and Stranger than Paradise out of the station. O'Neil says that 
"a black-and-white film has to be really special for us to pick it up." 
They were lucky; Pi has done phenomenally in the theaters, grossing 
over $3 million in 15 weeks. 



GETTING FINANCING FOR A BLACK-AND-WHITE FILM IS AN EVEN TOUGHER 
prospect. Mark Tusk, senior vice president of productions at New Line 
says, "No one in their right mind working in this industry would back 
a black-and-white film." The seasoned Boorman did his own financing: 



Black-and-white 

makes an audience 

"work/ It has become 

a symbol (or three 

things: artsy, classic, 

historical. 



"If [The General] had been for a studio, they probably wouldn't have 
let me do the film," he explains. Paul Griffin, director of the much 
acclaimed (but still floating) LaMastas, lost his first 
backer who said he wouldn't give him the $500,000 
if they shot in black and white. Griffin declined the 
offer and took another year to get the funds. The 
Good Machine execs couldn't recall one black-and- 
white film that they had ever produced. 

The same indie business that nurtured so many 
up-and-coming filmmakers is also getting mighty 
cutthroat. Back in 1992, producer Steve Hegyes 
sold a black-and-white film to German television, 
but says they definitely wouldn't buy it today. 
^^m Nowadays, a good (but not spectacular) black-and- 

white comedy will be knocked out of the running by 
a color one at the same level. A case in point is Hegyes' Live Bait, a 
comedy that won the Toronto City Award but couldn't find a distribu- 
tor. "One distributor said to me that if it had been in color, he would 
buy it on the spot" and that black and white was for experimental films 
or dramas. For Black and White and Red All Over, the fact that it was 
shot in black and white (mixed with some color) may have been the 
final strike against the film. "We also had black people in the film, and 
none of them were lead actors," explains DeMaine Davis and Khari 
Streeter, cowriters and directors. While you never know for sure why a 
film has been rejected, being in black and white doesn't help. 




immigrant life in New 
thematically & stylisti 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 27 




took a really long time." Since there's competition for limited 
resources, development can take a week or more. "Everything is 
geared towards color," says Boorman. The only way to cut costs 
is to shoot on 16mm, which means that you will be paying later 
to blow it up to 35mm. 

Shooting in black and white is also a sizable technical chal- 
enge. "It is more complex 

and time consuming," accord- m ^^^^^^^ m 

ing to Boorman. "It is also 
something of a lost art." How 
many cameramen out there 
are proficient in black-and- 
white cinematography? Does 
anyone know the tricks of the 



The development 
process, which 
involves spraying 
rather than soak- 
ing the negatives, 
allows for greater 
control. You can fix 
a lot of mistakes. 



In fact, black and white isn't even cheap these days. Remember 
when it used to be the starving students' medium? Now due to the 
shrinking market in black-and-white films, only two major labs — 
DuArt in New York City and Alpha Cine in Seattle — have the right 
equipment to deal with black-and-white film. (Technicolor in New 
York Cits' is now starting to develop black-and-white film as well.) 
While the stock is still cheaper and black-and-white development is 
about the same price as color (14 cents per foot), there are hidden 
costs. "There are more answer prints to get it right," says Griffin. "It 



trade anymore? Boorman had to 
turn to cameraman Seamus 
Deasy who "was old enough to 
have shot a lot of black-and- 
white before color came along, 
and he began to dust off his old 
technique." In black-and-white 
the background and foreground 
can blend together. "In color 
you can create depth with the 
colors; a guy is in a green shirt 
standing in front of a gray wall; 
in black and white this blends together," 
says Elia Lyssy, DP on LaMastas. "You 
have to separate the planes and use lots 
of shots with backlighting," according 
to Boorman. Exposure is also key, 
according to Kent McGrew, a color 
timer at DuArt Film & Video who is 
known for his proficiency with black- 
and-white stock. "If it is underexposed 
by one stop, it falls apart," says 
McGrew. 

With all these obstacles, there is still a 
great reason to shoot in black and 
white: the story can't be told any other 
way. "[The General] was about very 
recent events, about people who are still alive," explains Boorman. "I 
wanted to make it a distancing effect, to take it away from the imme- 
diate reality, and that is what black and white suggests." Furthermore 
it adds a "mythic dimension" to the film and to Cahill himself. 
Likewise, it is hard to imagine the black-and-white film La Ciudad, an 
earnest and touching portrayal of Latin American immigrant life, any 
other way. It is "simply a part of the fabric of the film," says director 
David Riker. It works well with the Neorealist style and message of this 



28 THE INDEPENDENT January February 1999 




ITVS -funded film. In The Cruise, black and 
white gives New York City a stunning grandeur 
like that described by the tour guide in the film. 

"The subject asks you to see things through different eyes," says direc- 
tor Bennett Miller. "Black and white does the same thing." Pi too cre- 
ates a new language with black and white: a fast-cutting, almost MTV 
style that we don't usually see with this medium. It too needs to be in 
black and white. 

There are advantages to using black-and-white film as well. 
"Shooting in black and white gives you some easy beauty for your dol- 
lar," says Eric Tretbar, producer and director of Snow, a black-and- 
white film that played at the Toronto Film Festival. It reduces the cost 
of production design because you can "shoot on location without con- 
trolling all of the elements of the background," agrees Riker. With a 
film that portrays bleak poverty, it can also give a kind of grandeur to 
surroundings that would look just plain seedy in color. "If you're deal- 
ing with the kind of floral wallpaper [in the Irish slum in The General] 
and things that these people like, it's ghastly in color," says Boorman. 
Plus you have some advantages with black and white on the develop- 
ment end. The process, which involves spraying rather than soaking 
the negatives, allows for greater control. You can fix a lot of mistakes. 

The trick is to start seeing in black and white. Riker suggests taking 
black-and-white Polaroids of the scenes in advance to get a feel for the 
medium. Or you can watch your TV in black and white like Griffin, so 
you can see how colors translate on the screen. 

Another alternative is to shoot half black-and-white and half color, 
which opens up the film a bit more for distribution. Many filmmakers 
are now playing with draining the color out of color film, so it has a 



muted effect like in Saving Private Ryan or Lars 
von Trier's The Kingdom. Printing color onto 
black-and-white stock is another route and is 
also complex. Boorman actually shot The General this way. (He had no 
intention of staying with color.) In the Company of Men was shot the 
same way with the same intention — LaBute was going to print on 
black and white. The film was submitted to Sundance in black and 
white, but shown at the festival in color. In the interlude, LaBute and 
his producer agonized over the decision. Ultimately they decided to go 
with color because "it is easier to distribute and a little more accessible 
to audiences," says In the Company of Men producer Stephen Pevner. 
Fortunately for them, the film, even though it was lit for black-and- 
white, looks fine in color. 

"If you make a film worth something, eventually it finds a place," 
says John Cooper, associate director of programming at Sundance. The 
Independent Film Channel's Lentz, for example, recently picked up a 
film that he saw at the festival, "one of those small character studies 
that falls through the cracks, and the fact that it was in black and 
white didn't help distributors." Mr. Vincent premiered on IFC in 
December. Black and White and Red All Over also found a home recent- 
ly: it was picked up by Spectrum Video and is sold at Blockbusters 
everywhere and will screen on the BET Movie channel. "I would do it 
again [in black and white] if I had to," says Davis. 

Lynn Ermann is a freelance writer in New York City. She Iws written for the 
Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and the New York Daily News, 

among other publications. 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 29 




ithout a doubt, 1998 was a breakthrough year for digital filmmaking. Makers took 
notice as digital video (DV) projects such as Thomas Vinterberg's The Celebration 
and Bennett Miller's documentary The Cruise secured theatrical releases from 
major distributors (October Films and Artisan Entertainment respectively). 
Miramax released Michael Moore's The Big One, which included DV footage. 



Zeitgeist unveiled Ulrike Koch's powerful DV documentary, The 
Saltmen of Tibet. Stefan Avalos and Lance Weiler's feature The Last 
Broadcast and Tommy Pallotta and Bob Sahiston's short Roadhead 
broke through via less mainstream outlets (both were showcased on 
the popular ResFest tour, and The Last Broadcast was released in art- 
houses by satellite delivery to digital projectors). Paul Wagner's dra- 
matic feature Windhorse, shot surreptitiously in Tibet with a palm-sized 
DV camera, screened at the Florida, Toronto and Hawaii film festivals 
in 1998. 

These works are no longer an anomaly. The level of interest in 
DV among filmmakers of all stripes is picking up speed, as was 
clearly evident during a panel on the subject during last 
fall's Independent Feature Film Market in New York 
About one third of the audience raised its hand when 
asked how many had used digital video. And this audi- 
ence had very specific and detailed questions — about 
aspect ratios, in-camera effects, the pros and cons of 
various manufacturers' cameras, and post require- 
ments. Clearly, many were already knee -deep into 
it. If 1998 seemed a boom year for DV, it's safe to 
say we ain't seen nothing yet. 

Two of the people in that room fielding questions 
were panelist Todd Verow, an underground filmmak- 
er who has made three digital features in less than 18 
months, and editor Steve Hamilton, a longtime col- 
laborator with Hal Hartley. For his most recent pro- 
ject, the hour-long The Book of Life, Hartley opted to 
shoot on digital video. Both Verow and Hamilton 
offered no-nonsense explanations of the digital film- 
making process at IFFM and subsequently agreed to 
talk with The Independent about their experiences. 



H 



"^*. 



Ial Hartley caught the eye of 

THE indie world following the 
debut of his feature film 
The Unbelieveable Truth in 
1989, and he has influ- 
enced countless makers 
over the past decade with 

such acclaimed features as Trust, Simple Men, Flirt, and 
Henry Fool. A true member of the vanguard within the 
nineties alternative film scene, he is now poised to 
have an impact on a new generation of filmmakers 

30 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



with The Book of Life, a stylized take on the year 2000 and the end of 
the world. The Book of Life came about after an invitation from French 
television channel La Sept/Arte. Hartley was the American selected to 
participate in their series on the upcoming Millennium, dubbed "2000 
Seen by . . ." Filmmakers from various countries were asked to create 
something set on the last day of the Millennium — New Year's Eve 
2000. Since Hartley had already been working on a play about 
Christian Millennialists, the coincidence was perfect. Hartley was pre- 
sented with a modest budget and, given what he wanted to do, 
decided the only way to go was with digital video. (It took 
some persuading to convince Arte, which preferred 
film.) 

"Aesthetics and economics have a lot to do with 
each other, and I see no need for that to be a 
drag," Hartley explained in an interview 
accompanying press materials for The Book of 
Life. "It is hard to make 
work that is not com- 
fortable within 
the realms of 
acceptable 
behavior 
unless you 
make it for 
almost no 

money. Okay, 
I'm not going to 
roll over and die. 
I'm going to figure 
out how to make 
work that interests 
me — in a way that 
interests me — for 
small amounts of 
cash. I actually 
experiment. 
Trying to find 
what it is this 
new medium 
does well and 
how those 
things that it 
does well 
cause me to 





change my habits 
of working." 

Longtime 
Hartley actor 

Martin Donovan 
and acclaimed 
rocker RJ. Harvey 
star as Jesus and Magdalena in a 
rough interpretation of the Book of 
Revelation set on the eve of the 
turn of the century in New York 
City. After Jesus and Magdalena 
arrive in the city, they encounter 
the Devil himself and Jesus struggles 
with his own prophesied responsibil- 
ities as the end of the world 
approaches. Employing a driving 
electronic soundtrack that is pep- 
pered with music by RJ. Harvey, 
David Byrne, and Yo La Tengo, 

Hartley tweaked the shutter speed on his Sony DVX-1000 to create 
boldly colorful streaking images that provide dreamlike shots and 
underscore the project's would-be prophetic subject matter. As New 
York Times critic Stephen Holden wrote, "Shot on digital video, blown 
up to 35mm film, pastel-hued and filled with feathery digital afterim- 
ages, the movie has a floating, ethereal look that oddly matches its 
lofty subject." 

One stylistic trait that DV enables is a wider variety of color tem- 
peratures within a shot. "In most films there's a tremendous amount of 
energy spent on creating lighting continuity," says Hamilton, "with gels 
and florescents used to carefully control the color temperatures. "Here 
[in The Book of Life], the tendency is to let color temps do what they 
do. There might be three different temperatures from different light 
sources in a single room." 

That's a difficult feat on film, because the effect can't be seen until 
dailies are processed. While some film directors take the risk (like the 
ever- adventurous Wong Kar-Wai), "color continuity is the safe way to 
go," says Hamilton. But DV provides a safety net. "You can monitor it 
in real time; you can see it. In film, you're never quite sure how it's 
going to match up. DV allows you more freedom; you can be more 
experimental, because you can see if you're fucking up." 

In addition to such stylistic flourishes, DV also enabled Hartley to 
adopt a shooting style that he had long been dreaming about, one that 
enabled him to pare down his crew to a bare minimum. On his 35mm 
features, Hartley used "easily 30 to 40 people," according to Hamilton. 
With The Book of Life, there were only seven or eight, sometimes less, 
and no lock-ups on location. "Hal and I had spoken about it for years," 
says Hamilton, and they eyed the work of director Jon Jost as a model. 
"We've always really strived for self-dependence and empowerment," 
he says. A small crew "allows you to be more flexible, with a longer 
rehearsal period. It lends itself to a more cohesive and focused art." 



D 



V'S LOW COST, COMPACT SIZE, AND THE FLEXIBILITY AND MOBILITY 
this allows are also factors that led Todd Verow to enthusiastically 
embrace digital video. Cinematographer on Jon Moritsugu's Terminal 
USA and Mod Fuck Explosion, Verow debuted as a feature director with 
Frisk, which he shot on film and which screened in Sundance, Berlin, 



and Toronto. Verow and producing/writing partner Jim Dwyer 
launched their Boston-based Bangor Films in 1997 with their first 
video feature, Little Shots of Happiness. Shot on Hi-8 and bumped to 
16mm for a screening in the Forum section at the Berlin Film Festival, 
Little Shots was the first in Verow's "Addiction Trilogy." Part two is 
Shucking the Curve, which previewed at the New York Underground 
Film Festival, and part three, The Truth about Perpetual Deja Vu, 
wrapped late last summer in Cape Cod. Also recently wrapped is the 
'80s teen feature, A Sudden Loss of Gravity, set in Verow's hometowns 
of Bangor and Brewer, Maine. He has a number of other digital projects 
up his sleeve (he hopes to finish 10 by the year 2000). 

"I started out with the idea of shooting a feature project in video as 
a way of working with the actors more intimately," Verow explains. By 
working without a crew, "[I was] able to do a lot of improvisation and 
work in real locations." Verow's crew is even smaller than Hartley's; he 
is usually on set with just Jim Dwyer and editor Jared Dubrino. 

Striving for fictional narratives that "feel real," Verow uses video to 
"document" the actors' characters. "Video speaks to us in the image 
and style of the evening news and the soap opera," he explains in "A 
Statement on Digital Video and Indie-Wood," published on his com- 
prehensive website [www.bangorfilms.com]. "As Americans raised in a 
totally televised, up-to-the minute, live global history, video is the syn- 
thesis of reality. When we see video, we see 'truth' in a way that film 
once conveyed as newsreels." 

What's more, "Because it's just me and the actors," Verow tells The 
Independent, "[bystanders] don't think we're making a movie, so they 
don't look at the camera; they just think I am a tourist. That is a real- 
ly great advantage with shooting on video." 

Generally shooting in sequence, Verow often uses only available 
light and handheld camera. Without the crew and time-outs for light- 
ing, "It is easier to get more intimate with the characters and to feel 
like you're really there with them," he says. "The camera becomes sort 
of another character because of the way I shoot it." These shifts are a 
major departure for Verow, who previously handled lighting duties on 
Gregg Araki's Totally Fucked Up. Like Hartley, Verow clearly experi- 
ments with color temps — sometimes to indicate the altered states of 
his actors. By changing the frame rate and "pushing the gate," Verow 
manipulated the look and affected the lighting in Deja Vu. 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 31 




For sound, 
V e r o w 
keeps it 
equally sim- 
ple and 
pared 
down. He 
simply uses 
a shotgun 
m i c 
attached to 
the top of 

his camera. While admitting that he has considered getting a sound 
person, Verow ultimately felt that it was "better for me to have the 
freedom to move around. A lot of the times when I am shooting, I 
don't know where I am going to end up, because I am involved with 
the scene. So I decided it would be cumbersome to have a sound per- 
son there. [The sound] is not as good as it could be with someone 
booming, but that is a compromise I am willing to make to have the 
freedom. 

"I think it's great that people are going to be able to make movies 
now that weren't able to before," Verow states. "They can get a really 
cheap camera and edit it on their computer. They don't have to rely on 
anyone else to do it." 



Like most DV converts, Hamilton is optimistic when imagining 

the potential for work shot digitally. "I just wouldn't be surprised if film 
began to propagate in the ways that techno music has," he says. "I 
would hope that what it does is inspire people to not be so theatrical 
feature release focused. If the proper distribution channels support 
this, then we've got a new revolution in independent filmmaking." 
(On that note, Hamilton thinks the The Book of Life screens best on a 
25" monitor. Although he's happy with the 35mm blow-up shown at 
the New York Film Festival, "it was designed to be seen on TV. I think 
the best screening was the one for the actors, when everyone was 
crammed into my studio watching it on monitors.") Hamilton suggests 
that filmmakers try to see DV as a new medium, with its own proper- 
ties. "Hal was trying to explore that new medium; this mini-DV medi- 
um has a different texture to it, so a different sensibility is in order." 

Verow concurs. "You just have to think of it as a different medium. 
You can't mix your oils and acrylics, because it is going to fall apart." 
He, too, cautions, "A lot of people just see it as a cheap, easy way to 
get their movie done, but really they want their project to be in film. 
They talk about things like doing a 'film look' in the computer. But if 
you really want your film to be on film, you are never going to be sat- 
isfied [with DV], so just wait and try to get enough money to make it 
on film." Perhaps best summing up the way in which digital production 
has inspired some makers, Hamilton says. "[It is] enabling me to recon- 
nect with the avant garde or the alternative — having always eschewed 
the term 'independent.' To me, it's a road back into what feels new and 
exciting and revolutionary." 

Eugene Hernandez is co-founder & editor m chief of indieWIRE, as well as a staffer 
at AWE where he is coordinating the organization's new Internet site [www.aivf.org]. 

See The Book of Life and partake in a discussion with its key creative team as 
part of AIVFs new events series: Up Close: Conversations with Filmmakers. 
See @ AIVF (page 60) for details. 




While producing The Book of Life, producer Matt Myers created a pro- 
duction diary subtitled How to Make a Digital Video Feature. Intended as 
an internal document to help them keep the process straight, the diary 
can serve as a convenient user's guide for others embarking on this new 
set of procedures. 

Shooting on location in New York City with a Sony DVX-1000 handy- 
cam, Hartley maintained a small seven-person crew: Jim Denault (DP), 
Clayton Allis (gaffer), Jeff Pullman (sound), Rich Greenberg (1st AD), 
Pete Thorell (Key PA), Monica Willis (costumes), and Judy Chin (make- 
up/hair). 

Hartley and Denault utilized a Sachtler fluid-head tripod and a $100 
Cokin camera filter package along with no more grip and electrical 
equipment than would fit into a single canvas pushcart. Sound was 
recorded on DAT, and Pullman employed a Denecke time-code generator 
plugged directly into the camera. 

Dailies were created by transferring the 30 minute Sony Mini-DV cam 
cassettes to both Dl and 3/4" tapes. The offline edit was done on an 
Avid Media Composer after time-code issues were addressed. The online 
involved both an auto-conform assembly edit at DuArt with the Edit Box 
system and color correction with a DaVinci board at the digital tape-to- 
tape phase. This is a more cost effective option than color correction 
during the transfer to film or at the answer print phase. 

Sound was edited and mixed from the DAT masters. The optical 
negative was shot with DATs running at video speed to accommodate 
the transfer to film at the Sony High Def Center in Los Angeles. The 
nine-day Sony process began with the up-conversion to High Definition, 
followed by a conversion from 30 fps to 24 fps for film. According to 
the production diary, by using a proprietary algorithm, Sony's system 
accomplishes this "by mixing and throwing away fields over a series of 
frames" as opposed to the traditional method of simply removing 20% 
of the frames for the shift to film. This results in a noticable difference 
in picture quality. (Bennett Miller used the Sony process for coverting 
The Cruise to film.) 

Since the Sony DVX-1000 camera does not have a switch for the 
16:9 aspect ration, cinematographer Jim Denault made a frame for the 
viewfinder to compose shots appropriately, although this still resulted 
in losing significant vertical resolution in the tape-to-film transfer. 

According to The Book of Life diary, the initial transfer to high defin- 
ition video at Sony cost $500/hour, while the tape-to-film transfer was 
about $6 per foot (nearly $35,000 for a 63 minute movie like The Book 
of Life ). A one-light color print made at a lab in LA. cost $6,292. Total 
price for the digital video-to-film transfer: $40,612. 

— E.H. 



32 THE INDEPENDENT January/February IS 



URINC THE PA S T 1 

MEDIAMAKING HAS SEE 

The demise of 16mm as a distribution and exhibition 
format; a reduction in public funding for production; 
fewer opportunities than hoped for in the burgeon- 
ing cable television world. 

But throughout these years, independents have 
had a 
group of 
stead- 
fast, 



though low-profile, sup- 
porters: media librarians 
like Mary Keelan, who 
enthusiastically purchase 
and promote indepen- 
dent programming for 
public libraries. Keelan 
acquires work for the Mid- 
Hudson Library System, 
where she is Director for 
Development and Resource 
Management. She search- 
es out, purchases, and 
publicizes film and video 




5 years, independent 

:n tumultuous change: 

Why is it important for the public to have access to independent media through 
libraries, versus other venues, such as television, video stores, or universities? 

If an independent film is shown on TV, it's usually a one shot deal. 
Video stores stock things that will sell or be rented and that's usually 
hot stuff. They don't like to keep things on their shelves that might not 

go out regularly. Univer- 
sities' collections are not 
available to the general 
public. In tact, the public 
library is really the only 
place I can think of 
where films are available 
free of charge — and 
where you can have a 
collection of all kinds of 
works on all kinds of sub- 
jects that would appeal to 
the diversity of any given 
community. 

What's the history of 16mm 
in the libraries? 



Checking 0u( Film with Media Librarian Mary Keelan 



by Steven Montgomery 



titles to the 7 1 local libraries in New York State that her office serves. 
Over the years, Keelan has befriended and encouraged independent 
producers in the Hudson Valley area, where she serves on the boards 
of the Millbrook Arts Group and the Hudson Valley Film and Video 
Festival. 

During the past six months the Mid-Hudson Library System has 
acquired such titles such as When Billy Broke His Head.. .and Other Tales 
of Wonder, Nobody's Business, Waco: The Rules of Engagement, A Healthy 
Baby Girl, I Shall Not be Removed: The Life of Marlon Riggs, and When 
We Were Kings. 

Yet Keelan's profession is in the midst of change as well. There is a 
national trend to decentralize library systems and media collections. 
The Mid-Hudson System's media collection would have been decen- 
tralized by now had it not been for Keelan's efforts. This change is like- 
ly to hurt independents, who have a better a chance at selling higher- 
priced work (i.e., cassettes priced above $19.95) to a centralized sys- 
tem than to a local library. In addition, media librarians' once vital 
national organization (the Educational Film Library Association, or 
EFLA) is now defunct. And enthusiasm for media collections in the 
libraries is to some degree being supplanted by the public's interest in 
new media and computers. 

In this interview Keelan gives an overview of the precarious state of 
her profession, but, most importantly, offers a vision for its future. 



16mm was programmed in libraries as long as 35 years ago. Governor 
Rockefeller was a great supporter of the arts in New York State. One 
thing libraries began to develop was huge art print collections. They 
would loan out reproductions of classic paintings. The building of 
16mm collections was somewhat analogous to that kind of service. 
Libraries were seen as places where you would have a diversity of 
materials, not just books. 

The New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) was founded 
during Rockefeller's tenure as Governor. NYSCA supported 
[libraries'] purchasing of 16mm film by independents from the late 
seventies and into the late eighties. That was very important in New 
York State, because it meant you could buy avant-garde things, you 
could take chances. 

How were films chosen back then? 

We would purchase films seen at the Flaherty Seminar, or prize win- 
ners from the American Film and Video Festival, which went on for 
days. Years ago, the distributors of independent films — Churchill, 
Bullfrog, Direct Cinema, Cinema Guild, Filmmakers Library — had 
representatives that you would meet at the film festivals. They would 
be exhibiting there. You'd get to know them. They'd come by the 
library, and you'd go over a list of films being offered for sale. There was 
a real collegial, trusting relationship. But I haven't seen a distributor's 
representative here in years. 

At one time, the public library system structure lent itself to the 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 33 



centralized buying of 16mm. 16mm was very 
expensive, ranging from $250 to $2,500 or 
more for a film. That is not possible for most 
local libraries. They were bought centrally. In 
New York State we have 23 public library sys- 
tems which service over 700 public libraries 
throughout the state. It was seen as economi- 
cal and efficient to have the centralized buy- 
ing. 

Today that's being reexamined — is that 
really a role systems should play in New York 
State? For the most part, the answer is no. 
And that is having an effect on this whole 
phenomenon of centralized media services. 
There is a movement away from supporting it 
at the central level. 

Has the buying procedure changed? 

Until a few years back, it was just the distrib- 
utors in the 16mm market that approached 
me. In the last six or seven years, you have 
production companies, distribution compa- 
nies, jobbers of materials. I used to recognize 
all their names. Now 50 percent I don't recog- 
nize. 



Send librarians a well-presented publicity package — it makes your presen- 
tation appear much more professional. 

Join the American Library Association (ALA) or any state chapter of the 
ALA — this is a good way to meet librarians. 

• The ALA holds a huge annual trade show. Get together with other film- 
makers and purchase a booth or table at ALA events to publicize your work. 

Collection development is happening electronically.. Contact state libraries 
using the web. Start with www.ALA.org 

•Involve a librarian at every stage of your production. They can save you time 
by pointing you toward reference and resource material and give you feedback 
on content and the programmability of your work. 

•Libraries are an ideal space for exhibition. Some, like the Donnell Media 
Center in New York, do regular programming, discussion, and screenings of 
independent work. 

• Librarians are trained to buy film and video from review catalogues. There 
are three journals that are widely used in the field: Booklist, Video Librarian, 
and Library Journal. Contact the reviewer or publication and send your pub- 
licity packet. You could also send a video clip on-line. 



Is this because so much cheap programming has 
been dumped on video? 

Yes. It's everything from the Arthritis Foundation making a video and 
trying to sell it to libraries, to niche companies that might have three 
videos on parenting that they're pushing. We have over 2,000 names 
of distributors and filmmakers we've bought from. 

How do filmmakers reach librarians now? 

Getting your stuff reviewed is critical because people like myself always 
read reviews. The key journals are Video Librarian, Book List, Library 
Journal, and School Library journal. In addition, I receive mail from 
every film distributor that exists. 

Are there events where filmmakers can meet librarians? 

At the American Library Association convention, there are 10-12 dis- 
tributors who exhibit collectively. Most sell independently-produced 
work. Many of my colleagues attend the National Educational Media 
Market [www.nemn.org] in Oakland. The yearly National Media 
Market [www.nmm.net] held in various cities is a market for librari- 
ans. That involves three days of previewing. This year they're meeting 
in Las Vegas. It's a good place to learn about the field. 

Should a producer target certain libraries? 

It's best to approach the library systems, the state library, or larger 
urban libraries or persons who are media librarians. In any of the big 
states, such as New York, Illinois, and California, they have systems 
which are centralized. They cover a lot of territory. 

A few years ago, in selling a film I made on Morocco to librarians, I found that 
writing a personal note got the best result, as opposed to sending just a flyer. 
Are you receptive to a letter from a filmmaker? 

I would always read a letter from a filmmaker as long as it wasn't a form 
letter. Yes, this does get my attention. 

At Christmas time my >other sent a flyer for my film to my cousins all over the 



LaTrice Dixon 
LaTrice Dixon is advocacy and membership associate at AIVF 



U.S. Many of them recommended the film to their local librarians. It was sur- 
prising how many ordered it. 

Really, isn't that something! We always try to respond to requests from 
patrons. I do think that the general public has a role to play in acqui- 
sitions. I have an idea on how this could work. For instance, let's say 
an independent filmmaker has something screened on television. On 
PBS sometimes you'll get a credit that says, "Call this 800 number for 
a copy of this." That's if a person wants to buy it. How about a line that 
says, "Or request it at your local library." Lots of people don't have $30 
to buy this film that was shown on TV. If you can't buy a film, request 
that your local public community library buy it; then more people can 
see it. 

In addition, what if it was part of the proposal to NEA, NEH, or 
NYSCA. 7 Why not request monies for distribution — up front? One 
portion of the funding might be used to place a copy of that film in one 
library per state. Maybe you would pick the state library where there is 
a centralized collection. 

Why do you see placement of a film in a library as so important? 

I'll give you an example. Two recent documentaries, Waco: The Rules of 
Engagement and Affluenza were both shown on television. How many 
people watched them? Well, maybe a lot, but a lot more missed them. 
These are two very important documentaries about cutting edge issues. 
Isn't it important that the public see those films? If they're not pur- 
chased by a library and made available — that's it. The film exists in 
somebody's mind who once saw it. Then it gets forgotten. These two 
films raise very important issues for discussion in a democracy. That's 
what the public libraries are about. They provide a forum for that dis- 
cussion. 

How do librarians select films in terms of subject matter? 

Libraries are into collection development. They don't buy an individ- 



34 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



ual film necessarily. They buy across the Dewey decimal system on sub- 
jects such as philosophy, religion, biography, art, dance, science, etc. 
For instance, if you made a film on Morocco, you might appeal to a 
librarians who are doing ethnic or travel collections. 

Are there subjects that are not well covered by independents? 

Children's films are always popular in libraries. It's a very neglected 
field by independent filmmakers. There's an interest in aging. And 
there's always an interest in religion. Let's face it, the United States has 
incredible religious diversity. For instance, how many films are there 
that really deal with fundamentalism — with a diversity of points of 
view? That's another thing for filmmakers to understand: libraries need 
to balance their collections by philosophy and by policy. A public 
library can't exclusively buy everything with one political point of view. 
If that librarian is doing his or her job, they're going to try to balance 
it. 

How do films on controversial issues fare in library acquisition? 

We started a video health information project in 1987, [which includ- 
ed] documentaries on substance abuse, mental health, nutrition, preg- 
nancy, etc. It also happened to coincide with the period of the rising 
consciousness about AIDS. There were no ratings on these films, 
which were educational, but some were sexually explicit. As a way to 
deal with potential controversy, I invited the authority on intellectual 
freedom from the American Library Association, Judith Krug, to give a 
workshop on video and intellectual freedom, specifically focusing on 
the video health materials. This was a very big workshop — mostly 
attended by library directors. But there were also a number of trustees. 
And the role of trustees in relation to collection development is not to 
be diminished; they help set up policy and budgets. So the presentation 
was made with a number of videos that we thought might raise ques- 
tions. One was a very explicit video on the use of the condom with a 
banana being used for demonstration purposes. Another, Death of a 
Pom Queen, was a very moving film about what happens to a young 
woman who gets involved in the drug scene. But it has some scenes in 
it that were explicit. The films were discussed very thoughtfully in 
terms of intellectual freedom. At the end of this session, I was standing 
in the back with three of our trustees. Two are from the Catskills area. 
I didn't know what their philosophy was, but I thought it was probably 
very, very conservative. They came up to me and thanked me for this 
presentation and thought it was one of the best things we had done. It 
contextualized collection development in a broader way, and I think it 
gained a tremendous amount of support for the development of the 
collection. 

Will decentralization of collections affect the acquisition of films on controver- 
sial subjects? 

This is a real concern of mine. In moving the purchasing of video to 
the local level, the librarian and board is much more vulnerable to con- 
troversy and censorship. So you get self-censorship. You get librarians 
not purchasing films on controversial subjects so as to avoid any prob- 
lems. There's a lot of stuff that has come out of the gay community that 
deals with controversial issues. We as a centralized system might be 
able to purchase some of that, because they're terrific films. It's highly 
unlikely that would be purchased at the local level. 

What can help strengthen your field for the future? 

We need new equipment. Years ago, if you bought a certain number of 
16mm films, the distributors used to give you projectors. In the early 
days of video, they would give you VCRs. Today that is not happening 



at all. For video, we need good large-screen projection systems. People 
don't want to come and look at television in the library. People in your 
field should be helping to recommend and influence the manufactur- 
ers to donate video projectors to the libraries. 

What are your other ideas for the future? 

In 1983 I was project manager for the New York State Union Catalog 
for Film and Video (NYSCAT), funded by NYSCA. It pulled together 
an extraordinary catalog of films in all of the collections of the Library 
systems in New York State, including descriptions of each. The purpose 
was to share the 16mm collections. Films were sitting on the shelf 
because they weren't known about. 

Could this project be done again? 

It wouldn't take a lot to create a union catalogue of New York State. 
One could create a search engine that could pull down quickly all the 
films and videos that are available in all the public libraries. It would 
be a service to the patron to not have to look through millions of 
records — including records of books — to find a video. Instead, they 
could search in a format- specific collection. 

It would help filmmakers. They could see who owns their film: one 
library or three hundred. They could see if someone has made a film on 
the Adirondacks, for instance. Are there 50 films on that subject or 
nothing? You could see which films are in distribution, which are not. 

Right now, there is no across-the-web search engine that is exclu- 
sively for independent film and video. There's no way to search into all 
the nooks and crannies of the independent film world. I think there's 
a real need for that. It's do-able. I propose putting together a coalition 
of people — librarians, educators, filmmakers, university people — and 
come up with a way to approach this so that it would be easy and use- 
ful. 

What about the next generation? 

We've created a pilot project called Teenage Interns Video Reviewers. 
Last summer we had 36 teenagers who were paid interns at local 
libraries and were trained in reviewing films. They reviewed all of our 
collection to weed out things that were out of date. This year the 
teenagers evaluated a hundred tapes on health-related issues. The sub- 
text is not just about getting teenagers busy in libraries for the summer, 
but it's also about a new generation connecting with the library and 
film, and that it isn't just the video store that provides film. 

How would you place the importance of independent film and video to our cul- 
ture? 

It's very important. The whole culture is coopted by commercialism 
and the bottom line. The independent filmmaker provides an oppor- 
tunity for a broader-based look at things. We're talking about democ- 
racy. We're talking about a culture that's incredibly diverse. The inde- 
pendent can take the risks that commercial producers cannot because 
they're being driven by marketing. And marketing shouldn't drive what 
a film is about. There's a real need to explore other ways of looking at 
things and issues. It's a big world. We have to break out of the insular- 
ity and have a sense of the global. 

Steven Montgomery has produced the documentaries Hobie's Heroes and 

Morocco: The Past and Present of Djemma el Fna. From 1983- 1990, he studied 

the Aesthetic Realism of Eli Siegel, a philosophy concerning mankind's relationship 

to the world. 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 35 







i'SffP 



3t began almost as a lark. 
Sireb of tl)e routines of tf)e filmmaking 




process, four Danish directors decided to set themselves a challenge. "We talked about all that bored us in filmaking, 
all that we normally do — and then we forbade it. It was liberating," recalls 29-year-old director Thomas Vinterberg, 
one of the authors of what's grandiosely dubbed "Dogma 95." 
In a half-hour's time, the quartet came up with 10 "Vows of Chastity." No artificial lighting, no manipulative 
musical scores, no historical settings or genre films. Absolutely no guns. Only location shooting and hand-held 
cameras are permitted. "Dogma 95 desires to purge film, so that once again the inner lives of characters justify the 
plot," proclaimed the four, who include Vinterberg and Lars van Trier 
(whose Dogma creation The Idiots opens this spring). 

Qvery Sogma $as %ts Say 

Last fall, the first of the Dogma films burst out of the gate: Vinterberg's dysfunctional family drama, The 
Celebration. The vows behind this highly praised film might have been forgotten except for the pains taken by 
Vinterberg to play the Dogma card. The Celebration opens with an ornate certificate before the credits, certifying its 
status as a bona fide Dogma 95 film. Vinterberg even submitted a "Confession" about his lapses from the Vows of 
Chastity. (It's in this plea for absolution that one catches the self-mocking humor of the endeavor — an essential 
ingredient that seemed to elude many critics who get stuck on the filmmakers' gleeful arrogance.) 
The lark is now full of Pomp and Circumstance. But what's important to remember is Dogma 95's impetus. 
"We felt the routines and normalcy of filmmaking created laziness, rather than freshness," says Vinterberg. 
"This is about making a renewal." It's about undressing filmmaking of its conventions and 
forcing oneself as a director to think anew. 
"This has taught me that going all the way, making some sort of risk, is how I want to make films," says Vinterberg. 
"I'm not sure I'm able to every time. But it has been very inspiring." 
In that spirit, The Independent asked a number of feature directors to put forth their own Dogmas. 
All have created work that challenges the tone, narrative structure, or production techniques of conventional cine- 
ma. And all, we hope, will inspire others to take the risks they choose. 
— Patricia Thomson 













W^^. -y ■*-: : : : : I 




^^--'ii^SiL--- _^^ - ^^ Sv ^iiiJ> /A <^ ' _ 




dogma 95: The Vow of Chastity 



I swear to submit to the following set of rules drawn up and con- 
firmed by Dogma 95: 

1. Shooting must be done on location. Props and sets must not be 
brought in. (If a particular prop is necessary for the story, a location 
must be chosen where this prop is to be found.) 

2. The sound must never be produced apart from the images or vice 
versa. (Music must not be used unless it occurs where the scene is 
being shot.) 

3. The camera must be hand-held. Any movement or immobility 
attainable in the hand is permitted. (The film must not take place 
where the camera is standing; shooting must take place where the 



film takes place.) 

4- The film must be in color. Special lighting is not acceptable. (If 
there is too little light for exposure, the scene must be cut or a single 
lamp be attached to the camera.) 

5. Optical work and filters are forbidden. 

6. The film must not contain superficial action. (Murders, weapons, 
etc., must not occur.) 

7. Temporal and geographical alienation are forbidden. (That is to 
say that the film takes place here and now.) 

8. Genre movies are not acceptable. 

9. The film format must be Academy 35mm. 



36 THE INDEPENDENT January February 1999 



10. The director must not be credited. 

Furthermore, I swear as a director to refrain from personal taste! I am 
no longer an artist. I swear to refrain from creating a "work," as I 
regard the instant as more important that the whole. My supreme 
goal is to force the truth out of my characters and settings. I swear to 
do so by all the means available and at the cost of any good taste and 
any aesthetic considerations. 

Thus I make my VOW OF CHASTITY. 
Copenhagen, Monday 13 March 1995 
Lars von Trier Thomas Vmterberg* 

• Vinterberg wrote the following after completion of The Celebration, the first "Dogma 
95" film with a theatrical release: 

Confession 

As one of the Dogma 95 brethren and co-signatory of The Vow of Chastity, I feel moved 
to confess the following transgressions of the aforesaid Vow during the production of The 
Celebration. Please note that the film has been approved as a Dogma work, as only one 
genuine breach of the rules has actually taken place. The rest may be regarded as moral 
breaches. 

• I confess to having made one take with a black drape covering a window. This is not 
only the addition of a property, but must also be regarded as a kind of lighting arrange- 
ment. 

• I confess to having knowledge of a pay raise that served as cover for the purchase of 
Thomas Bo Larsen's suit for use in the film. 

• Similarly, I confess to having knowledge of purchases by Trine Dyrholm and Therese 
Glahn of the same nature. 

• 1 confess to having set in train the construction of the non-existent hotel reception 
desk for use in The Celebration, It should be noted that the structure consisted solely of 
components already present at the location. 

• I confess that Christian's mobile or cellular telephone was not his own. But it was pre- 
sent at the location. 

• I confess that in one take, the camera was attached to a microphone boom and thus 
only partially hand-held. 

I hereby declare that the rest of The Celebration was produced in accordance with The 
Vow of Chastity. Pleading for absolution, I remain 

Thomas Vmterberg 



Dogma 9 9 



Jay Anania 



"Dogma 95 seeks to strip cinema naked," explained Thomas 
Vinterberg when introducing his thoroughly engaging The Celebration 
at the Toronto International Film Festival. 

While I agree that drastic measures, dogmas even, are a fine idea, 
I think, rather, that cinema needs more clothes, not less. If these par- 
ticular dogmatic types had their way, what would be left naked would 
be, presumably, pure drama, actors performing lines unmediated by 
what I take to be the essential tools of the medium — manipulated 
light (photographic arts), acting styles ranging from naturalistic to 
stylized (dramatic arts), sound tracks blending real and foleyed 
effects, silence and the sounds of instruments and the human voice 
(musical arts), "dressed" spaces (design), speech (literary arts), and, 
most important, the experience of shifting rhythms and "times" 
(especially the glorious flashback and its impossible twin, the flashfor- 
ward), invoked by the grand shaper of all of these materials: editing 
(the essential cinematic art). 

Take away these celebrations of artifice, as Dogma 95 recom- 
mends, and you are left with . . . theater, which I prefer to see on 
stage, with live actors, in the room, actually there. Cinema, on the 
other hand, should be fully clothed, in a darkened room where no 
live actors breathe the still air lit only by the shadowy light on a 
screen, where one can see and hear a mysterious and suggestive 
blending of the numerous arts (as in artifice) that is cinema. 

]ay Ancmw is a producer, director, writer, and editor who has worked m film and television for 
more than 20 years, in forms ranging from documentary ti i experimental and dramatic 




January/February 1999 T H E I N D E P E N D E N T 37 



Matthew Harrison 

10 real-life rules of movie making that I have witnessed. 

1. Always have a dog or a cat in your movie. 

2. Never believe actors/actresses when they say they have 
"no problem with nudity." 

3. Always have an Israeli above the line somewhere to keep 
everyone scared. 

4- Always tell your leads you will fire them it they start hav- 
ing sex with each other. 

5. Never have sex with your lead. 

6. Always start the film with something quiet so that the 
projectionist will turn it up, then bust out your really loud 
stuff. 

7. Always have a boring scene around reel 8 (just before the 
third act) so that people can go take a leak before the excit- 
ing finale. 

8. Always have a character who is playing a film director 
explaining to a character who is playing a film critic what to 
write about the film. 

9. Never allow anyone to screen your film unless 4,000 
screaming teeny-boppers are mobbing the theater. 

10. Always get some really sexy young person to travel 
everywhere with you telling everyone that you are a genius. 
People will believe it. 

Matthew Harrison is director of the films Spare Me, Rhythm Thief, and Kicked 
in the Head. 



Lynn Hershman-Leeson 

Manifesto for Nondogma 

1. Maintain a sense of humor. 

2. Seduce public opinion, question everything. 

3. Use historical methods and craft as references. 

4- Mutate, mutilate, or manipulate genres or formats if necessary, in 
the service of story enhancement or character development. This 

includes linear and nonlinear, film and digital 

technologies. 

5. Employ improvisational techniques that 
engender spontaneous eruptions as an 
enhanced means toward creating authentic 
narrative language. 

6. In a world environment of compromise, 
pollution, and chaos, art works can no longer 
be politically indifferent. Censorship, self cen- 
sorship, propriety, racism, gender bias, or any type of repression can- 
not be tolerated. 

7. Each frame will be a microcosmic reflection of the construction of 
the work. 

8. Use risk as a creative force towards revitalizing, restoring, and 
expanding aesthetic constrictions. 

9. In order to adapt to unforseen opportunities of chance and vision, 
all art must remain dogma free. 

Lynn Hershman-Leeson has worked for the past 30 years in many media, including photogra- 
phy, site-specific public art, and video. She is credited as being the first artist to create an inter- 
active art videodisk. Her first feature film, Conceiving Ada, will be released by Fox Lorber this 
spring. 



^^^^^H$£" H^ 




wF ^P\ — 


^^ m i 




■ L ^^ 




« " 1 




n * i 


v H 




^1 


■ v ^ 


>£^ 


i^Lv # 


* i| 






Scott King 



1. The director is the eighth most important person in the making of 
a film. The ranking is as follows: 

1 ) The writer 

2) The editor 

3) The casting director 

4) The composer 

5) The cinematographer 

6) The script supervisor 

7) The producer. 
The credits should reflect this. 

2. Have a reason for making the film. Driving people from their seats 
with a revolutionary view of hegemony is a reason. "I want to be a 
director" is not. If you don't know why you want to make the movie, 
become a cheese maker. People like cheese. 

3. You know what ? I've seen naked women before. Let's move on. 

4. When I see the word "handgun" in a script, I reach for the inciner- 
ator. 

5. Read Ebert's Little Movie Glossary: A Compendium of Movie Cliches 
and Stereotypes . . . (Andrews and McMeel, 1994) very carefully. Stop 
doing everything in it. 

6. There is no such thing as realism. 

7. Coverage is for stupidheads. 

8. Movies made by a committee decision-making process are better 
movies. Most of the time. I'm pretty sure about this. Let me check 
with my boss. 

9. Take all the establishing shots in a movie. Put them in a pile. Light 
them on fire. Step away. 



38 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 




Do you swear to make the 
film, the whole fim, and 
nothing but the film? Nick 
Offerman and Lance Baker in 
Scott King's Treasure Island. 
Courtesy filmmaker 

Inset: David Angus (left) and 
Ian Hart as Epstein and 
Lennon in The Hours and 
Times, by Christopher Munch. 
Courtesy filmmaker 



10. Everything is gratuitous. I will always he making the greatest 
movie ever made. Not to be doing so would be a waste of my time 
and yours, gentle reader. Hence, Treasure Island is currently the great- 
est movie ever made. That is all. 

Scott King, under the auspices of King Pictures, lias executive produced three independent films: 
Shotgun Freeway: Drives thru Lost L.A. (a documentary on the history of his Angeles with 
James Ellroy and Dawd Hockney), Star Maps (the feature debut of writer/director Miguel 
Arteta and a nominee for Best Picture for the Independent Spirit Awards), and Olympia (the 
feature debut of Robert Byington, which closed this year's Slamdance film festival and closed this 
year's South hy Southwest film festival) With Treasure Island, Mr. King's debut as a writer 
and cinematographer, Mr. King continues his support of films that might otherwise not be made. 
Mr. King's superpower is his ah/lity to guess how well a piece of clothing will fit a woman. He 
discovered this power during a stint as a retail clerk. He lias never guessed lining. 



Christopher Munch 



Thoughts about my current work. 

1 . It cannot be written other than by its own timetable. The material 
must be ripe before it can be plucked. 

2. The form that the material takes should emerge out of an overall 
preoccupation that has matured over time, not a desire for effect. 

3. The material should illuminate aspects of the world that no longer 
exist, even while being fully "contemporary." 

4- Money concerns should not enter into the film's planning. The 
material must dictate the scale and proportion of the undertaking. At 
the same time, money that comes with strings attached that will 
dilute the material should be resisted. 

5. Filmmaking should take place in corners of the world of which I 
would like to see more, and the cast be international. Cast must be 
available for thorough and intensive rehearsal that cannot be 



reduced. 

6. No lens shorter than 40mm should be employed unless 
there is no other way to make the shot. Further, lenses 
must be selected for their appropriateness and not for their 
apparent sharpness. 

7. Our negative must be made to function appropriately for 
the material and our taste; it must be impregnable not only 
by light but by what cannot be seen. It should print with 
very few light changes. 

8. Video dailies must be resisted. Editing by computer 
should be used only as a supplemental organizing tool. No 
less than nine months should be allocated to editing. 

9. Stereo sound should be used only if absolutely appropri- 
ate. 

10. No ugly posters or asinine trailers should be made. 

Christopher Munch has written ami directed Backwards Looks, Far Corners (in 
post) ; Color of a Brisk and Leaping Day ( 1 996) about the Yosemite Valley Rail- 
road which was awarded Best Cinematography at Sundance; and the short feature 
The Hours and Times (J99IJ, based on the friendship of Brian Epstein and 
John Lennon. Born in 1962 and self-taught m filmmaking, he was a Guggenheim 
Fellow m 1994 and received the Swatch Someone to Watch Award m 1996. 



Tommy Pallotta, Esther 
Robinson, Lance Weiler, 
Stefan Avalos 

Digital '99 

1. Distribution, not production, will determine the future of film- 
making. 

2. Distribution will become global. Broadband delivery (Internet, 
satellite...) will provide artists with direct access to their audience. 

3. We will end the indentured servitude to film and traditional the 

atrical distribution. 

4- Venues can be anywhere people gather 




January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 39 




worked exclusively in video and digital formats and produced the award 
winning short Roadhead. He is co-founder of the Conduit Digital Festival. 
• Esther Robinson served as the event co-producer for the Fuel Tour, is co- 
producing Doug Block's feature documentor} Home Page, and is co- 
founder of Wavelength Releasing which presented the first theatrical 
release of a digital feature film via satellite. • Lance Weiler and Stefan 
Avalos made the digital film The Last Broadcast and are cofounders of 
Wavelength Releasmg, which is in ^reproduction on three feature projects. 



Britta Sjogren 



- 



Toby Smith discovers her worst nightmare in 
Drylongso by Cauleen Smith. 

Courtesy filmmaker 



Guided by voices: Britta Sjogren's Jo-Jo at the 
Gate of Lions. Courtesy filmmaker 



because 
digital projection will 
become smaller, brighter, 
cheaper and better. 

5. All formats are accepted; we will not privilege any media over 
another. 

6. We will privilege ingenuity, invention, and vision. 

7. The more people who make films, the better. Abundance through 
technology. 

9. We will continually exploit the advances in new and affordable 
technology as tools for self-expression. 

10. All above rules must be broken. 

Recent technology has opened a window of opportunity for filmmak- 
ers unlike any that has come before. The ability to create without 
compromise, together with the tools to exhibit one's work, have 
given birth to a digital wave of filmmaking. 

Eschewing traditional film methods since his feature The High Road, Tommy PalliMa has 



Credo 

Remember there is no right way to shoot a scene. 

When in doubt, simplify. 

Welcome to the unforeseen. 

Kill your darlings. 

Take pleasure. 

Be true. 

Pray. 

Britta Sjogren's first feature Jo-Jo at the Gate of Lions was honored at 
numerous festivals. Her short film A Small Domain won the Grand ]ury 
Prize at Sundance. She is currently shooting a feature called Green and 
Dimming, costing a second film, and has a third in development. She is a 
professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, teaching femi- 
nist film theory. 



Cauleen Smith 



■ 



Dogma: The process & practice 

1 . I submit to the plasticity of film and the 
ephemeral nature of video. I will tweak, high- 
light, diffuse, and distort to the extreme para- 
^ meters of my chosen film stock. 

2. I will test and shoot only with film stocks 
that demonstrate a sensitivity to dark skin 
tones. 

3. I will not use any effect that I cannot 
H make myself on an Oxberry camera stand. 

4- The form of the film must be directly 
related to the content. I will not impose a 
single aesthetic arbitrarily on varied subject matter. 

5. I vow to shoot only in locations over which I have total control, 
including painting, removing, and adding walls and windows. 

6. I will no longer engage in revisionist filmmaking, i.e., that which is 
a reaction to current trends that may offend or oppress me. Instead, I 
vow to tell a personal and critical truth. 

7. It's my world. 

8. I respect and honor the craft of filmmaking. A craftsperson may be 
commissioned to build an outhouse or a cathedral in his backyard. 
He may build a masterpiece. 

9. I vow to be fearless. 

10. I vow to be brazen in my agenda to deify black women with every 
image. Her complete humanity must be pushed to the surface while 
the story devices and character constructions recede. 

11. Make it pretty. 

12. Every day, hour, minute, spent laboring on a film is pure bliss. I 
vow to drink it up. 



Cauleen Smith currentN lives in L.A., hut prefers the light m the Bay Area. She's writing a 
screenplay while watching what happes with her first feature, Drylongso. She's also in postpro- 
ductirm on an experimental short science fiction love story entitled The Changing Same. 



40 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



mW, 





www.aivf.org 



Artisan 
Entertainment 

BY LlSSA GIBBS 



Artisan Entertainment: West Coast office: 2700 
Colorado Blvd. 2nd fl., Santa Monica, CA 90404; 
(310) 449-9200; fax: 255-3890; www.artisanent. 
com; East Coast office: 157 Chambers St, 12th fl., 
NY, NY 10007; (212) 577-2400; fax: 577-2890. 

What is Artisan? 

Artisan is a new leader in indepen- 
dent film and is a fully integrated 
diversified entertainment company 
which develops, produces, markets 
and distributes motion pictures 
directly in the domestic market (in 
theatrical, home entertainment and 
all television markets) and through 
distributors internationally. 

Who is Artisan? 

Artisan is a privately held company 

managed by Mark Curcio (Chief 

Executive Officer, formerly head of 

Bain and Company's entertainment 

consulting practice), Amir Malm 

(President, formerly a founding 

partner of October Films), and Bill 

Block (President, formerly head of 

West Coast operations for ICM). The company's titles 

range from its vast library of 6,000 titles (including 

everything from It's a Wonderful Life to Terminator 2: 

Judgment Day) to its dynamic new production slate 

including Darren Aronofsky's Pi (which won Best 

Director at last year's Sundance Film Festival) to 

Roman Polanski's upcoming thriller The Ninth Gate, 

starring Johnny Depp. 

Total number of employees? 

180 and growing rapidly. 

How, when, and why did Artisan come into being? 




Artisan was formed in July of 1997 when a group of pri- 
vate investors took over LIVE Entertainment and 
installed Messrs. Curcio, Malin and Block as its new 
management team. The principal belief behind the ven- 
ture was that there is a place in the market for a strong 
independent and that since the acquisitions of Miramax 
and New Line and their subsequent changes in strate- 
gy, there has not been a strong independent "mini- 
major". 

How many works are in your collection? 

Artisan controls a library of approximately 6,000 titles 
and currently releases between 10 and 15 new films 



Films and filmmakers you distribute: 

Our 1999 release slate includes The Ninth Gate, Steven 
Soderbergh's The Limey, Atom Egoyan's Felicia's 
Journey, David Koepp's Stir of Echoes, and Ken Loach's 
Name Is Joe. In addition to our own productions 
and acquisitions, we have a distribution agreement 
with The Shooting Gallery. 

What types of works do you distribute? 

Artisan is a fully functional studio capable of releasing 
a wide range of product with unique care and attention, 
from specialized art house films like Pi and The Cruise 
to wide release product like The Ninth Gate and Jerry 
Springer: Ringmaster. We are the only independent 
capable of releasing this range of product. 

What drives you to acquire the films you do? 

A commitment to independent cinema. An ability to 
define our direction. 

Is Artisan also involved in co-production or co- 
financing of works? 

We produce films internally and are also involved in co- 
production/co-financing. For example, we are currently 
working on Darren Aronofsky's Requiem for a Dream, 
the follow-up to Pi, under such a structure. 

Is there such a thing as an "Artisan" film? 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 41 



DISTRIBUTOR F.A.Q, 



AVID 



New MC 7.1 PCI 



FEATURES 

SHORTS 

DOCUMENTARIES 

BROADCAST COMMERCIALS 

DEMO REELS 

MUSIC VIDEOS 

CORPORATE VIDEOS 



Editorial Services 

with experienced 

cutting-edge editors 



OFFLINE/ONLINE 

AVR up to 77 

Beta SP/VHS/TC DAT 

After Effects & 3D Effects 



HOURLY/DAILY/WEEKLY RATES 



Other Services Include: 

• Post Production Supervision 

• Script Evaluation 

• Budgeting 

• Avid Training Courses 



MERCI MEDIA, INC. 

143 WEST 29TH STREET, 

SUITE 902 

NEW YORK, NY 10001 

VOICE: 212/675 1497 

FAX: 212/675 0749 

mercient@mercient.com 

www.mercient.com 





An Artisan film is one that is true to the vision of the 
filmmaker and that entertains and challenges the view- 
er. 

Best-known title in Artisan's collection: 

Terminator 2: Judgment Day. 

What's your basic approach to releasing a title? 

Each title is given individual care and a detailed mar- 
keting and release plan is developed with the filmmak- 
er to ensure that all efforts — publicity, marketing, and 
distribution — are uniquely tailored to the genre, philos- 
ophy and vision of the film. By focusing on 10 to 15 
films per year, we can give each project an optimal 
amount of attention. 

Where do Artisan titles generally show? 

Depending on the title, we might open it in only a few 
cities and expand it or we might open on 2,000 screens 
or more. As mentioned, our broad distribution capabili- 
ties are tailored to each individual title based on the 
characteristics of that film and the distribution and 
marketing methodology to which it is best suited. 

Where do you find your titles and how should film- 
makers approach you for consideration? 

Artisan is active at film festivals and markets world- 
wide and is extremely aggressive in acquisitions. Let us 
know about your film and we will come see you! 

Range of production budgets of titles in your collec- 
tion: 

Our current production slate ranges from $2.5 to $30 
million. Most of our acquisitions are at the lower end of 
that range. 

Biggest change at Artisan in recent years: 

This is an entirely new company. The only common 




thread from the many years of LIVE 
Entertainment's existence is the library 
which LIVE enjoyed and which is being 
rapidly expanded and more efficiently 
marketed by the Artisan team. 

If you weren't distributing films, what 
would you be doing? 

Writing and directing them. Either that, or 
serving as Lt. Governor under the 
Honorable Jesse "The Body" Ventura. 

You knew Artisan had made it as a company when... 

In the span of one week we were the feature story in 
major, multi-page articles in the LA Times and the trade 
papers which were both complimentary and extremely 
critical. 

Best distribution experience you've had lately: 

I believe the job Artisan did in acquiring, marketing, and 
distributing Darren Aronofsky's Pi was outstanding. 
This became one of the best-performing specialized 
releases of the year and given the challenges of releas- 
ing it — its format (black and white) and quirky content 
(in the words of the director, "God, Math, and bad-ass 
Jews") — it was very rewarding to see it become a com- 
mercial success. Again, this is indicative of the tremen- 
dous attention we give to each Artisan release and we 
look forward to duplicating this success with each film 
under our care. 

Where will Artisan be 10 years from now? 

If we are able to fulfill our promise and continue down 
the path we are currently forging, Artisan will be the 
premier independent motion picture company in the 
world, and we will be the place where independent 
filmmakers go to realize their vision. 



42 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



Other distributors you admire: 

Miramax and New Line wrote the book on how to suc- 
ceed as independents. While their strategies have 
changed (thus creating the market need for a company 
like Artisan) their early steps were highly admirable. 

The difference between Artisan and other distribu- 
tors of independent films is . . . 

the attention we give to each film, our ability to market 
and distribute a film on two or 2,500 screens, and our 
outstanding and fully integrated ancillary distribution 
capabilities. 

If you could give independent filmmakers one bit of 
advice it would be to . . . 

be true to your creative vision and make the movie you 
want to make — the integrity and honesty of a film to 

itself and its 
creator is one 
of its most 
visible 
assets. 

Upcoming 
titles to 
watch for: 

The Limey 
(starring 
Terence 
Stamp, Peter 
Fonda, Leslie 
Ann Warren), 

Stir of Echoes (Kevin Bacon), The Ninth Gate (Johnny 
Depp, Lena Olin, Frank Langella), Felicia's Journey. 

The future of independent film distribution in this 
country is one . . . 

which has great promise as big studio pictures contin- 
ue to converge on similar budgets and special effects- 
driven stories that make for "event movies." 

Famous last words: 

Artisan means business. By working with today's and 
tomorrow's most talented filmmakers and by helping 
them be true to their creative vision, we will become the 
acknowledged leader in independent film. 

Distributor F.A.Q. is a column conducted by fax questionnaire 
profiling a wide range of distributors of independent film and 
video. If you are a distributor and want to be profiled or are a 
maker and want to find out more about a particular distributor, 
contact Lissa Gibbs c/o The Independent, 304 Hudson St., 6th 
fl., NY, NY 10013, or drop an e-mail to: lissag@earthlink.net 

Llssa Gibbs is a contributing editor to The Independent 
and former Film Arts Foundation Fest director. 




/ 



AVID rental 

large rooms 

with a view 

in mid-town 

24 hr building 



AVID 1000/AVR77 
AVID 800 Film Composer 



X 



/ 



X 



As long-time 

AIUF members 

our goal is to help 

other independent 

^producers and editors y 

Our rates are 
competitive 



DIVA Edit 
1-800-324-AVID 

V 330 W 42nd St NYC Z' 







SCREENPLAY 



June 15th, 1999 

ROSARITO BEACH, 
BAJA CALIFORNIA 

The filming location of the movie epic, "TITANIC" 




TST PRIZE $2,000 plus 
2ND PRIZE $1, 000 phis 
3RD PRIZE $500 plus 



FOR INFORMATION & APPLICATION 
Send S.A.S.E. to our U.S. Border address 

BISC 

P.O.Box 439030 

SanYsidro, CA 92143 

(619) 615-9977 



29 



TH STREET VIDEO 



A full service video editing and production company. 
Formed by independent producers who saw the need 
for a hi-quality, fair priced facility. Fifteen years of 
experience in Broadcast, Documentary and Corporate 
video. We know how to do it. 

PRODUCTION: 29th Street Video is a full 



service video production house. One camera or multi- 
camera, we do it the best, and we do it for less. 

POST PRODUCTION: full service 



BET AC AM SP ON-LINE EDITING S95/HR. Included: Sony 
DSF500 3D digital effects, Tascam 10 ch. mix, a very 
comfortable room. More flash, less cash. 

DUPLICATION: Talk is cheap. Send 
something to dub and you won't regret it. We use high 
grade tape and the best SONY machines. 

212.594.7530 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 43 



CP-rHilJHP- 



JEROME FOUNDATION 



by Michelle Coe 




projects, and interactive media. Production grants are 
awarded to emerging artists showing promise ot excel- 
lence who may not have had the support needed to fully 
display their work. ("Emerging" refers to career level 
and recognition, not to ongoing stylistic evolution.) 

Do you support projects at specific stages of pro- 
duction (e.g., script stage, development, produc- 
tion, distribution, etc.)? 

We prefer to support projects in the beginning stages of 
actual production (which does not include scripting or 
development). However, we have been known to sup- 
port projects in later stages of production, or even the 
beginning of postproduction. We do not fund distribu- 
tion, marketing, tape-to-film transfers, etc. 

What are some of the best known project titles 
and/or artists the Jerome Foundation has funded? 

She's Gotta Have It, by Spike Lee; Poison, by Todd 
Haynes; Paris Is Burning, by Jennie Livingston; 



Jerome Foundation, 125 Park Square Court, 400 
Sibley Street, St. Paul, MN, 55101; from NY (800) 
995-3766; from MN (612) 224-9431; fax (651) 224- 
3439; www.jeromefdn.org; Contact: Robert Byrd, 
Program Officer. 

What is the Jerome Foundation? 

The Jerome Foundation is a nonprofit, philanthropic, 
grantmaking organization that provides funding to arts 
organizations and individual artists. 

What's the driving philosophy behind the Jerome 
Foundation? 

Through its various funding activities, the Jerome 
Foundation is dedicated to promoting artistic excel- 
lence, and affirming that excellence is determined by 
broad and diverse aesthetic criteria. The focus of our 
programs is designed to make effective and strategic 
use of the organization's resources. 

How, when, and why did the Jerome Foundation 
come into being? 

The foundation was created by artist and philanthropist 
J. Jerome Hill (1905-1972) in 1964. It was originally 
known as the Avon Foundation and became the Jerome 
Foundation in 1973. 

Your funding programs exist for media artists living 
in the five boroughs of New York City or in the state 
of Minnesota. What's the connection? 

Jerome Hill was born and grew up in St. Paul, 
Minnesota. Later in life he moved to New York City, 
where he thrived as a painter, filmmaker, composer, and 
photographer. He wanted to give financial assistance to 
enable numerous artists to continue their work. 



Applicants must reside in 
Minnesota to be considered for the 
Minnesota program, or one of the 
five boroughs of New York City to be 
considered for the New York pro- 
gram. 

What percentage of your overall 
funding goes towards film or 
video? 

Approximately 17%. 

How many media awards are 
given out per year? 

There is no set number. The New York City and 
Minnesota media arts panels determine the number of 
awards during their panel sessions. However, in New 
York, where panelists meet three times per year, the 
foundation has been known to give as many as 21 
grants per year and as few as perhaps 10-12. In 
Minnesota, where panelists meet only once per year, as 
many as 9-10 grants may be awarded. 

What is the average size of a Jerome grant? And 
what is the total amount awarded annually? 

We don't like to think in terms of the average size of a 
grant, but grants generally range from $8,000 to 
$15,000. The approximate total in New York for 1998- 
1999 is $257,000, and in Minnesota $95,000 for 1998. 

What is the ratio of applicants to recipients? 

Approximately 15% of applicants are funded. 

What types of projects does Jerome fund? 

Primarily film and video artists, however, we welcome 
other forms, such as film/video installation, on-line 




Moment of Impact, by Julia Loktev; Swoon, by Tom 
Kalin. 

What are some of your personal favorites? 

All of the above. 

Explain your funding cycle and deadlines. 

In Minnesota, our panel meets once per year (spring), 
with a deadline of late winter. In New York, the panel 
meets three times per year (winter, spring, and sum- 
mer) with no application deadlines. 

Who are the Program Officers of Jerome? 

The program staff is Cindy Gehrig (President), Vickie 
Benson, and myself. 

Who makes the awards decisions? 

Our panels make recommendations for grants which 
then require the approval of our Board of Directors. 

What advice do you have for putting forth a strong 
application? 

First and foremost, follow directions. Do not send too 



44 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



little or too much; send exactly what is requested in our 
guidelines. Second, build a case for convincing the 
panel that your film must be made. What is the film or 
project about? What's unusual about it 7 What's your 
personal attraction to the subject matter? What will be 
your take on it, both substantively and stylistically? 

Submit a clear, concise, and realistic budget. 
Budgets too large, and especially too small, will be 
frowned upon by the panel. On that note, we like to see 
that filmmakers plan on paying themselves for their 
labor. Also, make sure work samples are the best they 
can be. Always show your best sample material right 

away; do 

not expect 

that the 

panel will 

eventually 

get to it. 

Make sure 

your tapes 

a r e 

cued to 

the best 




Julia Loktev's Moment 
of Impact. 

Courtesy filmmaker 



material. 

Installation, on-line, and interactive artists should 
speak in a very clear language that a lay person can 
understand. Don't assume a panelist will understand 
highly technical language. 

Resumes should be clear and give enough back- 
ground information to convince a panel that the appli- 
cant can indeed do the work he/she is proposing. If you 
are proposing a project outside a genre in which you 
have traditionally worked, it is important that you con- 
vince the panel that you can make the leap. This is 
extremely important. I've seen many requests get 
declined because applicants failed to address this 
question. 

What's the most common mistake applicants make? 

Not reading directions. All too often applicants fail to 
read our guidelines. 

What would people most be surprised to learn 
about the Jerome Foundation and/or its founders? 

That we looooove controversy! 

Famous last words for filmmakers: 

Never give up on your dream, even if you are constant- 
ly denied funding from grantmaking institutions. 

Funder F.A.Q. is a new column profiling foundations, funding 
organizations, and financiers of independent film and video 
projects. If you are a funder and would like your organization or 
company to be profiled, contact Michelle Coe at AIVF, 304 
Hudson St., 6th fl„ NY, NY 10013, or send an email to 
michelle@aivf.org. 

Michelle Coe is program and Information sen/Ices 
director at AIVF. 



Intrigue Entertainment 




Proudly Presents 

The. 1999 Silver ScreenVlzy Awards 

Call For Entries 

This competition was formed by an independent 
production company, in order to discover your 
voice. You an never be Wend, if you never try. 

Any den re/Form Accepted (Including Manu- 
scripts) 

Top 2 Winners Recieve Cash Awards of $3,000/ 
Possible Option 
Showcase Readings by Professional Actors, for 
Managers and Producers 

Early Bird Entry Fee (Feb. IS, 1999): $45 
Final Deadline Entry Fee (March 1, 1999): $65 
Contact Intrigue Entertainment for Further Information: 

Phone: (310)28! 5589 
E-Mail: DocMar!ey<s>msn.com 



THE SCH001 OF THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO 

ANIMATION/3D VISUALIZATION 

The School of the Art Institute of 
Chicago seeks practicing artist to 
teach and help expand animation 
courses in art & technology and film- 
making. Animator-filmmakers, 3D ani- 
mators, and real-time 3D visualization 
artists are encouraged to apply. Ability 
to work with beginning and advanced 
students. School's open curriculum 
nurtures experimentation and interdis- 
ciplinary work in art & technology, film, 
video, sound, painting, sculpture, etc. 
Full-time, tenure-track, rank open. 

Send letter of application; resume; 
statement of teaching philosophy; 
sample of work; names/addresses of 
three references and SASE by 
February 1, 1999 to: 

Animation Search Committee/IND 
SAIC, Dean's Office 
37 South Wabash Avenue 
Chicago, IL 60603 

AA/EOE/WMA 




437 Madison Avenue New York, N.Y. 10022 TEL: 212.415.2617 FAX: 212.415.3500 www.cdpweb.com 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 45 



by Scott Castle 

listings do not constitute an endorsement. we 
recommend that you contact the festival 
directly before sending cassettes as details 
may change after the magazine goes to press, 
deadline: 15th of the month two-and-a-half 
months prior to cover date (jan. 15 for april 
issue). include festival dates, categories, 
prizes, entry fees, deadlines, formats & con- 
tact info. send to: festivals@aivf.org 

Domestic 

ATHENS INTERNATIONAL FILM & VIDEO FESTIVAL, April 30- 
May 7. OH. Deadline: Feb. 15. 26th annual festival acknowledg- 
ing current technical possibilities in film/video production. The 
Athens Festival defines "film" as a work whose primary intended 
viewing context is as a projected celluloid image & "video" as a 
work whose primary intended viewing context is as a video image 
on a monitor/TV, or as presented via video projection. Each entry 
is pre-screened by a pre-screenmg committee comprised of film- 
makers, videomakers & other artists associated w/ the Athens 
Center for Film & Video. All works that evidence a high regard for 
artistic innovation, sensitivity to content & personal involvement 
w/ the medium will be welcomed. Cash prizes will be awarded to 
competition winners in each category. Cats: narrative, doc, 
experimental & animation. Entry fee: $25 plus pre-paid return 
shipping/insurance. Formats: 16mm, 3/4", 1/2"; For preview pur- 
poses, 1/2" NTSC, 3/4" U-matic & 16mm prints are acceptable. 
Contact: Athens Center for Film & Video, Box 388, Rm. 407, 75 W. 
Union St., Athens, OH 45701: (614) 593-1330: fax: 597-2560; 
bradley@oak.cats.ohiou.edu, www.cats.ohiou.edu/~filmfest/ 

CONDUIT DIGITAL FEST, mid-Mar, TX. Deadline: Feb. 15. Conduit 
celebrates the convergence of various media & computing tech- 
nologies by offering a showcase of cutting edge digital technolo- 
gy from around the world. Entering its third year of innovative 
programming, Conduit features digital shorts, animations & fea- 
ture films of any genre & will spotlight computer games in '99! 
Any full motion video sequences from computer-gaming will be 
considered. Conduit will showcase these highly original works in 
a cinema setting utilizing a digital projector. This celebration 
includes panels, Q&A sessions, screenings & parties featuring 
electronic music video selections & live performances. Entries 
must be submitted on 1/2" VHS-NTSC. Entry fee: none. Contact: 
Conduit Digital Fest, 906 E. 5th St. Suite 103, Austin TX, 78765; 
(512) 485-3147; www.conduitfest.com 

HUDSON VALLEY FILM FESTIVAL, May 27-31, NY. Deadline: 
March 1. This collaborative, noncompetitive fest celebrates the 
screenwriter w/ screenings of features, shorts & docs, as well as 
screenplay readings, a panel discussion & a closing night tribute 
to a screenwriter's work. Fest also includes two unique events w/ 
deadline of Mar. 1: The Drive-In Film Fest, currently seeking 
35mm genre films to be screened at a drive-in theater & Scored 
Shorts, which seeks films under 20 min. to be scored by mem- 
bers of Hudson Valley Philharmonic. All entries must be submit- 
ted on VHS or Screenplay. Formats: Features & docs-35mm & 
16mm. Shorts-16mm or Beta. Preview on VHS. Entry fees: fea- 
tures/drive-in/doc.: $25. Shorts: $20. Screenplays: $15. Contact: 
Nancy Cozean, Hudson Valley Film & Video Office, 40 Garden St., 
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601; (914) 473-0318; fax: 473-0082; 
hvfo@vh.net; www.sandbook.com/hvfo 

JOHNS HOPKINS FILM FESTIVAL, April 15-18, MD. Deadlines: 
Feb. 1 (early); March. 1 (final). 2nd annual festival presented by 
Johns Hopkins Film Society, is a 4-day, 3-venue extravaganza, 



taking place on the Hopkins Homewood Campus during the leg- 
endary Spring Fair. Last year's fest drew over 2,200 attendants, 
showed over 100 films, received a Mayor's Proclamation, was 
voted Baltimore Magazine's Best Film Event & received unprece- 
dented East Coast coverage. This year's fest will feature panels, 
speakers, independent distributors & lots of parties. We "show- 
case new talent & remember that film is all about having fun." 
Cats: narrative, doc, animation, experimental, short. Formats: 
16mm, 35mm, all video & DV Entry fees: $25 (early); $35 (final). 
Contact: JHFF 3501 St. Paul St. Apt. 619, Baltimore, MD 21218; 
(410) 889-8324; fax: 516-5048, seether@jhu.edu; 
www.seether.com/filmfest 

KANSAS CITY FILMMAKERS JUBILEE, April 14-18, MO/KS. 
Deadline: Jan. 31. This is the Jubilee's third year & over $10,000 
in cash & prizes will be awarded. There are two divisions this 
year: 1) Kansas City Metro Division (13 county, bi-state KC metro 
area residents only): Features & shorts completed since Jan. 31, 
1996; Entry fee: $15. Cats: narrative, experimental, animation, 
doc, music video. 2) Natl Short Film Division: films under 15 
min. in length completed since July 31, 1997. Entry fee: $20. All 
formats eligible. Preview on VHS. Cats: narrative, experimental, 
animation. Contact: KCFJ: 4826 W. 77th Terrance, Prairie Village, 
KS 66208; (913) 383-8551; KCJubilee@aol.com; www.ifckc.com 

MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, April 
16-May 1, MN. Deadline: March 1. 17th annual festival was 
started by University Film Society Artistic Director Al Milgrom. It 
is the largest film event in the upper midwest, bringing in more 
foreign films to Minnesota than any other film organization or 
event. The program is predominantly foreign, w/ focuses on 
Scandinavian & Baltic films. The emerging filmmakers section is 
showcase for self-distributed, independent filmmakers; entries 
are selected from submitted VHS tapes by a panel. Awards: 
Emerging Filmmaker awards, Audience "Best of the Fest" 
Awards. Formats: 35mm, 16mm. Preview on VHS. No entry fee. 
Contact: University Film Society, 2331 University Ave SE, Ste. 
130B, Minneapolis. MN 55414; (612) 627-4431; fax: 627-4111; 
filmsoc@tc.umn.edu; www.tc.umn.edu/nlhome/g023/ filmsoc 



NANTUCKET FILM FESTIVAL, June 14-19, MA. Deadlines: April 9 
(film); March 12 (screenplay competition). Festival focuses on 
screenwriters & their craft, presents feature films, short films, 
docs, staged readings, Q&A w/ filmmakers, panel discussions & 
the Morning Coffee With... series. Writers are encouraged to pre- 
sent their films & works-m-progress & get feedback from other 
screenwriters & filmmakers. Film Submissions: entry must not 
have had commercial distribution or US broadcast. Formats: 
35mm, 16mm ; preview on 1/2". Entry fee: $40 features; $25 
shorts (35 minutes or less). Screenplay Competition: The Tony 
Cox Award for Screenwntmg Competition, sponsored by Showtime 
Networks, entry must be screenwriter's original, unproduced 
work. Entry fee: $40. Contact: Jill Goode, Artistic Director, 
Nantucket Film Festival, PO Box 688, Prince St. Station, New York, 
NY 10012; (212) 642-6339; www.nantucketfilmfestival.org 

NEW YORK ANIMATION FESTIVAL, April 21-24. Deadline: Jan 4 
(early), Feb. 1 (final). First annual comprehensive festival for all 
types of animation, incl. film, video & digital animation of any 
genre. Student & int'l entries encouraged. Preview on VHS. Entry 
fees: $25-$35. Contact: NYAF, Box 1513, Peter Stuyvesant 
Station, New York, NY 10009; (212) 982-7781; fax: 260-0912; 
NYAFest@yahoo.com; www.members.tripod.com/~nyafest 
/home, html 

NEWARK BLACK FILM FESTIVAL, July, NJ. Deadline: early March. 
6-wk summer fest of films by African-American filmmakers & 
films featuring history & culture of Black people in America & 
elsewhere. Fest, now over 2 decades old, has screened over 500 
films before total audiences of almost 85,000. Paul Robeson 
Awards are biennial, next competition is 2000. Fest accepts non- 
commercial, ind. films & videos completed in previous 2 yrs in 
cats of doc, non-doc, animation & experimental. Original 16mm 
films & videos released w/in previous 2 yrs considered; industri- 
al, commercial or studio prods ineligible. Committee representing 
sponsors & community arranges fest & selects films. Cash prizes 
awarded at discretion of judges. Fest is free to public & co-spon- 
sored by Newark Museum, Newark Public Library, Newark 
Symphony Hall, New Jersey Inst, of Technology & Rutgers Univer- 




SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL LESBIAN & GAY FILM FESTIVAL 



Frameline presents the 23rd year of the SFIL&GFF, the 
Grand Old Dame of the international gay fest circuit, 
in June of '99. Fest attracts large &enthusiastic audi- 
ences (1998's fig- 
ure was 75,000) and 
is a prime showcase 
for queer films and 
their makers. 1998's 
110 screenings took 
place at the city's 
Castro & Victoria 
Theatres and at the 
Roxie Cinema where 
audience award- 
winners included 
Tim Kirkman's Dear 

Jesse (best doc), Laurie Schmidt's Sleep Come Free 
Me (best short), and Todd Downing's Dirty Baby Does 
Fire Island (animation). Bold & eclectic programming 



last year included Lisa Cholodenko's 
High Art, Barbara Hammer's The 
Female Closet, P.I. Castellaneta's 




Relax ... It's Just Sex, and a side- 
bar presentation on intersexuals enti- 
tled 'Hermaphrodites with Attitude'. 



46 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



sity/Newark. Entry fee: $25 (Robeson com- 
petiton). Contact: Jane B. Stein, Newark 
Black Film Festival, Newark Museum, 49 
Washington St., Box 540, Newark, NJ 
07101; (973) 596-6550; fax: 642-0459 



1 or 2 PLAYERS 



Conduit 



NOT STILL ART FESTIVAL, April 23-24, NY. 
Deadline: March 15. 4th annual test 
invites entries for its int'l screening of 
abstract & non-narrative video art & 
music/sound design. The 1999 NSA 
Screening will be featured at Cyberarts '99 
Boston May 8, as well as on cable televi- 
sion this year. The NSA Festival was creat- 
ed as a forum for artists working abstract 
& non-narrative forms & features a panel 
discussion & a live video/music perfor- 
mance, in addition to the screening. 
Subsequent screenings around the country 
are scheduled after initial festival. It is 
requested that programs be around 5 min. 
in length. Formats: S-VHS, Hi8 or 3/4". For 
more info contact: The Not Still Art 
Festival, Box 496, Cherry Valley, NY 13320; 
fax: (607) 264-3476; nsa_fest@hotmail.com; www.impro 
vart.com/nsa.htm 

OUTFEST '99, July 8-18, CA. Deadline: March 1. Held at the 
Directors Guild of America & nearby venues, Outfest seeks films 
& videos by &/or about gay men, lesbians, bisexuals & trans- 
genders. Open to narrative & doc features & shorts on 35mm, 
16mm, 3/4" or 1/2" video. Twelve awards ranging from $500 to 
$2,000. Preview on VHS. Entry fee: $10-$20. For more info con- 
tact: Outfest, 1125 N. McCadden PL, #235, Los Angeles, CA 
90038; (323) 960-9200; fax: 960-2397; outfest@outfest.org 

PALM BEACH INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, April 9-18, FL. 
Deadline: Feb.15. Now in its fourth year, festival is considered 
the southeast's most prestigious event. The '99 festival will host 
a series of events incl. Awards Gala (last year honorees, Burt 
Reynolds & Sylvester Stallone), World & U.S. premieres & par- 
ties, panel discussions & symposia, a student film showcase & 
10 full days of int'l films previewing in theaters throughout Palm 
Beach County. All test net proceeds provide grants to enhance 
existing high school & college film programs, as well as scholar- 
ships for deserving film students — over $90,000 awarded last 
April. Open to any genre, incl. doc, animation, experimental, 
drama & comedy, etc. Entry fees: Features $45; shorts $30 
(under 60 minutes in length). Contact: J.R Allen, Executive 
Director or Mark Diamond, Artistic Director, PBIFF, 1555 Palm 
Beach Lakes Boulevard, Ste. 403, West Palm Beach, FL, 33401; 
(561) 233-1044; fax: 683-6655; pbfilmfest@ aol.com; www. 
pbifilmfest.org 

SAN ANTONIO CINEFESTIVAL, June 16-20, TX. Deadline: March 
1. Now in its 22nd edition, this is the country's longest running 
Int'l Chicano/Latmo film & video festival. Seeks works by, for & 
about the Chicano & Latino experience & fosters discussion of 
topics affecting media arts. Festival exhibits programmed 
entries at the historic Guadalupe Theater & other venues. 
Includes public forums/discussions & media arts workshops. 
CineFestival's Premio Mesquite & honorable mention awards will 
be given in the following categories: narrative, doc, experimen- 
tal, First Work/Emerging Artist & will include a special Jury Award 
to entry that best exhibits the spirit of CmeFestival. Formats: 
35mm, 16mm, 3/4" & 1/2" video. Preview on NTSC video only. 
Entry fees: $25; $10 students (high school). Note: As of Jan. 1st 
Call For Entries can be downloaded at the Guadalupe Cultural 
Arts Center's webpage. Contact: Ray Santisteban, Director of 
Media Arts, Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, 1300 Guadalupe St. 
San Antonio, TX 78207; (210) 271-3151; fax: 271-3480; 



Computer games and intro/outro 

interstitials are spotlighted at the 

third Conduit Digital Fest, held in 

Austin. TX, mid-March (deadline: 

) & coin- 

with the 

South by South- 

. west fest. The 

'-st showcases 

g-edge 

I technol- 



e convergence 
of media & computing technolo- 
gies. Digital shorts, animations & 
features of any genre accepted. 



guadarts@aol.com; www.guadalu- 
peculturalarts.org/media.html 

Hi pita I pOCt SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL 
LHgliai rOOl LESBIAN & GAY FILM FESTIVAL, June, 

CA. Deadline: Late Feb. Founded in 
1976, this is one of world's largest & 
oldest events of its kind. Many works 
premiered in fest go on to be pro- 
grammed or distributed nat'ly & mt'ly. 
3 diverse pre-screening committees 
review submissions from Feb-Apr. 
accepting works at 1:3 ratio. Rough- 
cuts accepted for preview if submitted 
on 3/4" or 1/2". Fest especially encour- 
ages appl. from women & people of 
color. Entries must be San Francisco 
Bay Area premieres. Awards: Frameline 
Award, Audience Award. Fest produced 
by Frameline, nonprofit arts organiza- 
tion dedicated to lesbian & gay media 
arts. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 
1/2". Entry fee: $20. Contact: Jennifer 
Morris, Festival Director, Frameline, 
346 Ninth St., San Francisco, CA 94103; (415) 703-8650; fax: 
861-1404; info@framelme.org; www.framelme.org 

SAN FRANCISCO JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL, July 15-Aug. 1, CA. 
Deadline: March 15. Estab. in 1980, noncompetitive fest (under 
annual theme Independent Filmmakers: Looking at Ourselves) 
showcases new Independent American Jewish-subject cinema & 
diverse selection of foreign films. Fest presents dramatic, doc, 
experimental & animated shorts & features about Jewish history, 
culture & identity. Filmmakers need not be Jewish; films select- 
ed by subject. Special programs vary yearly & have include 
Russian, Sephardic & Latino programs. 35-40 films showcased 
each yr. Formats: 35mm, 16mm & Beta. Contact: Jams Plotkm, 
director or Sam Ball, associate director, Jewish Film Festival, 346 
9th St., San Francisco, CA 94103; (415) 621-0556; fax: (510) 
548-0536; Jewishfilm@aol.com; www.sfjff.org 

SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, May 13-June 6, WA. 
Deadline: March 1. Founded in 1974, fest one of largest non- 
competitive festivals in US, presenting more than 170 features & 
75 short films to audience of over 130,000. Known for its eclec- 
tic programming encompassing all genres & styles, from latest in 
contemporary world cinema to premieres of American ind. & 
major studio releases. Special programs include New Directors 
Film Showcase/Award, Independent Filmmakers Forum, 
American Independent Filmmakers Award, Golden Space Needle 
Awards given in cats of feature film, director, actress, actor, doc 
& short story. Inclusion qualifies participants for entry in 
Independent Feature Project's Independent Spirit Awards. 
Formats: 35mm, 16mm ; preview on 1/2". Contact: Michele 
Goodson/Film Entry Coordinator, Seattle Int'l Film Festival, 801 
E. Pine St., Seattle, WA 98122; (206)324-9996; fax: 324-9998; 
entry@seattlefilm.com; www.seattlefilm.com 

US INTERNATIONAL FILM & VIDEO FESTIVAL, June 3-4, IL. 
Deadline: March 1. Founded in 1968, this is the world's leading 
competition devoted exclusively to business, television, industri- 
al & informational productions. Entries are grouped within 68 
categories or 10 production techniques where they are judged in 
a two-tiered system. The mt'ly known Gold Camera Award & 
Silver Screen Award plaques recognize the top productions along 
w/ certificates & special industry-sponsored awards. 
Productions must have been created during the 18 months pre- 
ceding the deadline. Entry fees: $125-$200. Late entry avail. For 
complete info contact: USIFVF, 841 North Addison Ave., Elmhurst, 
IL 60126; (630) 834-7773; fax: 834-5565; filmfestinfo@film- 
festawards.com; www.filmfestawards.com 





"It's one of the best organized, 

best functioning film festivals I've 

ever been at. But at the same 

time, on a much more important 

level, there's a warmth, there's 

friendliness, there's a love of 

film that I truly appreciate." 

- Roger Corman. legend 



^ 



\| 




"Thanks for the best 
time I've ever had 
at a film festival!" 

- Chris Gore, Film Threat 








"The audience they've 
developed reflects a 
broad and valuable 
demographic. Festivals 
such as Sundance cater 
to the industry, but the 
Florida Film Festival is 
particularly useful in 
gauging how the gener- 
al market will respond 
to a film. It served as an 
effective vehicle for the 
domestic launch of 
Unmade Beds." 

- Steve Wax, producer 



the southeast's 
premier independent film event 



the eighth 
florida film festival 

June 11-20, 1999 
enzian theater, orlando 

features, documentaries, shorts, animation 

juried competition & audience awards 

plus a cool trailer from bill plympton 

entry deadline • february 26 
late deadline • march : 

p 407»629»1088 • f 407»629«6870 
filmfest@gate.net • www.enzian.org 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 47 



FESTIVALS 




F LMMAKER 




MindSpring 




"Fast gaining a reputation as one of the most innovatively 
programmed of the indie festivals... " - Adam Longer the film festival guide 

Featuring: 

The Annual Taos Land Grant Award 

sponsored by Taos Land & Film Company - Five acres of Taos Land 
for best feature length film 

The George Mies Cinematography Award 

- Film stock and production services 

For Information and entry form send SASE to: 
Taos Talking Pictures - Entries 
7217 NDCBU, 1337 GUSDORF STE. F 
Taos, nm 87571 



1999 

TAOS 

TALKING 

PICTURE 

FESTIVAL 

APRIL 

15-18 



WW CALL FOR ENnTROES 

DEADLINE: 

JANUARY IS, 1999 -w^ 

Phone (505) 751-0637 • Fax (505) 751-7385 

email: ttpix@taosnet.com • www.taosnet.com/ttpix/ 



TOWN OF TAOS 



PSjfflflil) 



A Delta Air Lines 

Official Airline of 
Taos Talking Pictures 



USA FILM FESTIVAL. April, IX, Deadline: early March. Fest has 
3 major components: noncompetitive feature section (now in 
28th yr) ; Nat'l Short Film & Video Competition (in 20th yr)j 
KidFilm (held in mid-Jan). Feature section incl. premieres of 
major new films, new works from ind. & emerging filmmakers, 
special tributes, incl. Great Director award & retro, panel discus- 
sions. To enter, send preview cassette w/ publicity & production 
info. Short film & video competition showcases new & significant 
US work. Entries should be under 60 min., completed after Jan. 
1, 1998. Cash prizes awarded in cats of narrative ($1,000); non- 
fiction ($1,000); animation ($1,000); experimental ($1,000); 
Texas Award ($500); Student Award ($500); advertising promo 
award; Family Award ($500); 4 special jury awards ($250). 
Grand Prize Winner flown to Dallas. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 
3/4", 1/2". Entry fee: $40. Contact: Alonso Duralde, USA Film 
Festival, 2917 Swiss Ave., Dallas, TX 75204; (214) 821-6300; 
fax: 821-6364. 

THE VIDEOGRAPHER AWARDS, TX. Deadline: March 19. Awards 
in Excellence, Distinction & Honorable Mention for video produc- 
tion. Cats: Productions, Creativity, Talent, Government, 
Weddings, Special Events, Legal, Sports, Cable TV 
Commercials/Programs & Videos for Sale. Judges chosen on 
basis of extensive experience & proven creativity in the video 
field. Entries on VHS, SVHS, 3/4", Betacam, BetaSP & CD-Rom 
(PC). Entry fee: $37.50. Contact: The Videographer Awards, 
2214 Michigan, Ste E, Arlington, TX 76013; (817) 459-0488; fax: 
795-4949; tca@imag m.net; www.videoawards.com 

Foreign 

ALGARVE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, May 25-31, 
Portugal. Deadline: March 15. 27th annual fest is longest run- 
ning event of its kind held in Portugal. Films must be produced 
1997 or later & no longer than 30 min. Format: 35mm only. 
Preview on VHS (PAL or NTSC) Entry Fee: None. Contact: Carlos 
Manuel, General Director, Festival Internacional de Cinema do 
Algarve, Box 8091, 1801 Lisboa Codex, Portugal; teh 011 351 1 
851 36 15; fax: 011 351 1 852 11 50; algarvefilmfest® 
mail.telepac.pt; www.algarvefilmfest.com 

CANNES INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, May 12-23, France. 
Deadline: March 15. Largest mt'l film fest, attended by over 
30,000 professionnals, stars, directors, distributors, buyers & 
journalists. Round-the-clock screenings, parties, ceremonies, 
press conferences & one of world's largest film markets. 
Selection committee, appointed by Administration Board, choos- 
es entries for Official Competition (about 20 films) & Un Certain 
Regard section (about 20 films). Films must have been made 
w/in prior 12 mo., released only in country of origin & not entered 
in other tests. Official component consists of 3 sections: 1) In 
Competition, for features & shorts competing for major awards; 
2) special Out of Competition accepts features ineligible for com- 
petition (e.g. by previous winners of Palme d'Or); 3) Un Certain 
Regard, noncompetitive section for films of mt'l quality that do 
not qualify for Competition, films by new directors, etc; 4) 
Cinefondation, new competition (since '98) to present & promote 
short & medium-length fiction or animation films, final year stu- 
dent films or first productions which show artistic qualities that 
deserve to be encouraged, thus helping young filmmakers who 
are at the start of their career. Film market administered sepa- 
rately, screens film in main venue & local theater. Parallel sec- 
tions incl. Qumzame des Realisateurs (Director's fortnight), main 
sidebar for new talent, sponsored by Assoc, of French Film 
Directors (deadline mid April); La Semame de la Critique (Int'l 
Critic's Week), 1st or 2nd features & docs chosen by French Film 
Critics Union (selections must be completed w/in 12 mos prior to 
fest). Top prizes incl. Official Competitions Palme d'Or (feature & 
short), Camera d'Or (best first film in any section) & 



48 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



Cinefondation (best final year student film). Formats: 35mm, 
16mm. Entry fee: None. Contact: Cannes Int'l Film Festival, 99, 
boulevard Malesherbes, 75008 Paris, France; Oil 33 1 45 61 66 
00; fax: Oil 33 1 45 61 97 60. For press accreditation, contact: 
Christine Aime, Oil 33 1 45 61 66 08; fax: Oil 33 1 45 61 97 
61. Cannes Film Market, contact: Jerome Paillard, 99 bd 
Malesherbes, 75008 Paris, France; Oil 33 1 45 61 66 09, fax: 
Oil 33 1 45 61 97 59. Add 'I info: Quinzaine des Realisateurs, 
Societe des Realisateurs de Films, 14 rue Alexandre Parodi, 
75010 Paris, France; Oil 33 1 44 89 99 99, fax: Oil 33 1 44 89 
99 60. Semaine Internationale de la Critique, attn: Eva Roelens, 
73, Rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris, France; teh Oil 33 1 45 75 68 
27; fax: Oil 33 140 59 03 99 

IT'S ALL TRUE INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTARY FILM FESTI- 
VAL, April 9-18. Brazil. Deadline: Jan. 15. Festival takes place 
simultaneously in San Paulo & Rio de Janeiro & intends to exhib- 
it fresh & original documentaries & to promote meetings aiming 
to improve the int'l discussion about the genre. Brazilian & Int'l 
competitions & special retros. Formats: 35mm & 16mm. No 
entry fee. Contact: Amir Labaki, Festival Director, IATIDFF, 
Associacao Cultural Kinoforum, Rua Simao Alvares, 784/2, 
05417.020, San Paolo - SR Brazil; tel/fax: Oil 55 11 852 9601; 
itstrue@ibm.net; www.kmofor/itstrue 

SUNNY SIDE OF THE DOC MARKET & VUE SUR LES DOCS FES- 
TIVAL, May 10-13. France. Deadline: Mar 27. Independent pro- 
ducers, distributors, commissioning editors, heads of television 
programming departments & buyers from all over the world will 
gather again in Marseilles for the 9th annual Sunny Side of the 
Doc Market. Attended last year by some 1,650 producers from 45 
countries & over 200 buyers & commissioning editors represent- 
ing 31 countries. Contact: Sunny Side of the Doc & Vue Sur Les 
Docs, 3 Square Stalingrad, 13001 Marseilles, France; teh Oil 33 
4 91 08 43 15; fax: Oil 33 4 91 84 38 34; 100560.1511@com- 
puserve.com; www.film-fest-marseilles. com 

TOKYO INTERNATIONAL LESBIAN & GAY FILM & VIDEO FESTI- 
VAL, July 16-20. Japan. Deadline: Jan. 15. Ninth annual event is 
the largest lesbian & gay festival in Asia drawing 8,000 viewers 
to 70 films last year. Festival is maior event in Tokyo cultural 
scene & receives nat'l & int'l media coverage. Formats: 16mm, 
35mm, Betacam, 1/2" VHS (NTSC or PAL). Contact (inquiries 
only — no tapes or films) Elyssa Faison; tel/fax: (213) 381-7132; 
efaison@ucla.edu. Main contact & entries to: TILGFVF, 5-24-16 
#601 Nakano, Nakano-ku, Tokyo, Japan 164-0001; Oil 81 3 
5380 5760; fax: Oil 81 3 5380 5767; lgff@tokyo.office.ne.jp; 
www.gender.ne.jp/L-GFF/ 

TORONTO JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL, April 29-May 6, Canada. 
Deadline: Feb. 28. Now in its seventh year, festival is the second 
largest Jewish film festival in North America. It is devoted to 
chronicling the diversity of Jewish life & experiences from around 
the world. Well-supported by the Toronto Jewish community, the 
festival had a record attendance of 12,000 last year. Cats: fea- 
ture, doc, short. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, Beta-SR VHS (Secam, 
PAL). No entry fee. Contact: Shlomo Schwartzberg, Director of 
Programming, 33 Prince Arthur Ave, 2"^ fl., Toronto, Ontario, 
Canada M5R 1B2; (416) 324-8226; fax: 324-8668; tjff@inter- 
log.com; www.tjff.com 

YORKTON SHORT FILM & VIDEO FESTIVAL, May 13-16, 
Canada. Deadline: March 5 (Int'l); March 19 (domestic). Now in 
its 52nd year, this is the longest running festival of its kind in 
Canada. Awards avail, in 18 genre categories, 9 craft cats & 4 
int'l cats. Festival includes public screenings, mini cinema, 
workshops & activities. Contact: YSFVF, 49 Smith St. E„ Yorkton, 
SK S3N DH4; (306) 782-7077; fax: 782-1550; info@yorkton- 
shortfilm.org; www.yorktonshortfilm.org 



CALL 



F O R 



ENTRIES 



4TH ANNUAL STONY BROOK FILM FESTIVAL 

Staller Center for the Arts 

State University at Stony Brook, New York 

Competitions in 1 6mm and 35mm films 
including features, shorts, documentary 
and animation. Largest film screen in the 
region (40 ft. wide) in dolby stereo sound! 
Previous guests and honorees include 
Steve Buscemi, Rod Steiger, Eli Wallach 
and Cliff Robertson. 

For more information, call 516-632-7233 

or email pcohen@notes.cc.sunysb.edu 

Entry forms are available online at www.stallercenter.com/festival 

or write to: Stony Brook Film Festival, Staller Center for the Arts, 

rm 2032, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 1 1 794-5425. 




m Call for Entries 




FIL7W FESTIVAL 

iitk Annual Fill/Video F c s t i v a 

Staller Center for the Arts/Stony Brook & 

Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center 

May 20th-July 30th, 1999 

Call or Write for Entry Forms (Due 4/1/99) 

Christopher Cooke, Director 

Long Island Film Festival 

c/o P.O. Box 13243 

Hauppauge, NY 11788 

1-800-762-4769 . (516) 853-4800 

From 10:00am-6pm, Mon-Fri 

or visit our website at www.lifilm.org 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 49 



NOTICES 



NOTICES OF RELEVANCE TO AIVF MEMBERS ARE LIST- 
ED FREE OF CHARGE AS SPACE PERMITS. THE 
INDEPENDENT RESERVES THE RIGHT TO EDIT FOR 
LENGTH AND MAKES NO GUARANTEES ABOUT THE 
NUMBER OF PLACEMENTS FOR A GIVEN NOTICE. LIMIT 
SUBMISSIONS TO 60 WORDS & INDICATE HOW LONG 
INFO WILL BE CURRENT. DEADLINE: 1ST OF THE 
MONTH, TWO MONTHS PRIOR TO COVER DATE (E.G., 
MAY 1 FOR JULY ISSUE). COMPLETE CONTACT INFO 
(NAME, ADDRESS & PHONE) MUST ACCOMPANY ALL 
NOTICES. SEND TO: INDEPENDENT NOTICES, FIVE 304 
HUDSON ST., 6TH FL, NY, NY 10013. WE TRY TO BE AS 
CURRENT AS POSSIBLE, BUT DOUBLE-CHECK BEFORE 
SUBMITTING TAPES OR APPLICATIONS. 



Competitions 

1998 DGA AWARDS: DGA announces competition for outstand- 
ing directorial achievement in feature film, doc & TV. Open to DGA 
& non-DGA directors. Deadline: Jan. 4. For more info contact: 
Laraine Savelle. DGA Awards, 7920 Sunset Blvd., 6th fl„ LA, CA 
90046; (310) 289-2038; fax: 289-5398; laraine@dga.org; 
www.dga.org 

2nd ANNUAL FILM IN ARIZONA SCREENWRITING COMPETI- 
TION introduces new material that can be filmed regionally to 
entertainment industry. Winning screenwriter receives profes- 
sional script notes, introductory meetings w/ agents & develop- 
ment reps. Contact: Linda Peterson Warren. Arizona Film 
Commission, 3800 North Central Ave., Bldg D, Phoenix, AZ 
85012; (602) 280-1460 or (800) 523-6695. 

BUCK HENRY SCREENWRITING SCHOLARSHIP: two $500 
scholarships to support work of students enrolled in screenwrit- 
mg course of study. Sold or optioned scripts ineligible. Contact: 
American Film Institute (213) 856-7690; www.afionline.org 

ESTABLISHED NONPROFIT GALLERY reviewing membership 
applications. Benefits: local, nat'l, int'l exhibition opportunities 
curatmg & arts mgmt experience, participation in a dynamic pro- 
fessional network. Categories: local, national, video/perfor- 
mance. Submit 16-20 slides, video, vitae, SASE to: Membership 
Chair, ARC Gallery, 1040 W Huron, Chicago, IL 60622. 

F.O.C.U.S. INSTITUTE OF FILM call for screenplays: "original, 
compelling human stories that promote positive values & social 
responsibility — material that endeavors to stir the human spir- 
it." Deadline; May 7. 2-5 screenwriters selected for mentorship 
program & one script will go into production. Proceeds from 
release of films produced by F.O.C.U.S. will est. academic & 
vocational scholarship funds for underprivileged foster children. 
Info & applic. materials available by faxing name, address, ph 
no. to (310) 472-1481 or at www.focusinstituteoffilm.com 

MONTEREY COUNTY FILM COMMISSION SCREENWRITING 
CONTEST Open to writers who have not yet sold scripts to 
Hollywood. All genres & locations accepted. First prize: $1,500. 
Entry fee: $40. Rules & entry forms under "local events" at: 
http://tmx.com/mcfilm; or send SASE to; MCFC, Box 111, 
Monterey, CA 93942; (408) 646-0910. 

NEW CENTURY WRITER AWARDS: Competition open to screen- 
writers, playwrights. & writers of short fiction. Seeking "charac- 
ter-driven" stones in any genre. $4,000 in cash prizes awarded 
to top three entries. Application fee: $25. Deadline: December 
31, 1998. For app., contact: New Century Writer Awards, 43 B 
Driveway, Guilford, CT 06437; (203) 469-8824; ommcron- 
world@snet.net 



They'll SyfiSll 



Seattle's 911 Media Arts Center continues to expand its 
activities, services & member events, as it has done for 
nearly 20 years. It is currently in the process of adding a 
^^ffl for public 

exhibition of downloadable media files and. in conjunction 
with a new AvidMediaComposer8000 intends to become 
"the world's first fully integrated digital and analog screen- 
ing space." Contact: 117 Yale Ave. N, Seattle, WA 98109; 
(206) 682-6552; fax: 682-7422; 911media@media.org 




SET IN PHILADEL- 
PHIA: Screenwnting 
competition, open to all 
screenwriters & all 
genres.seeks feauture 
length screenplays set 
primarily in the Greater 
Philadelphia 
Metropolitanarea. 
Submissions will be 
judged upon overall 
quality and extent to 
which they tell a gen- 
uine Philadelphia story. 
Deadline: Jan. 26. 
Contact: Philadelphia 
Festival of World 
Cmema.3701 Chestnut 
St.. Philadelphia, PA 
19104; (215) 895- 
6593, fax: 895-6562; 
pfwc@libertynet.org; 
www.libertynet.org/ 
pfwc /sip 

SOUTHERN CIRCUIT, a tour of six artists who travel on an 11- 
day, nine-city route, is now accepting applications from 
film/video artists. Artists are asked to submit an appl. form & a 
VHS, 3/4", BETA or 16mm film program of between 45 mins & 2 
hours in length (can be cued for a 30 mm section for judging pur- 
poses) in addition to resume, any press packet materials & a $20 
entry fee. Performance & installation art will not be accepted, nor 
will any works in progress. After a pre-screening process, 40 
finalists will be judged by a selection panel in April. Deadline for 
submission is Jan. 15. For appl. form & more info contact: South 
Carolina Arts Commission, Attn: Brian Newman/Susan Leonard, 
Media Arts Center. 1800 Gervais St., Columbia, SC 29201; (803) 
734-8696; fax: 734-8526; newmanbr@arts.state.sc.us or 
leonarsu@arts. state. sc. us 

VIDEO SHORTS ANNUAL COMPETITION seeks short videos for 
juried screenings open to public. Ten entries chosen as winners; 
top two receive $100, other eight receive $50. plus any revenue 
received from rental or sales. Max. length: 7 minutes. Entry fee: 
$20. add $10 for each additional entry on same cassette; max. 3 
entries per entrant. All entries must include entry form. Tapes & 
boxes must be labeled w/ name, titles & running times. Tapes 
must be in 3/4" or 3/4" SP VHS or S-VHS or DV. VHS tapes also 
accepted in PAL & SECAM. Include SASE if want tapes returned. 
Two categories: General, open to all subjects, & Student, open to 
documentary, animation/FX, music & drama with the theme of 
"Space." Deadline: Feb. 7. For entry form, contact: Video Shorts, 
Box 20295, Seattle, WA 98102; (206) 322-9010. 

Conferences • Workshops 

AFI announces free Kodak- sponsored Professional Training 
Division (PTD) Open House, Jan. 23., llam-5pm. Itinerary 
includes lectures, hands-on computer demonstrations & AFI Film 
Conservatory screenings, class previews, early registration dis- 
counts & class consultation for novices & professionals alike. 
Contact; (213) 856-7690; Event Hotline: (213) 856-7664; www. 
afionline.org 

AVID FEATURE FILM CAMP & Avid Short Film Camp: Digital 
Media accepting submissions for its 1998 & 1999 Filmcamps. 
Filmcamp offers free nonlinear postproduction on feature films & 
shorts. Editors-in-training, under the supervision of an experi- 
enced feature editor, learn postproduction on multiple Avid Media 
Composers while editing your film. Thirteen features & four 



shorts will be accepted before the 
end of 1999. Principal photogra- 
phy & transfer must be completed 
on feature-length film (70+ min.) 
or short (under 70 min.). Can be 
doc, narrative, or experimental. 
Contact: Jaime Fowler, AFFC direc- 
tor: (503) 297-2324; www.film- 
camp.com 



CONTENT '99: May 19-21, CA. 
Deadlines: March 15 (early), April 
27 (regular). The Nat'l Educational 
Media Network presents its 13th 
Annual Media Market and biennial 
conference for producers & dis- 
tributors. Market only one in the 
nation devoted to educational 
works, is seeking submissions by 
film/video producers. Conference 
attendees learn the latest trends 
in production, distribution & exhi- 
bition. Early bird deadline: April 
19. Rates vary; discounts avail, for 
'99 Apple Awards competition entrants. CONTENT will culminate 
in the 29th Annual Apple Awards Film & Video Festival (May 21- 
22) at the Oakland Museum of CA. For info & forms, contact: 
NEMM, 655 13th St., Ste. 100, Oakland, CA 94612; (510) 465- 
6885; fax: 465-2835; content@nemn.org 

CPB Community Forums: Corporation for Public Broadcasting to 
host community forums with Latino producers & public television 
programmers. Purpose: To discuss funding mechanism for Latino 
productions for public television. Forums to be held in selected 
U.S. cities. Space is limited. To apply: call Anna Santariano at 
(202) 879-9686. 

Films • Tapes Wanted 

AIR YOUR SHORTS: new public access cable show seeks short 
films to run & filmmakers to interview. No pay, just satisfaction 
& publicity of having films aired. Sean: (714) 723-6740; 
http://members.aol.com/ShortFilmz 

AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE is accepting entries for its ongoing 
program, The Alternative Screen: A Forum for Independent Film 
Exhibition & Beyond. Send submissions on 1/2" VHS tape. 
Feature-length independent film, doc & new media projects 
wanted. 1800 N. Highland, Suite 717, LA, CA 90028. More info, 
call (213) 466-FILM. 

ARC GALLERY reviewing for solo & group exhibitions. All media 
including video, performance & film. Send SASE for prospectus 
to: ARC Gallery, 1040 W. Huron, Chicago, IL 60622 or call (312) 
733-2787. 

ASHLAND CABLE ACCESS seeks video shows. VHS, S-VHS & 
3/4" OK, any length or genre. For return, incl. sufficient SASE. 
Send w/ description & release to: Suzi Aufderheide, Southern 
Oregon State College, RVTV, 1250 Siskiyou Blvd., Ashland, OR 
97520; (541) 552-6898. 

BALLYHOO!: Central Florida TV show featuring independent film 
& filmmakers is accepting films & videos under 30 mm. Hour- 
long community access show produced by Frameworks Alliance, 
nonprofit organization that also produces Central Florida Film & 
Video Festival. Each Ballyhoo! episode aired twice weekly for one 
month to over 700,000 viewers. Send VHS tape & return postage: 
Frameworks Alliance, c/o Thor Neureiter, 1906 E. Robinson St., 
Orlando, FL 32803. (407) 839-6045; fax: 898-0504. 



50 THE INDEPENDENT January /February 1999 



BIG FILM SHORTS is now accepting short films, any genre, for 
worldwide distribution. Details at (818) 563-2633; www.big- 
filmshorts.com/ 

THE BIT SCREEN premiers original short films, videos & multi- 
media works made specifically for the Internet. We're looking for 
original films scaled in both plot & screen ratio for the Internet; 
films that challenge the assumption of bandwidth limitations. 
Want to define the look of a new medium? For submission guide- 
lines check out www.lnPhiladelphia.com/The BitScreen 

BLACKCHAIR PRODUCTIONS accepting video, film & computer- 
art submissions on ongoing basis for monthly screening program 
called "Independent Exposure." Artists will be paid an honorari- 
um. Looking for experimental, narrative, subversive, animation & 
doc works, but will screen anything. Submit a VHS, clearly 
labeled with name, title, length, phone number along with a SASE 
(for work(s) to be returned). We will get back to you! Send sub- 
missions to: Blackchair Productions, 2318 Second Ave., #313- 
A, Seattle, WA 98121. Info/details: (206) 977-8281, 
joeal@speakeasy.org; www.speak easy.org/blackchair 

CABLE SHOWCASE SEEKS PRODUCTIONS. Send 1/2" or 3/4" 
tapes to: Bob Neuman, Program Director, Laurel Cable Network, 
8103 Sandy Spring Road, Laurel, Maryland 20707. Tapes cannot 
be returned. 

CHICAGO ADULT AMATEUR VIDEO FESTIVAL celebrates the 
worldwide free speech of diverse sexually-oriented lifestyles 
through showcasing all genres of erotic video. Accepting all gen- 
res, under 40 min., 1/2"NTSC or PAL versions. Request info: 
CAAVF, 2501 N. Lincoln Ave.,#198, Chicago, IL 60614- 

2313; (312)910-5224; caavf@juno.com ; www.elbsentertain- 
ment.com/xxx 

CINELINGUA SOCIETY seeks short & feature-length European 
films on video for language project, preferably without subtitles. 
We desire only limited rights. Contact: Brian Nardone, Box 8892, 
Aspen, CO 81612; (970) 925-2805; fax: 925-9880; bnann 
@rof.net; www.rof.net/yp/cinelingua.html 

DOBOY'S DOZENS seeks short films for monthly showcases 
highlighting works by up & coming filmmakers. Contact: Eugene 
Williams or Marceil Wright, Doboy's Dozens, 1525 N. Cahuonga 
Blvd. #39, Hollywood, CA 90028; (213) 293-6544. 

DUTV-CABLE 54, a progressive, nonprofit access channel in 
Philadelphia, seeks works by indie producers. All genres & 
lengths considered. No payment. Will return tapes. VHS, S-VHS, 
& 3/4" accepted. Contact: George McCollough or Debbie Rudman, 
DUTV-Cable 54, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut St., Bldg. 9B, 
Rm. 4026, Philadelphia, PA 19104; (215) 895- 2927; 
dutv@post.drexel. edu 

EXHIBITION OPPORTUNITIES for the 99-00 exhibition season. 
All media considered, including 2-D, 3-D, performance, video and 
computer art. Send resume, 20 slides or comparable documen- 
tation, SASE to: University Art Gallery, Wightman 132, Central 
Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Ml 48858. 

EXHIBIT YOUR FILMS AT GRAND ILLUSION! Seattle's Northwest 
Film Forum seeks 16mm & 35mm shorts (60 min. or less) for on- 
going exhibition. Selected works shown before regular program- 
ming at Seattle's only ind. arthouse theater. Send video & SASE 
to NWFF c/o Grand Illusion, 1403 NE 50th St., Seattle, WA 98105. 

FINISHING PICTURES accepting shorts & works-in-progress 
seeking distribution or exposure to financial resources for CLIPS, 
a quarterly showcase presented to invited audience of industry 
professionals. Deadline: ongoing. Contact: Tommaso Fiacchino, 
(212)971-5846. 

FLOATING IMAGE seeks film/video animation & shorts for pub- 
lic/commercial TV program. Send VHS or S-VHS to Floating Image 




MERCER STREET 



Pro Xools 
TVIedia lOO 

Sound Design • Original Music • Sound Effects 

Voice Over and ADR • Sound Editing and Mixing 

Non Linear Video Editing • Multimedia and Internet 

Alan Berliner • Lisa Lewenz • Jem Cohen • Cathy Cook 
Maria Venuto • Shelley Silver • Brett Morgen • Tony Oursler 
Peggy Ahwesh • Kathy High • Ellen Spiro • Lewis Klahr 
Ardele Lister • Hillary Brougher • Adam Cohen • Greg Bordowitz 

Discount Rates for Independents 



76 MERCER ST. NYC 10012 • 212.966-6794 • E-mailmercerst@aol.com 



s 



M. X 
DIGITAL AUDIO 
- PRODUCTION - 

for Film and Video 
and Multimedia 




^ 






October 21-24, 1999 



[ call for entries ] 

features • documentaries* shorts • animation 
entry deadline — June 15, 1999 



For entry forms: 

Fort Worth Film Festival 

P.O. Box 17206 

Fort Worth, TX 76102-0206 

817.237.1008 

www.fortworthfilmfest.com 
e-mail: fwff@fortworthfilmfest.com 



The Fort Worth Film Festival 
congratulates the 1998 $500 
post-production prize winners: 

(courtesy of Allied Digital Technologies) 

Lowdown 

Director: Michael Scott Myers 

Headless at the Fair 

Director: David Blood 






Got a story to tell? We'll shoot it for you. 
877 77 ABYSS 

We provide a complete range of services which include concept development, scriptwriting, 

storyboard services, producing, directing, set design and construction, single or multiple camera 

location recording, studio recording, and much more ... 

ABYSS FILMS, Inc. uses the latest high-tech equipment with specialized crews to give our 
customers the highest quality product, on-time and on-budget, period. 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 51 




NOTICES 



Productions, Box 7017, Santa Monica. CA 90406 (include SASE 
for return). (310) 313-6935; www.artnet.net/~floatingimage 

"FUNNY SHORTS" requests submissions of funny short films for 
new syndicated TV show. Shorts may be on film or video & must 
be no longer than 20 min. Students, amateurs & professionals 
welcome. Cash & prizes awarded for films chosen for broadcast. 
Tapes not returnable. Send entries on VHS to: Funny Shorts c/o 
Vitascope, Box 24981, New Orleans. LA 70184-4981. 

IN THE COMPANY OF WOMEN: Public access TV show featuring 
the works of women filmmakers. All lengths welcome. Send VHS 
copy, filmmaker's bio, & a SASE to: In the Company of Women, 
139 E. 89th St., Brooklyn, NY 11236 

KINOFIST IMAGEWORKS seeks work with relevance to alterna- 
tive youth culture for screenings & distribution within under- 
ground community. DIY exp. & activist work encouraged. Tapes 
will not be returned. Send VHS to Kinofist Imageworks, Box 1102, 
Columbia. MO 65205; dmwF92@hamp.hampshire.edu 

KNITTING FACTORY VIDEO LOUNGE seeks VHS tapes for on- 
going bi-weekly series. Any genre or subject. Send tape w/ brief 
bio & SASE to: Knitting Factory Video Lounge, Box 1220, Canal St. 
Station, New York. NY 10013. Info: kf_vl@hotmail.com 

MIDNIGHT MATINEE seeks alternative videos for monthly cable 
access show on Maui. Possible Hawaiian distribution. Any top- 
ics, genres; the more "out there", the better. Send S-VHS or VHS 
copy & release w/ SASE. Paradise Productions, 326 Pukalani St.. 
Pukalani, HI 96768. 

NATIONAL COLLEGE TELEVISION NETWORK producers seek 
creative programming, student film & video, animation, music 
videos &/or clips of indie bands. Select entries broadcast nation- 
ally & bands may be invited to perform live for studio audience. 
Contact: Burly Bear Network. 254 West 54th St., New York. NY 
10019; (212) 293-0770; fax 293-0771; burlybear@burlybear. 
com; www.burlybear.com 

NEW BREED FESTIVAL seeks student/ind. shorts (narrative 
only) for bi-monthly cafe screenings in Lambertville. NJ & on NJ 
& PA public access. Send 1/2" VHS & info w/SASE to New Breed, 
217 N. Union St., Lambertville, NJ 08530. 

NEW YORK FILM BUFFS: film society promoting indie films 
seeks 16mm & 35mm features, shorts & animation for ongoing 
opinion-maker screenings during fall & winter seasons. Send 
submission on VHS tape w/ SASE to: New York Film Buffs, 318 
W 15th St.. New York, NY 10011; (212) 807-0126. 

OCULARIS seeks submissions from indie filmmakers for our 
continuing series. Works under 15 min. long will be considered 
for Sunday night screenings where they precede that evening's 
feature, together w/ brief audience Q & A. Works longer than 15 
min. considered for regular group shows of indie filmmakers. 
Works on 16mm w/ optical track only. Send films, together w/ 
completed entry form (download from website) to: Short Film 
Curator, Ocularis, Galapagos Art & Performance Space, 70 N. 6th 
St.. Brooklyn, NY 11211; tel/fax (718) 388-8713; oculans@bill- 
burg.com; www.billburg.com/ocularis 

PARTNERSHIP FOR JEWISH LIFE introduces an ongoing series 
showcasing emerging Jewish filmmakers' work at MAKOR, a 
place for New Yorkers in their 20s & 30s. Now accepting shorts, 
features, docs &/or works-in-progress for screening considera- 
tion & network building. PJL's film program is sponsored by 
Steven Spielberg's Righteous Persons Foundation. More info: Ken 
Sherman at (212) 792-6286; kensherman@makor.org 

PERIPHERAL PRODUCE, presented by Rodeo FilmCo ., is 
Portland-based roving showcase & distr. co-op for exp & under- 
ground film/video. Curated shows exhibited bi-monthly. Formats: 
16mm, VHS. $5 entry fee. Contact: Peripheral Produce, Rodeo 
Film Co., Box 40835, Portland, OR 97240; mattmppro 



duce@msn.com 

QUEER PUBLIC ACCESS TV PRODUCERS: Author seeks public 
access show tapes by/for/about gay. lesbian, bi, drag & trans 
subjects, for inclusion in an academic press book on queer com- 
munity programming. All program genres are welcome. Send VHS 
tapes to: Eric Freedman, Assistant Professor, Communication 
Dept, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Rd., Boca Raton. FL 
33431; (561) 297-3850; efreedma@fau.edu; Please include 
information about your program's history & distribution. 

REAL TV looking for dynamic videos: news, weather, sports, 
bloopers, busts, "caught in the act." Real TV, syndicated, daily 
video magazine, will showcase compelling videos from around 
the world — from professionals as well as amateurs who capture 
video snapshots of life in the 90s. Tapes will not be returned. 
Contact: Real TV, Hollywood Center Studios, Stage 2, 1040 N. Las 
Palmas, Los Angeles, CA 90038; (213) 860-0100. 

SUDDEN VIDEO call for entries. Ind. curators seek short works. 
Looking for experimental works that approximate emotional tone 
of events that inspired their production. Works should be under 
10 min. long & be available on videotape for exhib./distnb. Send 
submissions on VHS & SASE to: Gort/Raad, 17 Edward Ave., 
Southampton, MA 01073. 

UNDERGROUND CINEMA seeks entertaining short films for pro- 
motional video showcasing new black talent. If your short is 
selected. UC will help finance your next project. Call (212) 426- 
1723. 

UNQUOTE TV: 1/2 hr program dedicated to exposing innovative 
film & video artists, seeks works in all genres. Seen on over 60 
cable systems nationwide. Send submissions to: Unquote TV, c/o 
DUTV, 3141 Chestnut St., Bldg. 9B, Rm. 4026, Philadelphia, PA 
19104. 

UPLOAD YOUR VISIONS: The Sync Internet Video Gallery seeks 
short non-commercial ind. films to showcase on website. 
Filmmakers must own rights to all content, incl. music. Send 
videos & written permission to display film to: Carla Cole, The 
Sync, 4431 Lehigh Rd., #301, College Park, MD 20740; (301) 
806-7812; www.thesync.com 

VIDEO IN PARTICULAR @ ART IN GENERAL: Seeks videos 
addressing formalism, cultural self-representation, existential- 
ism & political media. Contact: Laurie Brown, Art in General. 79 
Walker St., New York, NY 10013; (212) 219-0473. 

VIDEO/FILM SHORTS wanted for local television. Directors inter- 
viewed, tape returned w/ audience feedback. Accepting VHS/S- 
VHS, 15 mm. max. SASE to; Box 1042, Nantucket, MA 02554; 
(508) 325-7935. 

VIDEOSPACE BOSTON seeks creative videos for fall & spring 
programming. Any genre & length. Nonprofit/no payment. Send 
VHS, Hi-8, or 3/4" with description, name, phone, & SASE to: 
Videospace, General Submissions, 9 Myrtle St., Jamaica Plain, 
MA 02130. 

VIDEOSPACE AT DECORDOVA MEDIA ARTS ARCHIVE 

DeCordova Museum & Sculpture Park seeks VHS copies of video 
art & documentation of performance, installation art & new gen- 
res from New England artists for inclusion in new media arts 
archive. Info & guidelines: Videospace at DeCordova, DeCordova 
Museum, 51 Sandy Pond Rd., Lincoln, MA 01773-2600. 

WORLD OF INSANITY looking for videos & films to air on local 
cable access channel, particularly anything odd, bizarre, funny, 
cool. Any length. One hour weekly show w/ videos followed by 
info on the makers. Send VHS or S-VHS to: World of Insanity, Box 
954, Veneta, OR 97487; (541) 935-5538. 

WXXI Public Television's "Independent Film Series" wants short 
films/videos, animation, art films & longer-length documentaries 
for possible screenings on weekly primetime series. Topics are 



52 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



your choice, but should be suitable for viewing by general TV 
audience. Submit entries on VHS. It chosen, broadcast quality 
version will be required. More info/entry forms, call: (716) 258- 
0244. 

Publications 

ART ON SCREEN DATABASE offers free listings. Have you pro- 
duced films, videos, CD-ROMs on art or architecture? Send info 
for inclusion in database of over 25,000 prods on visual arts top- 
ics. Prods about artists of color & multicultural arts projects are 
welcomed. Send info to: Program for Art on Film, Inc., c/o Pratt 
SILS, 200 Willoughby Ave., Brooklyn, NY 1 1205; (718) 399-4506; 
fax: 399-4507; artfilm@sils.pratt.edu; www.artfilm.org 

CANYON CINEMA'S 25th Anniversary Catalog (including 1993-5 
supplements) with over 3,500 film & video titles available for 
$20. Call or fax (415) 626-2255; canyon@sj.bigger.net 

FILMMAKER'S RESOURCE: A Watson-Guptill publication by Julie 
Mackaman. A veritable "supermarket of great opportunities — 
more than 150 of them — for a wide variety of filmmakers . . . 
from feature to documentary to educational to animated films." 
Contact: Watson-Guptill, Amphoto, Whitney Library of Design, 
Billboard Books, 1515 B'way, New York, NY 10036. 

GUIDE TO TAX EXEMPTIONS FOR FILMS SHOT IN NY STATE is 

available for producers who want clear instructions on how to 
claim the numerous tax exemptions available in NY state for film, 
television & commercial production. Put together by Empire State 
Development Corp., 51-page reference guide can be obtained by 
contacting NY State Governor's Office or the Tax Office. NY State 
Governor's Office for Motion Picture & Television Development, 
633 3rd Ave., 33rd fl„ New York, NY 10017-6706; (212) 803- 
2330; fax: 803-2369; www.empire.state.ny.us/mptv.htm 

INDEPENDENT PRESS ASSOCIATION— Save the Ideas! Without 
independent sources of ideas & discussion, democracy & dissent 
cannot thrive. The IPA works to nurture & encourage indie publi- 
cations committed to justice for all. To find out more: IPA, Box 
191785, San Francisco, CA 94119; (415) 896-2456; indy- 
press@igc.org; www.indypress.org 

INTERNATIONAL FILM FINANCING CONFERENCE transcripts 
now available. Topics discussed by international financiers, com- 
missioning editors & producers include: Foreign TV as a Source 
for Funding, International Distributors, Finding US Dollars & How 
to Pitch Your Idea. Send $41 to IFFCON, 360 Ritch St., San 
Francisco, CA 94107; (415) 281-9777. 

MEDIAMAKER HANDBOOK: THE ULTIMATE GUIDE FOR THE 
INDEPENDENT PRODUCER: annual guide published by Bay Area 
Video Coalition. Includes: nat'l & int'l film festival listings, dis- 
tributors, exhibition venues, media funding sources, TV broad- 
cast venues, film & video schools. For more info, call: (415) 861- 
3282 

MEDIA MATTERS, Media Alliance's newsletter, provides compre- 
hensive listings of New York area events & opportunities for 
media artists. For a free copy, call Media Alliance at (212) 560- 
2919 or visit their website at www.mediaalliance.org 

Resources • Funds 

ARTIST FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM offered by California Arts 
Council to individual California artists involved in Media Arts & 
New Genre. Artists must show 10 years of previous professional 
experience to be eligible. Must be primary creators of their work. 
Matching funds not required & no specific project must be car- 
ried out with CAC funds. Deadline: Jan. 9, 1999. Contact: Carol 
Shiftman or Wayne Cook, California Arts Council, 1300 I St., Ste. 
930, Sacramento, CA 95814; (916) 322-6555; www.cac.ca.gov 



Pro Tools • Sound Editing 

• Surround Sound • ADR • 
Automated Mix to Picture • 
Foley • SFX • Sound Design 

• Custom Music 



Media 100 XR • HDR Real 
Time FX • Adobe After 
Effects • Photoshop • D3 
Digital • Betacam SP • 
Off-Line • On-Line • Ani- 
mation • Full On-Location 
Services 




601 Gates Road • Vestal, NY 13850 
SERVING INDEPENDENTS SINCE 1971 

1-800-464-9754 



DlPUCATIO\ 



212-242-0444 



POST PRODlCTIO\ 



Media 100 Editing 

Voice Overs 

Quicktime to Tape 

Digital File Transfers 

Video Duplication 

Transfers & Conversions 

145 West 20th St. 

New York, NY 10011 

Fax: 212-242-4419 



NON LINEAR 
EDITING 



Film Festival Duplication Special 



20 VHS Tapes 

w/sleeves & labels 

Independents 

Only 




V 



o 



REAL TIME TRANSITIONS 



BROADCAST ONLINE 
3:1 TO 200:1 OFFLINE 



MULTI-LAYERING 



BETACAM SP EDITING 
HI 8 & 3/4SP — 3/4 AB 

ANIMATION & GRAPHICS 

DUPLICATION 

TRANSFERS from HI8 to BETA 



Phone (212) 219-9240 
Fax (212) 966-5618 




AVID EDIT SUITES 

OFF LINE /ON LINE/3DFX 

Grafix Suite/After Effects 
Audio Design/Mixing/Protools 
V.O. Booth /Read To Picture 



VOICE 



1D4 WEST 29TH ST NY 1DDD1 



212. 244. 0744 



212.244.0690 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 53 



NOTICES 



NEW DAY FILMS is the premiere distrib- 
ution cooperative for social issue media. 
Owned and run by its members, New 
Day Films has successfully distributed 
documentary film and video for twenty- 
five years. 

Call 415.332.7172 



http: //www. newday.com 



Context Studios 

Film & Video Services 



Seeking energetic 
independent makers 
of social issue 
documentaries for 

~f MEMBERSHIP. 



THE 



LOW COST 





film-to-video 

transfer 

• double system 

• time coded transfers 

precise drop frame sync for computer editing 
and original picture matchback 

• mag track recording 

PLUS: 

• non-linear editing 

• 1 6 track digital recording studio 

• film and video screening 

• theater with lights, sound system, multiple 
camera video recording and live switching 

• 10,000 Sf Of Space for rehearsal, 
shooting & set construction 



Context StudiOS • 28 Avenue A 
NY, NY 10009* (212)505-2702 



A not-for-profit media arts 
organization providing access 
to broadcast quality video 
post-production services for artists 
& independent producers at 
drastically discounted rates. 
— ■ Standby also publishes FELIX, 
A Journal of Media Arts and 
Communication. — 



• interformat Online Edit $ 85/hr 

• Digital Audio Post $ 85/hr 

• Digi Beta to D2 Edit $l 20/hr 

• Duplication & Conversions Inquire 

Contact us for other services, 
prices and access information. 



POB 184, New York, NY 10012 
Email: maria@standby.org 
Phone: (212) 219-0951 
Fax: (212) 219-0563 
www.standby.org 




Northeast Negative Matchers, Inc. 



Your Avid Film Composer Matchback Specialists 



Negative cutting & Conforming 

y 35mm 
> 16mm 
y Super 16mm 



the* 1 



u#mzL&*p* 



******** 



k» 



owledge 



; rience! 



413-736-2177 rS4 13-734-12 11 • 800-370-CUTS 



25 Riverview Terrace 
Springfield, MA 1 1 08- 1 603 



www.nenm.com 
e-mail: nenm@nenm.com 



ASIAN AMERICAN ARTS ALLIANCE offers two grant programs: 
Technical Assistance & Regrant Initiative (TARI) & Chase 
Manhattan SMARTS Regrants Program. Total of $75,000 in 
awards available to NYC Asian American arts organizations with 
annual budgets of $100,000 or less. Contact: Marli Higa, (212) 
941-9208 for application details & deadlines. 

CALIFORNIA ARTS COUNCIL offers various grants & programs 
for film & mediamakers. Contact: CA Arts Council, 1300 1 St.. Ste. 
930. Sacramento, CA 95814: (916) 322-6555; (800) 201-6201; 
fax: (916) 322-6575; cac@cwo.com; www.cac.ca.gov 

CITIZEN CINEMA, Inc.. 501[c]3 nonprofit arts education organi- 
zation dedicated to promoting the art of filmmaking is planning to 
establish filmmaking workshops in high schools & is looking for 
donated/used 16mm cameras, sound, lighting & editing equip- 
ment in good working order. Donations of equipment are grate- 
fully accepted & tax deductible. Contact: Dan Blanchfield, 
Executive, at (201) 444-9875. 

CPB COMMUNITY FORUMS: Corporation for Public Broadcasting 
to host community forums with Latino producers and public tele- 
vision programmmers. Purpose: To discuss funding mechanism 
for Latino productions for public television. Forums to be held in 
select U.S. cities. Space is limited. Contact: Anna Santanano, 
(02)879-9686. 

CREATIVE PROJECT GRANTS: Subsidized use of VHS, interfor- 
mat & 3/4" editing suite for md. creative projects. Doc. political, 
propaganda, promotional & commercial projects ineligible. 
Editor/instructor avail. Video work may be done in combination 
w/ super 8, Hi8, audio, performance, photography, artists, books, 
etc. Studio includes Amiga, special effects, A&B roll transfers, 
dubbing, etc. Send SASE for guidelines to: The Media Loft, 727 
6th Ave.. New York, NY 10010; (212) 924-4893. 

INDEPENDENT TELEVISION SERVICE considers proposals for 
new, innovative programs & limited series for public TV on an on- 
going basis. No finished works or applications for development. 
Contact: ITVS, 51 Federal St., Suite 401, San Francisco, CA 
94107; (415) 356-8383. 

MATCHING GRANT FOR RESTORATION offered by VidiPax. 
VidiPax will match 20% of funding received from government, 
foundation or corporate funding agency. Individual artists need 
nonprofit fiscal sponsorship to apply. Video & audiotape restora- 
tion must be performed at VidiPax. Contact: Dara Meyers- 
Kingsley. (212) 563-1999 x 111. 

MEDIA ACTION GRANTS available to organizations for confer- 
ences, workshops & events designed to strengthen upstate 
media arts communities & networking at a state-wide level. 
Events should take place between Feb. 16 & June 30. Grant not 
intended to duplicate funds from other sources, particularly 
NYSCA. Deadline: Feb. 16, 1999. Contact: Media Alliance c/o 
WNET, 450 W. 33rd St., New York, NY 10001; (212) 560-2919. 

NEW DAY FILMS: premier distribution cooperative for social 
issue media, seeks energetic independent film & videomakers w/ 
challenging social issue docs for distr. to nontheatrical markets. 
Now accepting applications for new membership. Contact: New 
Day Films 22D Hollywood Ave., Ho-Ho-Kus, NJ 07423; (201) 
332-7172; www.newday.com 

NEW YORK STATE COUNCIL ON THE ARTS, Electronic Media & 
Film Program announces the availability of up to $25,000 in 
funds for production of independent film by NY State artists. 
Deadline: March 1. For more info: (212) 387-7063; NYSCA- 
Individual Artists Program, 915 Broadway, 8th fl„ New York, NY 
10010; www.nysca.org; dpalmer@nysca.org 

NEXT WAVE FILMS, funded by Independent Film Channel, offers 
finishing funds of up to $100,000 for up to four films/year. 
Budgets must be under $200,000. Contact: Mark Stolaroff, Next 
Wave Films. 2510 7th St., Ste. E, Santa Monica, CA 90405; (310) 
392-1720; paradigm@earthlmk.net 



54 THE INDEPENDENT Januatr/February 1999 



OPPENHEIMER CAMERA: new filmmaker grant program offers 
access to professional 16mm camera system for first serious 
new productions in dramatic, doc, exp, or narrative form. Purely 
commercial projects not considered. Provides camera on year- 
round basis. No appl. deadline, but allow 10 week mm. for pro- 
cessing. Contact: Dana Meaux, Oppenheimer Camera, 666 S. 
Plummer St., Seattle, WA 98134; (206) 467-8666; fax: 467- 
9165; dana@oppenheimercamera.com 

PEN WRITERS FUND & FUND FOR WRITERS & EDITORS WITH 
AIDS. Emergency funds, in form of grants & interest-free loans of 
up to $1,000 given each year to over 200 professional literary 
writers, including screenwriters, facing financial crisis. PEN's 
emergency funds not intended to subsidize writing projects. 
Contact: PEN Amercian Center, 568 Broadway, NY, NY 10012- 
3225; (212) 334-1660. 

OPEN DOOR COMPLETION FUND: Natl Asian American 
Telecommunications Association (NAATA) offers completion 
funding for projects in final stages of postproduction, w/ awards 
averaging $15,000. Works should present fresh & provocative 
takes on contemporary Asian American & Asian issues, have 
strong potential for public TV & be of standard TV lengths (i.e., 30 
mins., 1 hr„ etc.). Contact: Charles McCue, NAATA Media Fund, 
346 Ninth St., 2nd fl., San Francisco, CA 94103; (415) 863- 
0814; fax: 863-7428; charles@naatanet.org; www.naatanet.org 

PACIFIC PIONEER FUND awards $1,000-8,000 grants to emerg- 
ing West Coast (CA, OR, WA) documentary film & videomakers w/ 
non-profit fiscal sponsorship. Student projects ineligible; "spon- 
sor pending" applications not accepted. Deadline: Feb. 1. For 
form, send SASEto: Film Arts Foundation, 346 Ninth St., 2nd fl., 
San Francisco, CA 94103; (415) 552-8760. 

PANAVISION'S NEW FILMMAKER PROGRAM provides 16mm 
camera pkgs to short, non-profit film projects of any genre, incl. 
student thesis films. Contact: Kelly Simpson, New Filmmaker 
Program, Panavision, 6219 DeSoto Ave.. Woodland Hills, CA 
91367-2601; (818) 316-1000 x 220; fax: 316-1111. 

SPECIAL ASSISTANCE GRANTS offered by Illinois Arts Council. 
Matching funds of up to $1,500 to IL artists for specific projects. 
Examples of activities funded: registration fees & travel for con- 
ferences, seminars, workshops; consultants fees for the resolu- 
tion of a specific artistic problem; exhibits, performances, publi- 
cations, screenings, materials, supplies or services. Funds 
awarded based on quality of work submitted & impact of pro- 
posed project on artist's professional development. Applications 
must be received at least 8 weeks prior to project starting date. 
Call for availability of funds. Illinois Arts Council, 100 W. 
Randolph, Ste. 10-500, Chicago, IL 60601; (312) 814-6570 toll- 
free in IL (800) 237-6994; ilarts@artswire.org 

SOROS DOCUMENTARY FUND supports mt'l doc. films & videos 
on current & significant issues in human rights, freedom of 
expression, social justice & civil liberties. Three project cate- 
gories considered for funding: initial seed funds (grants up to 
$15,000), projects in preproduction (grants up to $25,000), pro- 
jects in production or postproduction (average grant $25,000, but 
max. is $50,000). Highly competitive. Proposals reviewed quar- 
terly. More info., contact: Soros Documentary Fund, Open Society 
Institute, 400 W. 59th St., New York, NY 10019; (212) 548-0600. 

UNIVERSITY FILM & VIDEO ASSOCIATION: student grants avail- 
able for research & productions in following categories: narrative, 
documentary & experimental/ammation/multimedia. For applica- 
tion info contact: Prof. Julie Simon, UFVA Grants, U. of Baltimore, 
1420 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21201. 

WOMEN'S FILM PRESERVATION FUND of New York Women in 
Film & Television is seeking proposals for the funding & preser- 
vation or restoration of American films in which women have had 
significant creative positions. Application deadline: March 15. 
Contact: NYWIFT, 6 E. 39th St., New York, NY 10016; (212) 679- 
0870; fax: 679-0899. 



DM 



AJL 



CAN MONTAGE INC 



[spin 



i=;vnm \u'jE.?=i\'j=nri, 'Jiuce l-JU-l 



Award Winning Clients And 
Productions at Reasonable Rates 



A V 



9 & 4 

Film & Video Production 

Post-Production Specialists 

Time Coded Duplication 

Hi-8, VHS, 3/4SP, Betacam SP 
Editing & Dubbing 

Mac Graphics & Digital Effects 



375 West B'way 3R, NY, NY 10012 

3 3 4-8283 



We're a Full-Service Post- 
Production facility for the 
alternative filmmaker. We have 
an ADR/Foley Studio, AVIDs, 
AudioVisions, ProTools, and a 

high-speed, 8-plate, 
supercharged steenbeck. We 

provide creative editors, 
experienced technical support 
and expert post supervision at 

competitive rates. For more 

information, contact Jeanette 

King at (212) 679-2720. Or Fax at 

(212 679-2730. 

SPIN CYCLE POST, INC. 

12 West 27th St., 6th Floor 

New York, NY lOOOl 



ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, FILM-VIDEO 



The University of Miami 
seeks a full-time tenure trac 
teach motion picture producti 
commencing in August, 1999. 
expected to teach beginning, 
16 mm production at the under 
els, be competent in all aspe 
postproduction, and be active 
tion. A specialization in di 
ematography is desirable but 
degree or MFA in motion pictu 
teaching experience is prefer 
tive and commensurate with qu 
ience. The search will remai 
tion is filled. Send resume 



School of Communication 
k assistant professor to 
on for the academic year 
The applicant will be 
intermediate and advanced 
graduate and graduate lev- 
cts of production and 
ly engaged in film produc- 
gital technology and cin- 
not required. Master's 
res required. Prior 
red. Salary is competi- 
alifications and exper- 
n open until the posi- 
to: 



Professor Paul Lazarus 

University of Miami 

School of Communication 

P.O. Box 248127 

Coral Gables, Florida 33124-2030 



An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 55 



iSttiAjSSiriEDS 



[scott@aivf.org] 

DEADLINES: 1ST OF EACH MONTH, 2 MONTHS PRIOR 
TO COVER DATE (E.G. JAN 1 FOR MARCH ISSUE). 
CLASSIFIEDS OF UP TO 240 CHARACTERS (INCL. 
SPACES & PUNCTUATION) COST $25/ISSUE FOR AIVF 
MEMBERS, $35 FOR NONMEMBERS; 240-480 CHAR- 
ACTERS COST $45/ISSUE FOR AIVF MEMBERS, $65 
FOR NONMEMBERS. INCLUDE VALID MEMBER ID#. 
ADS EXCEEDING REQUESTED LENGTH WILL BE EDITED. 
ALL COPY SHOULD BE TYPED AND ACCOMPANIED BY A 
CHECK OR MONEY ORDER PAYABLE TO: FIVF, 304 
HUDSON ST., NY, NY 10013. TO PAY BY CREDIT CARD, 
INCLUDE: CARD TYPE (VISA/MC); CARD NUMBER; 
NAME ON CARD; EXPIRATION DATE; BILLING ADDRESS 
& DAYTIME PHONE. ADS RUNNING 5+ TIMES RECEIVE 
$5 DISCOUNT PER ISSUE. 



Buy • Rent • Sell 

SOHO AUDIO RENTALS: Time code DATs, RF diversity mics. 
playback systems, pkgs. Great rates, great equipment & great 
service. Discounts for AIVF members. Larry (212) 226-2429; 
lloewinger@earthlink.net 

SYSTEM FOR SALE: D-Vision Pro 2.2 Digital Editing system 
includes: 486-50 computer. 9 Gig drive. 20" monitor for dis- 
play, 14" monitor for control, DV Pro 2.2 software, 1 mixing 
board. 1 Altec Lansing speaker set. $5,000 neg. Call: (212) 
794-1982 

VIDEO DECKS / EDIT SYSTEMS FOR RENT I deliver' All 
types/best prices: Beta-SP Deck (Sony UVW-1800) $150/day, 
$450/week. D/Vision nonlinear offline $450/week. S-VHS 
offline $350/week. Canon digital 3-chip camera $200/day. Call 
David (212) 362-1056 

Distribution 

16 YEARS AS AN INDUSTRY LEADER! Respected distributor of 
award-winning video on healthcare, mental health, disability & 
related issues, seeks new work Fanlight Productions, 47 
Halifax St., Boston, MA 02130; (800) 937-4113; www.fan- 
light.com 

A+ DISTRIBUTOR since 1985 invites producers to submit 
quality programs on VHS w/ SASE for distributor consideration. 
Mail to Chip Taylor Communications; 15 Spollett Dr., Derry, NM 
03038. www.chiptaylor.com 

AQUARIUS HEALTH CARE VIDEOS Leading distributor of out- 
standing videos because of outstanding producers. Join our 
collection of titles on disabilities, mental health, aging, nursing, 
psychosocial issues, children & teen issues. For education- 
al/health markets. Leslie Kussmann, 5 Powderhouse Lane, 
Sherborn, MA 01770; (508) 651-2963; www.aquariusproduc- 
tjons.com 

ATA TRADING CORP , actively & successfully distributing inde- 
pendent products for over 50 yrs., seeks new programming of 
all types for worldwide distribution into all markets. Contact: 
(212) 594-6460; fax 594-6461. 

LOOKING FOR AN EDUCATIONAL DISTRIBUTOR? Consider the 



University of California. We can put 80 years of successful 
marketing expertise to work for you. Kate Spohr : (510) 643- 
2788 or www-cmil.unex.berkeley.edu/media/ 

SEEKING EDUCATIONAL VIDEOS on guidance issues such as 
violence, drug prevention & parenting for exclusive distribution. 
Our marketing gives unequaled results. The Bureau for At-Risk 
Youth, Box 760, Plainview, NY 11803; (800) 99-YOUTH x. 210. 

Freelancers 

35MM / 16MM PROD. PKG w/ cinematographer. Complete 
studio truck w/ DP's own Arri 35BL, 16SR, HMIs, dolly, jib 
crane, lighting, grip, Nagra . . . more. Ideal 1-source forthe low 
budget feature! Call Tom today for booking (201) 807-0155. 

AATON CAMERA PKG. Absolutely perfect for independent fea- 
tures. Top of the line XTR Prod w/ S16, time-code video, the 
works! Exp DP w/ strong lighting & prod skills wants to collab- 
orate in telling your story. Andy (212) 501-7862; circa@inter- 
port.net 

ACCLAIMED & UNUSUAL instrumental band can provide 
music for your next project. Contact "Magonia" for demo: (781) 
932-4677; boygirl@mediaone.net 

ACCOUNTANT/BOOKKEEPER/CONTROLLER: Experience in 
both corporate & nonprofit sectors. Hold MBA in Marketing & 
Accounting. Freelance work sought. Sam Sagenkahn (212) 
481-3576. 

AVID EDITOR w/ or without Avid. Exp w/ features, docs, trail- 
ers, episodic TV. Low budget indie rates available. Dnna (212) 
561-0829. 

AWARD-WINNING EDITOR, w/ Avid and Beta SP facility. 
Features, shorts, doc, music videos, educational, industrials, 
demos. Trilingual: Spanish. English, Catalan. (212) 627-9256. 

BETA SP videographer w/ new Sony Betacam SR mics & lights. 
Very portable, lightweight & I'm fast. Experience includes: 
docs, interviews, industrials, fashion shows & comedy clubs. 
Please call John Kelleran (212) 334-3851. 

BETA SP VIDEOGRAPHER, skilled in everything from exterior 
hand-held to Rembrandt interior lighting styles, seeking inter- 
esting projects to shoot. Has attractive Sony Betacam SP cool 
sets of lights & sensitive microphones. Willing to travel. Yitzhak 
Gol (718) 591-2760. 

BRENDAN C. FLYNT Director of Photography w/ 15 feature 
credits & dozen shorts. Owns 35 Arri, Super 16/16 Aaton, 
HMIs, Tungsten, & dolly w/ tracks. Call for quotes & reel at 
tel/fax: (212) 226-8417. ela292@aol.com. Credits: Tromeo 
and Juliet, The Offering, Fine Young Gentlemen, Brushfire-, 
wwwdp-brendanflynt.com 

CAMERAPERSON: Visual storyteller loves to collaborate, 
explore diverse styles & formats. Brings passion & productivi- 
ty to your shoot. Award-winner w/ latest Super/ Std.16 Aaton 
XTR prod pkg. Todd (718) 222-9277; wacass@concentric.net 

CAMERAPERSON: Straight from Europe, bicontmental experi- 
ence in features and feature-length documentaries. Ambitious, 
unusual, awarded. Call Wolfgang at (718) 596-3907; 
lewo@compuserve.com 

CINEMATOGRAPHER w/ Aaton & lighting, looking forward to 
working w/ collaborative directors on: narratives, exp, docs, 



RS.A.s, music videos. Steven Gladstone (718) 625-0556 for 
new reel. Email: VEENOTPH@aol.com 

CINEMATOGRAPHER w/ Aaton reg/S-16mm pkg w/ video tap 
& more. Credits in features, shorts & music videos of diverse 
styles w/ special interest in docs. Great rates for compelling 
visions. Kevin Skvorak (212) 229-8357. 

CINEMATOGRAPHER/TV PRODUCER: Prof. & exp filmkr/ 
videographer. Owner super dgtl. cam. pkgs. nonlinear dgtl. edit 
sys, known for hi. qual. features, comm, doc. MTVs. Best 
rates/serv. in S. Cal. LTS Studio, Box 3531, Rsmd, CA 91770; 
tel/fax: (626) 287-5028 

COMPOSER: Perfect music for your project. Orchestral to tech- 
no — you name it! Credits incl. NFL, PBS, Sundance, Absolut. 
Bach, of Music, Eastman School. Quentin Chiappetta (718) 
383-6607; qchiap@el.net 

COMPOSER for film/video, new media projects. Innovative 
sounds that won't strain your pocketbook. For a free demo & 
brochure, contact Progressive Media Arts at: (415) 550-7172; 
pma@progmedia.com; www.progmedia.com 

COMPOSER: Affordable original music in any style that 
enhances the mood/message of your project. Save money 
without compromising creativity. Full service digital recording 
studio, Yale MM. FREE demo CD/initial consultation/rough 
sketch. Call Joe Rubenstein; (212) 242-2691; joe56@earth- 
link.net 

COMPOSER FOR FILM/TV: Academy Award winning. 
Broadcast: PBS, NBC, ABC, CBS. Highly experienced & dedi- 
cated. Music in all styles w/ an original touch. Complete digi- 
tal studio. Reasonable rates. Leonard Lionnet (212) 980-7689. 

DIGITAL VIDEO Videographer/DP with Canon 3-CCD digital 
videocam; prefer documentaries; video-assist for films; docu- 
mentation for dance and performace, misc. projects. 
Reasonable. Alan Roth (718) 218-8065; or e-mail: 
365892@newschool.edu 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY w/ complete Arri-zeiss 16mm 
pkg. Lots of indie film experience. Features, shorts and music 
videos. Save money and get a great looking film. Willing to 
travel. Rates are flexible and I work quickly. Matthew: (914) 
439-5459 or (617) 244-6730. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: Award winning, exp, looking for 
interesting projects. Credits incl. features, docs & commercials 
in the U.S., Europe & Israel. Own complete Aaton Super 16 pkg 
& lights. Call Adam for reel. (212) 932-8255 or (917) 794- 
8226. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY w/ awards, talent & experience. 
Credits include features, commercials, docs, shorts & music 
videos. Owner of Aaton 16mm/Super 16mm pkg, 35mm pkgs 
also available. Call for reel. Bob (212) 741-2189. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY w/ own 35mm sync sound 
Arnflex BLII avail. Beautiful reel, affordable rates. Crew on 
standby. Work incl. several features, shorts, music videos. 
Travel no problem. Dave (718) 230-1207; pager (917) 953- 
1117. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY looking for interesting features, 
shorts, ind. projects, etc. Credits incl. features, commercials, 
industrials, short films, music videos. Aaton 16/S-16 pkg 
avail. Abe (718) 263-0010. 



56 THE INDEPENDENT january/Fehninry 1999 



DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: Owner 16mm Aaton, plus 
35mm non-sync and hand-crank cameras. Experimental back- 
ground; creative look. Shooting credits include: Features, 
shorts, promos, commercials & music videos. New York based, 
will travel. Carolyn (888) 602-1774. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: 35mm, S16mm/16mm. 
Creative, experienced, award winning, w/ teature, ads, docs, 
music videos & industrial credits. Own Am SR 1 S16/16mm 
pkg w/Zeiss lens, tungstens, sound pkg; LKB Prod.: (718) 802- 
9874. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY with Am SR II w/ tap, and 
Panavision filters, Sony Beta SR HMIs, Kino Flos, Jimmy Jib & 
grip truck. I make great pictures, work fast & have tons of 
experience. Call for reel (203) 254-7370; pager: (917) 824- 
3334. 

DOCUCREW WEST: Award-winning writer, producer, director 
w/ new Betacam (D-30) pkg. Trilingual in English, Spanish & 
German. Let us help shape your project. Reasonable rates. 
Near San Diego. Mark (760) 630-7201. 

DP w/ full postproduction support. Experienced film/video DP 
w/ 16:9 digital & 16mm film cameras, lighting/sound gear & 
complete nonlinear editing services. Call (212) 334-4778 
Derek Wan, H.K.S.C. for reel & low "shoot & post" bundle rates. 

EDITOR W/ EQUIPMENT: Producer/director w/ 18 years expe- 
rience in advertising & industrial work available for projects. 
Just completed NEH historical doc for NYU. (212) 952-0848; 
Ruvn@aol.com 

EDITOR WITH AVID, 14 years experience, including 4 features. 
Full featured Avid MC1000 w/ AVRs 3-77, 3D DVE, Ultimatte & 
film matchback. Low price package deals for independent pro- 
jects. Contact Dan Lantz at (610) 337-3333. 

ENTERTAINMENT ATTORNEY: frequent contributor to "Legal 
Brief" columns in The Independent & other magazines offers 
legal services on projects from development to distribution. 
Reasonable rates. Robert L. Seigel, Esq.: (212) 307-7533. 

ENTERTAINMENT ATTORNEY: Former AIVF exec. dir. and an 
ITVS founder offering legal & business services to indies at rea- 
sonable rates. Over 4 years experience as biz affairs exec, at 
NYC production/distribution companies. Contact Lawrence 
Sapadm (718) 768-4142. 

INNOVATIVE EDITOR w/ Avid available for challenging projects. 
Experienced in fiction features, commercials, music video & 
documentary. Reel available. Rodney (718) 246-8235. 

JOHN BASKO: Documentary cameraman w/ extensive interna- 
tional network experience. Civil wars in Beirut, El Salvador, 
Nicaragua, Tiananmen Square student uprising. Equipment 
maintained by Sony. (212) 727-7270; fax: 727-7736. 

LINE PRODUCER/PM/AD/CONSULTANT will prepare script 
breakdown, prod boards, shooting schedule, budget. Full 
investor pkg avail. Also avail, for production. Low budget indie 
rates avail. Call (212) 340-1243. 

LOCATION SOUND: Over 20 yrs sound exp. w/time code Nagra 
& DAT, quality mics. Reduced rates for low-budget projects. 
Harvey & Fred Edwards, (518) 677-5720; beeper (800) 796- 
7363 (ext./pin 1021996); edfilms@worldnet.att.net 

SONY VX1000 DIGITAL CAMERA w/ cameraman. Kenko wide 




IDEOHH 

ON PEARL ST. 



minutes from 

Tribeca 
East Village 
Washington Square 



DOCUMENTARY 
■ COMMERCIAL 
ADVERTISING 



BROADCAST QUALITY BVU900 system 

2 slow-motion sources w/frame accurate matchbacks 

digital audio record and layback 

CMX style editing 21 2.952.0848 

edls saved to ascii files filmtape@aol.com 







Learn 

Film 

Making 

in Vermont 





B.A. Degree program. 

Learn from successful independent 

filmmakers in beautiful Burlington, 

Vermont. Call for more information. 



infffi Burlington 
S§g§ College 

Dept. MM, 95 North Ave. Burlington IT 05401 
1-800-862-9616 www. burlcol.edu 



ANCHOR/ 

NEWS DESK 

SETS 



VIDEO- 
CONFERENCING 



SATELLITE 
MEDIA TOURS 



CORPORATE 
VIDEOS 

i 

LOCATION 
CREWS 

EDIT Si 



NTV 

is a division of 

NTV 

International 

Corporation 



contact: 

ElyseRabinowitz 212-489-8390 

NTV STUDIO PRODUCTIONS 

50 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA 

NYC 10020 



VIDEO 



production 

Satellite 

services 




Digital Betacam, Avid 
MC 8000s PCI AVRs ls- 
77, Film Composers, 
Betacam SP, 5/4 U-Matic 
SP. S-VHS, Hi-8, Magni 
Waveform /Vector scope, 



post 

391 



Avid 1 HIRE 



Mackie mixers, Genelec 
Audio Monitors, etc... 



212.843.0840 

No. 200 Varick St. Room 501 NYC 10014 




Onune\Offline Suites 

Post Production Support 

Digital Betacam 

Editorial 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 57 



WE HAVE MOVED 

632 broadway 473-3040 



New facilities include: 



MORE AVIDS: 400S-8000S On-/Off-Line 
DUPLICATION: Dubs and Transfers 
SOUND BOOTH: Voice Over, ADR, Foley 
AUDIO POST: ProTools 24 Digital Edit/Mix 
Still at B'way & Houston. Still Fri 



PRODUCTIONS 



Experienced, & Helpful. 




( Y£jCl¥& in the comfort 
of a private edit suite 



component interformat studio: 

betacam-sp,3/4",hi-8,s-vhs 

3d animation/graphics/cg 



Video for Art's Sake 

Independent Post Production 
in the East Village 



Meg Hanley, Editor 

212.254.1106 




Classes offered monthly 

Introduction to Media Composer, 
Tips and Techniques, and Media 
Composer Effects. 



The Wexner Center for the Arts is an 
Avid Authorized Education Center 
serving Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, 
Western Pennsylvania and Kentucky. 

Call for more information 

Maria Troy, 674 292-7617 

Wexner Center for the Arts 

The Ohio State University 
1871 North High Street 
Columbus, Ohio 43210 



44&f\ All In One Productions 

*-■ • "**• Your Low Budget Production Paradise 

Newest Software V4.5 — Real Time Audio Effects! 

MOCl 1 3 100 All You Can Play! As low as $200/Day 
Non-Linear Digital Editing System FOR RENT 




Digital 
video 



Up to 72 GB A/V Array, 300 MB of RAM, InsertyAssemble Editing... 
After Effects, Boris Effects, Photoshop. Illustrator, ProTools, Mini Disk... 
Betacam SP, 3/4", DVCPP.O. DVCAM, Mini DV. SVHS, Hi-8, DAI. 

Digital Cameras, Lighting & Sound Equipm ent for Ren t 
Cameraman & Crew Available <C jTow r ates~" 
(212) 334 4778 401 Broadway. Suite 2012. New Y. 
No Job too Big IMo Budget Too 



angle lens, Sennheiser ME 66 shotgun mic, boom, XLR 
adapter, pro tripod, 3 Bescor4 hour batteries. $150/day. (212) 
677-6652. 

STEADICAM: Dolly smooth moves w/ the flexibility of a hand- 
held camera. Call Sergei Franklin (212) 228-4254. 

VISUAL MUSIC/PURE AUDIO DALI, Exp., eclectic composer 
avail for collaboration. Techno-orchestral, hick-hop 
collages/ambient sound design. Billy Atwell at foreHEAD pro- 
ductions (212) 576-TUNE. Jeunet/Caro; Lynch; S. Shepard 
types pref. Animation! 

WHY SHOOT BETA? Documentary DP with Panasonic DV cam- 
era available $450/day. Will also shoot short films (16mm) for 
free. Lisa (212) 406-1297; pager: (917) 874-1021. 

Opportunities • Gigs 

DEPT. OF MEDIA STUDY at SUNY/Buffalo is seeking to fill two 
tenured/tenure track positions (assistant/associate professor) 
in fall 1999; a Digital/Media Artist and a Film/Media Theory 
position. Both positions are contingent on funding. We prefer 
applications received by March 15, but the positions will 
remain open until filled. Send letter of application, work sam- 
ple (accompanied by SASE), curriculum vitae (including 
names of 3 references) and, if avail., a published writing sam- 
ple to: Roy Roussel, Interim Chair, Dept of Media Study, 231 
Center for the Arts, State Univ. of NY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 
14260; roussel@acsu.buffalo.edu; (716) 645-6902 x. 1493. 
Women and minorities encouraged to apply E0/AA employer. 
For more info on the two positions, visit our website: 
http://wings.buffalo.edu/academic/department/AandL 
/media_study/ 

OPPORTUNITY AVAILABLE: Graduate Fellowships and 
Graduate Assistantships tuition and stipend in Computer 
Graphics, Film, Photography & Video available to qualified 
individuals in Art Media Studies, School of Art & Design, 
Syracuse University for fall 1999. Deadline: Jan. 10. Write: The 
Graduate School, 303 Bowne Hall, Syracuse University, 
Syracuse, NY 13244 

PRODUCTION FACULTY, Asst. Prof., Univ. of TX at Austin. 
Demonstrated film/video expertise, esp. location sound, sound 
design & post. Strong production record, teaching experience 
undergrad/grad. MFA or equal. Salary commensurate w/ expe- 
rience. Minorities urged to apply. Cover letter, resume, work 
sample(s), names of refs. (postmarked by 2/15/99) to: Paul 
Stekler, Dept. of Radio-TV-Film, UT Austin, Austin, TX 78712. 
For detailed job description: berth@mail.utexas.edu 

ROCHESTER, NY seeks Film Office Director. Salary $35-45K, 
Bachelor's Degree required. Resume to: Thomas F. Hall, 
President, Greater Rochester Visitors Association, 126 
Andrews St., Rochester, NY 14604 

SEEKING TO HIRE proposal writer experienced with cable and 
foreign documentary TV markets. Please call (212) 431-4428; 
J12R@aol.com 

WELL-ESTABLISHED freelance camera group in NYC seeking 
shooters and sound recordists with Betacam video experience 
to work with our wide array of news & news magazine clients. 
If qualified, contact C0A immediately at (212) 505-1911. 



58 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



Preproduction • Development 

DIRECTOR: Looking for short (under 15 min.) film scripts. Will 
co-produce or provide financing. Esp. alternative viewpoints, 
art or humor. Email treatment or synopsis to: Iisal31@ 
erols.com 

SU-CITY PICTURES: The Screenplay Doctor, The Movie 
Mechanic: We provide screenplay/treatment/synopsis/films- 
in-progress insight/analysis. Studio credentials include: 
Miramax & Warner Bros. Competitive rates. Brochure: (212) 
219-9224; www.su-city-pictures.com 

VIETNAM NOVEL Long Ride Back now OP after three printings 
in the US. Film rights have reverted to the author. Available for 
option/purchase from John Jacob, 417 S. Taylor, Apt. 3B, Oak 
Park, IL 60302. 

POSTPRODUCTION 

16MM & 35MM OPTICAL SOUNDTRACKS: If you want "High 
Quality" optical sound for your film, you need a "High Quality" 
optical sound negative. Mike Holloway, Optical Sound Chicago, 
Inc., 676 N. LaSalle St., #404, Chicago, IL 60610; (312) 943- 
1771, or eves: (847) 541-8488. 

16MM CUTTING ROOMS: 8-plate & 6-plate fully equipped 
rooms, sound-transfer facilities, 24-hr access. Downtown, 
near all subways & Canal St. Reasonable rates. (212) 925- 
1500. 

1GMM SOUND MIX only $100/hr. Interlocked 16mm picture & 
tracks mixed to 16 or 35mm fullcoat. 16mm/35mm post ser- 



vices: picture & sound editorial, ADR, interlock screening, 
16mm mag xfers (.06/ft) 16mm edgecoding (.015/ft) Call Tom 
(201)807-0155. 

AVID 8000: Why rent an Avid Media Composer 400 when you 
can get an 8000 for less' Avid Media Composer 8000; real- 
time fx ; 4 channel pro-tools; 24 hr access. Seriously unbeat- 
able prices!' (212) 375-0785; (718) 638-0028. 

AVID 8000 & 1000 SUITES: Pleasant, friendly, comfortable 
Upper West Side location. On-line & off-line, AVR 77; reason- 
able & affordable rates. Tech support provided. (212) 595- 
5002; (718) 885-0955. 

BRODSKY & TREADWAY Film-to-tape masters. Reversal only. 
Regular 8mm, Super 8, or archival 16mm to 1" or Betacam SR 
We love early B&W & Kodachrome. Scene-by-scene only. 
Correct frame rates. For appt. call (978) 948-7985. 

FOR RENT OFF-LINE AVID In a spacious air-conditioned 

suite, located at 180 Vanck. Avid 1000; AVR 3-77; 69 GB 
Storage; Beta Deck; Media Composer 6.5.3.; Power Mac 9600. 
Available Oct. 1998. Please call Moxie Films, Inc. (212) 620- 
7727. 

MEDIA 100 for rent in Boston: Excellent rates! Top of the line 
XR system with 300 KB resolution; 32 gigs hard drive space; 
Beta SP deck; private office with 24-hour access and beautiful 
garden. Call Liz Canner (617) 266-2418. 

MEDIA 100 EDITING Broadcast quality, newest software. Huge 
storage & RAM. Betacam, 3/4", all DV formats, S-VHS, Hi-8. . . 
Great location, friendly environment & low rates, tech support, 
talented editors & FX artists available 212-431-9299. 



GEZ; 



MEDIA 100 EDITOR: Accomplished visual storyteller will edit 
on your equipment or in my fully-equipped project studio. 
Credits: several narrative projects, major ad agencies (Young & 
Rubicam, Warwick Baker & O'Neill, Seiden Group), accounts 
(Johnson & Johnson, Arm & Hammer, PSE&G), and corp. pro- 
jects (The Equitable, USA Today, CUNY, SUNY). Studio w/ Media 
100XS (300KB), 54GB storage, Beta, Scanner, DAT, Photoshop, 
Illustrator, AfterEffects. John Slater (800) 807-4142. 

MEDIA 100 PCI, broadcast quality, real time suite: Beta-SR 
Hi8, 3/4", VHS, AfterEffects, Elastic Reality, PhotoShop, 
Illustrator, Hi Res Scanner. Short- & long-term TV or feature 
projects in comfortable Tribeca setting. (212) 941-7720. 

THE MEDIA LOFT, "High-end look at low-end prices 1 " VHS & 
3/4" suites, Hi8 video, Super-8 film, audio & photo services. 
Call Bill Creston: (212) 924-4893. 

OUTPOST Digital Productions: 3 rooms, all MedialOO V-4.5 
broadcast quality. Beta, DV, Hi8, VHS; AfterEffects, Deck 2. Lots 
of drive space; great editors or self-operate. Low rates, free 
coffee. (718) 599-2385. Williamsburg; outpostvideo.com 



POST OFFICE EDIT SUITES: Avids (400S & 8000) at low sub- 
sidized rates for indies from $500/wk. Cut in a creative film 
community in Tribeca/Soho. Also complete VX-1000 digital 
cam/audio pkg$150/day. (212) 685-7166; (917) 687-7166. 



To place a Classified, call 
(212) 807-1400 x. 229 




North Carolina. 
School of the Arts 

Interviews are scheduled on campus. For more information, write: Admissions, 

North Carolina School of the Arts, 1533 S. Main St., Winston-Salem, NC 27127-2188, 

or telephone (336) 770-3291, or visit us online: www.ncarts.edu 

An equal opportunity institution of the University of North Carolina. 




rMEDIA 



ARTS i 

PRODUCTION 



sxtary 
ficti' 
cross-genre 

, interactive 
digital 
media 



vw-tm 
L p://ww. 



for fall '98 

"50-6448, 
'.cuny.edu/cfv/ 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 59 




www.aivf.org 



by Michelle Coe & 
Vallery Moore 



Happy New Year! The staff and 
board of AIVF are optimistic that 
1999 will prove to be an eventful 
year with the launch of new pro- 
grams, services, and discounts. (For 
one, in terms of insurance benefits, 
we are currently involved in discus- 
sions with C&S International 
Insurance Brokers to expand our existing poli- 
cies.) We are also looking forward to building a 
stronger online community through the redesign 
of www.aivf.org. Members can access online 
areas and events exclusive to AIVF. Eugene 
Hernandez of IndieWIRE is overseeing this pro- 
ject. Speaking of community, some of the AIVF 
salons are really on the move. For example, the 
914 Salon (in Westchester, New York) never fails 
to amaze us. They keep busy hosting packed pan- 
els such as "The Making of an Independent Film" 
and publishing a newsletter. Check out the pic of 
co-organizer Jonathan Kaplan, director/writer 
Mary Harron (I Shot Andy Warhol), director John 
Walsh, and film critic Marshall Fine in our Salons 
list [p. 64], as they take time out to become 
acquainted. 

If you have any good news or AIVF salon pic- 
tures to share, please send them to me. Don't for- 
get to include a short description along with all 
photos submitted. Who knows, maybe you'll be 
highlighted in the next issue of The Independent. 
Until next time! 

Val Moore, membership director 

As Program and Information Services 
Director, I am honored to be able to introduce 
myself within the context of the new issue. I feel 
the new look of The Independent symbolizes a 
turning point of AIVF. We are expanding the 
existing programs while offering new ones in our 
mission to present the best possible information 
resources to independent film- and videomakers. 
Here's a preview of what's in the works for 
AIVF members: 

• An updated and expanded Resource Library; 

• A mentoring program wherein questions can 
be answered directly by the pros; 



• One-on-one sessions with attorneys to assist 
members with legal issues and with grant writers 
to advise on proposals. 

We plan to offer more events — informative, 
networking, and otherwise — on a regular basis, 
including launching such series as: Up Close: 
Conversations with Filmmakers (see Feb.), In 
Brief: Informative Sessions with Industry 
Professionals; and TechSpeak, which will cover 
technical aspects of production/postproduction 
and include visits to equipment and post houses. 
Keep an eye out for these new and exciting 
opportunities to expand your knowledge — and 
your rolodex! 

Michelle Coe 
program and information services director 



January/February Events 

Many events take place at the AIVF office: 304 
Hudson St. (between Spring & Vandam) 6th floor, 
in New York City. Subways: 1, 9 (Houston Street); 
C, E (Spring Street); A (Canal Street). 

We encourage people to RSVP for events (larger 
events require 50% fee deposit to save seats) as well 
as check in for updates and potential time changes. 

Note: The following is a listing of events whose 
details were being confirmed at press time. Please 
visit our website: www.aivf.org or our Event 
Hotline: (212) 807-1400 x. 301 for the latest info. 

JANUARY 

EVENTS PENDING: check www.aivf.org 

FEBRUARY 

New Events Series! 

Up Close: Conversations with Filmmakers 

This series presents personal insight and advice 
from one filmmaker to another. Featured guests 
will discuss their processes and styles, and reflect 
on their careers in the industry. Clips may be 
shown of their latest work, with full screenings 
when possible. 

Going Digital (in Two Parts) 

Part I: Hal Hartley's The Book of Life, present- 
ed by producers Matthew Myers and Theirry 
Cagianut, and editor Steve Hamilton 



Moderated by Eugene Hernandez 
Wlien: February (date/time TBA) 
Where: TBA 

Cost: $10 AIVF members; $15 general public 
To register/for details: (212) 807-1400 x. 301. 
Don't miss this rare screening of Hal 
Hartley's latest work, The Book of Life, shot 
entirely on digital video. Following the 
screening, the key creative team will give an 




in-depth case study of how they produced the 
film and reflect on their decision to work in 
the digital medium. Space is limited, so don't 
miss the launch of this exciting new series! 



Workshop — Trench Warfare: 
Surviving Independent Film 

with In the Company of Men producer 
Mark Archer 

When: Saturday, Feb. 13, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Where: AIVF office 

Fee: $95 AIVF members; $115 general public 
To register: RSVP to (212) 807-1400 x. 301. 
50% min. deposit required to reserve space; 
cash, checks, Visa/Mastercard acceptable. 

Get in on one producer's strategies in the 
business of low-budget producing as Mark 
Archer presents a case study of the 
acclaimed In the Company of Men. Knowing 
production basics isn't enough; find out 
which tactics work and which do not. 
Archer, who has produced and directed 



60 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



fiction and nonfiction projects for film and tele- 
vision for nearly six years, will discuss producing 
from A to Z, including budgeting the no-budget 
film; targeting potential buyers before the film is 
in the can; and working outside the system with 




what resources you have. Attendees will receive 
a comprehensive reference binder with valuable 
reference materials. 

Meet & Greet. 

The Sundance Channel 

with Tom Harbeck (Exec. VR Programming 

& Creative Director) and Liz Manne 

(Senior VR Programming & Marketing) 

When: Tuesday, Feb. 9th, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. 

Where: AIVF office 

Cost: Free to members; $10 general public 

To register/for details: RSVP to (212) 807-1400 x. 

301. Tickets also at the door. 

The Sundance Channel is a prime outlet for cut- 
ting-edge filmmakers. Films like Watermelon 
Woman, Red Meat, and Nowhere Fast are a few of 
the new acquisitions in the spotlight. The chan- 
nel has announced four new programming blocks 
featuring emerging filmmakers, shorts, and docu- 
mentaries. Meet the executives and get the 
details on what the Sundance Channel can offer 
you! (For more on the Sundance Channel, see 
pg. 22) 

AIVF Hosts: CPB Community Forum 

When: January/February (date/time TBA) 
Where: AIVF office 

For more information contact: Anna Satariano at 
the CPB (202) 879-9686. 

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting will 
host a community forum with Latino producers 
and public television programmers at the AIVF 
office. The purpose is to discuss the future direc- 
tion for Latino productions for public television, 
in the light of the newly appointed Latino Public 
Broadcasting Project. For more information, call 
Anna Satariano at the number listed above. 
Note: Space is limited to 20. 

OUTSIDE NEW YORK: 

Advocacy forum: 



Production and Post 
Non Linear Offline & Online 

Beta to Beta From All Sources 
A Professional Facility 

Intelligent Solutions 

(And, oh, in case you need to space out, 

we've got a cool view of the city, too) 

New York City (Union Square) 

212.529.2875 www.pixbiz.com 



mm 

BUSINESS 

PRODUCTIONS INC 



Betacam SP 

DV & DVCAM 

3/4 SP Hi-8 SVHS 
Component Editing 

Transfers, Window Dubs 
45/hr 340/day 175/night 




1 123 Broadway, Suite 814 
New York, New York 10010 

www2.infohouse.com/earthvideo 



212-228-4254 



Avid Non-Linear Editing, available in 
both PAL & NTSC for: 
Short Films/Documentaries/ 
Music Videos & Commercials 
Demo Reels 

Post Production 



Video Tape Transfers in all formats , 
including: DV Cam & DVC Pro 

■ International Standards Conversion, 
PAL & SECAM 

1 High Quality Duplication from any 

Source Master 
1 Film to tape Transfer 



ANALOG DIGITAL INTERNATIONAL 

20 East 49th Street, 2nd floor 

New York, NY 10017 

Tel: (21 2) 688-51 1 Fax (212) 688-5405 

E-MAIL address: adidigital@aol.com 



Need legal representation? 

Call Ken Feldman or Abe Michael Shainberg at the 
Feldman Law Firm for 

INDEPENDENT FILM PACKAGING TO FINANCIERS AND DISTRIBUTORS 

AGREEMENTS .CONTRACT REVIEW, LITIGATION , COLLECTION, OR DEFENSE IF SUED. 

«s- Free Consultation Fair Rates «" 



FELDMAM LAW FIRM , 12 East 41 s1 Street, #1302, 212-532-8585, fax: 212-532-8598 
www. feldman-law.com or e-mail us at abems@concentric.net 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 61 



{P@sft jj®slh 


AVID EDITING 


AVR77 & a brain 


$1K / day 


Joshua Schwarz 


Editor 


Tribeca Film Center 


212 965-4632 


www.postjosh.com 



scriptserve, inc 




KEEP YOUR ENTIRE 

SCRIPT ON THE 

INTERNET FOR 

ONE YEAR. 

FOR DETAILS SEE: 
www .scriptserve. com 



INDEPENDENT PRODUCERS MEET LIBRARIANS 
AND CURATORS 

When: Tuesday, February 2 
Where: Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN 
Contact: Corie Zimmerman at Libraries for the 
Future (800) 542-1918 or LaTrice Dixon (212) 
807-1400 x. 236. 

This panel discussion will examine the way inde- 
pendent film- and videomakers use the Internet 
to exhibit and distribute their work, how public 
libraries and museums work together to create 
digital media and information collections, and 
how we can preserve public access to the 
Internet. This is the fourth in the series of 
national Communications Forums on telecom- 
munications policy sponsored by AIVF and 
Libraries for the Future. 

MARCH PREVIEW 

Up Close: 
Conversations with Filmmakers 



Going Digital (in Two Parts) 

Part II: Three Filmmakers Discuss Their 
Recent Work in the Digital Domain 

When: March (date TBA) 

Where: TBA 

Cost: TBA 

To register/get details: (212) 807-1400 x. 301. 

Tickets also at the door. 

Join in on this conversation among accom- 
plished filmmakers who've made digital 
video their medium of choice. Directors and 
key creative personnel will present clips of 
their work and reflect on their creative and 
technical processes, and on their experi- 
ences in the independent realm today. 
Discussion will be moderated by producer 
Esther Robinson. Filmmakers will be 
announced at a later date. 



NFORMATION RESOURCES 



RESOURCE LIBRARY UPDATE 

Check out the new titles on our shelves! 

New reference guides: 

• The New York Production Guide (NYPG) 

The essential aid for your every production 
need — from crewing up and renting equipment 
to securing permits in the New York area. 

• The BIu-Boolc 

The directory to the film and television industry! 
Listings include production and distribution 
companies, effects and post houses, and more. 
Published by The Hollywood Reporter. 

• Hollywood Creative Directory 

Over 1,000 listings of production companies, 
studios, and networks, with selected credits and 
contact information. 

• Hollywood Distributors Directory: The 
Independent Filmmaker's Gateway to Distribution 
2,000 names and titles of sales, acquisitions, pub- 
lic relations, and marketing staffs of domestic dis- 
tributors and foreign sales agents. 

• The Foundation Center's National Guide to 
Funding in Arts & Culture 

A concise directory of grants available to artists 
and arts organizations. 

New books: 

• The Variety Guide to Film Festivals, by Steven 
Gaydos 

• International Film Festival Guide 1998, by Shael 
Stolberg 

• Multimedia Producer's Handbook, by Mark 
Litwak 



• The Complete Film Production Handbook, by 
Eve Light Honthaner 

New subscriptions: 

• Ross Reports (Monthly listings of film and tele- 
visions productions) 

• Back issues of Filmmaker Magazine 

The Resource Library is available to members for 
in-house research Monday through Friday from 
1 1 a.m. to 6 p.m. It is continually being updated 
with books, magazines, and reference guides 
ranging from production and distribution to 
screening events and job listings. 

We are always taking requests of titles you 
would like to see made available. Email or fax 
suggestions to: Michelle Coe, program and infor- 
mation services director, at (212) 463-8519 (fax) 
or michelle(" aivf.org. 

LET AIVF DO THE NETWORKING FOR YOU 

We get an average of 20 walk-ins per week of 
filmmakers looking to crew up or get involved in 
projects. Our resume bank and bulletin boards 
are filled with listings of talented cast and crew 
looking for projects and collaborators. We are 
currently updating our resources, so send us your 
resumes or business cards! 

Likewise, if you are looking to crew up your 
project, mail or fax us your posting. (Please 
include a deadline or announcement date on the 
flyer to help keep our boards current.) Send 
information to the attention of Michelle Coe, 
program and information services director, 



62 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 





^BMUm 






Find information, technical tips, advocacy 

updates, and member gossip, questions & news 

on AIVF'S website: 

• f . 






lis! 




CHECK IT OUT: 
AIVF'S EVER-EXPANDING WEB SITE 

ww.aivf.org is being reborn as the 
quintessential resource for inde- 
pendent film- and videomakers. We 
have expanded and are continuing 
to expand sections to serve our 
membership more thoroughly, 
including Bulletin Boards for 
posting project updates and calls 
for crew; Salon Updates to better 
connect filmmakers nationwide; 
and most of all, our Information 
Databases, which will house con- 
tact information for festivals, dis- 
tributors, cable and broadcast com- 
panies, funders, and exhibitors. Be 
sure to browse the site and keep an 
eye out for upcoming features! 



RESUME BANK c/o AIVF, 304 Hudson St., 6th 
fl., NY, NY 10013. 

FILM BYTES 

Every third Friday of the month at 7 p.m. at 
www.pseudo.com, AIVF hosts FILM BYTES, a 
webcast series about independent media produc- 
tion. Produced by Kinotek & Pseudo Network. 
Check out our website for further details 
[www.aivf.org]. 



NOT RECEIVING YOUR INDEPENDENT! 

If you have any problems receiving The 
Independent or questions regarding your AIVF 
membership, please call LaTrice Dixon or Marya 
Wethers x. 236. 



« film west 

IRELAND'S FILM QUARTERLY 



"Film West is an excellent quarterly: a must for anyone with 
an interest in contemporary Irish cinema" Neil Jordan 

Film West is Ireland's premier film quarterly, covering all 
the issues relating to both national and international film. 
If you are interested in film, and especially film in Ireland, 
then Film West is essential reading. 

PAYMENT TO: 

Film West Magazine, Galway Film Centre, 

Cluain Mhuire, Monivea Road, Galway. Ireland. 

Tel: +353-91-770758 Fax: +353-91-770746. 

e-mail: galfilm@iol.ie web site: http://www.iol.ie/-galtilm 



SUBSCRIPTION DETAILS 

J Europe: 1 year/4 issues: - £18.00 IR 

J USA & others: 1 year/4 issues: - £22.00 IR 

Name: 



Address 



□ I enclose a cheque lor IR£ made payable to Film West 

lJ Please chaige IRE to my Visa/Mastercard 



Card No: 
Expires 



Signature: 



Date: 




40 West 27th Street 
New York, NY 10001 

y "•"■ 

Sound Stage Rentals: 
34 x 28 x 14 

200 Amps 
Hard Cyc / Blue Screen 

$500 / day 

On Line Editing: 

DVCam, BetaSP, 3/4", S-VHS 

ABC Roll 

DVE: Pinnacle Alladin 

w/lots of Effects 

Video Toaster 4. 1 

$85 / hour with Editor 

Production Packages: 
SONY DVCAM: 

DSR-130 $380 /day* 

DSR-300 $280 / day* 

* Including Cameraperson 

Audio Services: 

ADR, voice-over recording 

$55 / hr. 

In-house Sound Design & Scoring 

also available. 

Tel: 212-679-9779 
Fax: 212-532-0444 

7 



Editorial services 

for film and television. 

EDITOR WITH MEDIA 100X1?, 
forage, BetaSP, 3/4", SHVS, 
DAT, CD, Scanner, 
After Effects, Commotion 



Docum entary and feature credits, 

TV commercials, and 

vinning corporate video. 
• 

_ ongratulations to our client 

Roger Summerhayes, whose 



cted for the 1999 
e Film Festival. 



John Slater 



(800) 807-4142 

www.johnslater.com 

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS WELCOME 




^ 



Mini-DV and DVCAM dubs to BETA 

...at prices independent 

filmmakers can afford 



212-765-6600 Lichtenstein Creative Media 

1600 Broadway Suite 601 New York, N.Y. 10019 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 63 



SALONS 




STUDENTS: CALL FOR ENTRIES 

How is POPULATION GROWTH affecting 

CONSUMPTION • ENVIRONMENT • SUSTAINABIUTY 

$10,000 IN PRIZES 

NO ENTRY FEE 

TV EXPOSURE • NATIONAL TOUR 

For more information, a resource guide and 
a copy of the video Best of Festival , contact: 
WPFVF • 46 Fox Hill Road, Bernardston, MA 

01337 • TL: 800 638-9464 • FX: 413 648-9204 

eM: info@wpfvf.com • www.wpfvf.com 

Sponsored by Sopris Foundation, Searchlight 

Films & Population Communications International 



KITCHEN 
CINEMA 




MEDIA nonlinear on-line 



editing suite 



VIII 

at affordable 

rates 

NTSC & PAL Beta SP 

63 gig MicroNet Data Dock 

Jazz Drive - Mackie 1 402 Mixer 

After Effects 

Editors available 



149 5 th AVE • NYC 
212 253 9472 




his is an opportunity tor members to 
discuss work, meet other indepen- 
dents, share war stories, and connect 
with the AIVF community across the 
country. Note: Since our copy dead- 
line is two months before the meet- 
ings listed below, be sure to call the 
local organizers to confirm that there 
have been no last-minute changes. 



Albany, NY: 

When: 1st Wednesday of each month, 6:30 p.m 

Where: Borders Books Cs. Music, 

Wolf Rd. 

Contact: Mike Camoin, (518) 895- 

5269; video4c(5 concentric.com 

Atlanta, GA: 

When: Second Monday of the 
month, 6:30 p.m. 

Where: Redlight Cafe, Amsterdam 
Outlets off of Monroe Dr. 
Contact: Genevieve McGillicuddy, 
IMAGE (404) 352-4225 x. 8 

Austin, TX: 

When: Last Monday of the month, 

8 p.m. 

Where: Electric Lounge, 302 Bowie 

Street 

Contact: Ben Davis, (512) 708- 

1962 



Where: Call for locations. 

Contact: Houston Film Commission Hotline, 

227-1407 



(713) 



Lincoln, NE: 

When: Second Wed. of every month, 5:30 p.m. 
Where: Carlos O'Kelly's, 4455 N. 27th St. 
Contact: (402) 782-2081 

Kansas City, MO: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: John Sjlobom (816) 333-7574 

New Brunswick, NJ: 

When: Last Wednesday of each 
month, call for time. 
Where: Cappuccino's Gourmet 
Cafe, Colonial Village Rte. 27 
& Parsonage Rd., Edison, NJ. 
Contact: Allen Chou (908) 
756-9845 or www.passionriv- 



AIVF IMBED SALON 



to R) The Westchester salon 
co-organizer Jonathan Kaplan, 
director Mary Harron {I Shot Andy 
Warhol), director John Walsh, and 

author/ film critic/moderator 
Marshall Fine meet at Westchester 
Community College to discuss 
lie Making of a Feature Film." 



Birmingham, AL: 

When/Where: Call for date and 
location. 

Contact: Michele Foreman, (205) 298-0685 

Boston, MA: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: Susan Walsh, (508) 528-7279 

Brooklyn, NY: 

When: 4th Tuesday of each month; call for time. 
Where: Ozzie's Coffeehouse, 7th Ave. ck Lincoln PI. 
Contact: Glenn Francis Frontera, (718) 646-7533 

Chicago, IL: 

When/Where: Call for date &. location. 

Contact: Oscar Cervera, (773) 751-8000 x. 2564 

Cleveland, OH: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: Annetta Marion, (216) 781-1755 

Dallas, TX: 

When: 3rd Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. 

Where: Call for locations. 

Contact: Bart Weiss, (214) 999-8999 

Denver/Boulder, CO: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 

Contact: Diane Markrow, (303) 449-7125 or Jon Stout 

(303) 442-8445. 

Palm Beach, FL: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: Dominic Giannetti, (561) 326-2668 

Houston, TX: 

When: Last Tuesday of each month, 7 p.m. 




New Haven, CT: 

When/Where: Call for date 

and location. 

Contact: Jim Gherer, ACES 

Media Arts Center, (203) 782- 

3675 



San Diego, CA: 

When/Where: Call for date 

and location. 

Contact: Paul Espinosa, (619) 

284-9811 

Seattle, WA: 

When/Where: Call for dates 
and locations. 
Contact: Joel Bachar, (206) 282-3592 

Tucson, AZ: 

When/Where: The first Monday of each month from 

6-8pm at Club Congress, 311 E. Congress, in 

Downtown Tucson. 

Contact: Beverly Seckinger, (520) 621-1239, Robert 

Ashle; robertC"access. tucson.org or visit http://ac- 

cess.tucson.org/aivf/ 

Washington, DC: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: DC Salon hotline (202) 554-3263 x. 4 

Westchester, NY: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: Bob Curtis, (914) 741-2538; 
aol.com or Jonathan Kaplan (914) 
jkap3(« juno.com 

Youngstown, OH: 

When/Where: Call for dates and times. 

Contact: Art Byrd, The Flick Clique, 

www.cboss.com/flickclique 

For updates or changes to this listing, contact Marya 
Wethers x. 236 



recll 1(3 
948-3447; 



64 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 




THE ASSOCIATION 



J OF I 

FILMI 



IDEPEN 
AKERS 



Inverse, committed opinionated, and 
fiercely independent— these are the 
video and filmmakers who make up 
the national membership of AIVF. 
Documentary and feature filmmakers, 
animators, experimentalists, distribu- 
tors, educators, students, curators— all 
concerned that their work make a dif- 
ference—find the Association of 
Independent Video and Filmmakers, the 
national service organization for inde- 
pendent media producers, vital to their 
professional lives. Whether it's our 
magazine, The Independent Film <§• 
Video Monthly, or the organization 
raising its collective voice to advocate 
for important issues, AIVF preserves 
your independence while letting you 
know you're not alone. 

To succeed as an independent today, 
you need a wealth of resources, strong 
connections, and the best information 
available. So join with more than 
4,500 other independents who rely on 
AIVF to help them succeed. JOIN AJVF 
TODAY! 

Uete's what AIVF membership 
offers: 



**i independent 

>nrtt _ >ly' 

"We Love This Magazine!!" 
-UTNE Reader- 



L mr-»nrtt-iK 



Membership provides you with a 
year's subscription to The Independent 
Thought-provoking features, news, and 
regular columns on business, technical, 
and legal matters. Plus festival list- 



ings, distributor profiles, funding dead- 
lines, exhibition venues, and announce- 
ments of member activities and new 
programs and services. Special issues 
highlight regional activity and focus 
on subjects including experimental 
media, new technologies, and media 
education 

WORKSHOPS, PANELS, AND 
SEMINARS 

Members get discounts on events cov- 
ering the whole spectrum of current 
issues and concerns affecting the field, 
ranging from business and aesthetic to 
technical and political topics. 

INSURANCE 

Members are eligible to purchase dis- 
counted personal and production 
insurance plans through AIVF suppli- 
ers. A wide range of health insurance 
options is available, as well as E&O 
and production plans tailored to the 
needs of low-budget mediamakers. 

TRADE DISCOUNTS 

More than SO businesses across the 
country offer AIVF members discounts 
on equipment and auto rentals, film 
processing, transfers, editing, and 
other production necessities. Plus 
long-distance and overnight courier 
services are available at special rates 
for AIVF members from national com- 
panies. Members also receive discounts 
on hotels and car rentals. 

INFORMATION 

We distribute a series of informational 
resources on financing, funding, distri- 
bution, and production; members 



receive discounts on selected titles. 
AIVF's staff can also provide informa- 
tion about distributors, festivals, and 
general information pertinent to your 
needs. With over 600 volumes, our 
library houses information on every- 
thing from distributors to sample con- 
tracts to budgets. We're working on a 
comprehensive information system 
that will be available on-line only to 
members. 

COMMUNITY 

Monthly member get-togethers called 
AIVF Salons, occur in cities across the 
country. These member-run, member- 
organized salons are a unique opportu- 
nity for members and non-members 
alike to network exhibit, and advocate 
for independent media in their local 
area. To find the salon nearest you 
check the back pages of The 
Independent, the ATVF website 
[www.aivf.orgl, or ca U the office for 
the one nearest you. If you can't find 
one in your area then start one! 

CONFERENCE/SCREENING 
ROOM 

Members can have access to our low- 
cost facility to hold meetings and 
small private screenings of work for 
friends, distributors, programmers, flin- 
ders, and producers. 

ADVOCACY 

AIVF continues its efforts to advocate 
for the field, holding forums around 
the country to keep independent 
mediamakers abreast of the latest 
issues concerning our community. 



MEMBERSHIP CATEGORIES 

INPIVIPUAL/STUPENT MEMBERSHIP 

Includes: One year's subscription to The Independent Access to all insurance plans and discounts _ 
On-line or Over-the-Phone Information Services _ Discounted admission to seminars _ Book discounts 
_ Advocacy action alerts _ Eligibility to vote and run for board of directors. 

SUPPORTING MEMBERSHIP 

All of the above benefits extended to two members of the same household except for the year's sub- 
scription to The Independent which is shared by both 

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONAL/BUSINESS & INDUSTRY MEMBERSHIP 

All the above benefits (except access to insurance plans) and 3 one-year subscriptions to The 
Independent _ Representative may vote and run for board of directors _ Special mention in The 
Independent 

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION 

Year's subscription to The Independent only JOIN AJVF TOPAY! 



MEMBERSHIP RATES 

$3S/Student (enclose copy of student ID) 
$SS/Individual 
$9B/Supporting 
$100/Non-profit Organization 
$1B0/Business 8t Industry 
LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION 
$75 domestic 
$90 foreign 

Name 

Organization 

Address 

City 

State 



ZIP 



Country 

Weekday teL 
Fax 



Email: 



URL: 



MAILING RATES 

U.S. - magazines are mailed second-class; 
add $20 for first-class mailing. 
Canada - add $15 
Mexico - add $20 
All Others - Add $45 



Membership cost 

Mailing Costs (if applicable) 

ContHkutiOn tO FIVF (make separate tax deductible check payable t 

Total amount enclosed (check or money order) 
Or please bill my Visa MC 



Acct # 



Exp. date I 



I 



Signature 



Mail to AIVF, 304 Hudson St, 6th Floor, NY, NY 10013; Or charge by phone (212) 207-1400 x236, by fax (212) 

463-5519, or download from our website www.aivf.org 



E DISCOUNTS 



Discounts are available to current AIVF members with card. 



ARIZONA 



FX Factory 

Tucson, AZ ; (520)623-3175; FXFactory@aol.com 
Special effects production studio specializing in film 
effects, prosthetics & makeup effects for film, TV & the- 
ater. AIVF members receive 15% to 30% discount on 
labor. 

CALIFORNIA 

Aries Post 

1680 Vine St., Ste. 216, Hollywood, CA 90028; (213) 463- 
6296; ariespost@aol.com; Contact: Kevin Glover 
10% discount off rate card for all video postproduction 
services incL Beta SP, Hi8, 3/4", SVHS & DVC to Beta SP 
analog A/B editing & Avid non-linear suite. 

Mill Valley Film Group 

104 Eucalyptus Knoll, Mill Valley, CA 94941; (415) 381- 
9309; fax: 389-9110; MVFG@aol.com 
Contact: Will Parrinello 

Independent doc producers, established & award-win- 
ning provide free consultation when you rent from us wl 
35% discounts on Media 100SX, Media lOONubus, Avid 
400s, VHS cuts only system & Beta SP production pack- 
age. 

Studio Film and Tape 

1215 N Highland Ave, Hollywood, CA 90038; (800) 824- 
3130; fax: (213) 463-2121; SFTSERVICE@SPTWEB.COM; 
Contact: Richard Kaufman 

10% discount on new Fuji 16 mm film, llford 16mm b&w 
film, Maxwell videotape in all formats, all editorial sup- 
plies mcl. leader, mag stock, splicing tape & computer 
data storage media. 

Virgin Moon Post 

56 E. Main St., Ste. 207, Ventura, CA 93001; (805) 652- 
6890; fax: 652-6899; Contact: Ken Finning 
10%, discount on all postproduction services: Media 
100XS, Betacam SP, Adobe After Effects. Adobe 
Photoshop, Boris Effects, online/offline, Fresh Music 
Library, DLT Back-up, Quick Time. 

COLORADO 

MovieMaker 

4730 Table Mesa Dr, Ste. B-100, Boulder, CO 80303; (303) 

449-6300; fax: 499-7245 

Contact: Susan Lyle Kinney 

15% discount on video production services mcl. shooting 

editing script consultation. 

WASHINGTON D.C. 

Yellow Cat Productions 

505 11th St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003; (202) 543-2221; 

fax: 543-2287; yellowcat@yellowcat.com; Contact: Mary 

Flannery 

15% off a full day video shoot wl a 2 person crew-, 15% 

off any Avid editing in charming townhouse on Capitol Hill. 

FLORIDA 

Film Friends 

729 NE 71st St., Miami, FL 33138; (305) 757-9038; fax: 

757-9795; mikcamera@earthlink.net 

Contact: Mik Cribben 

20% discount on extensive range of equipment rentals-. 

camera, video, lighting, sound, grip & Steadicam. 

ILLINOIS 



Cybertech Media 

26 W 482 Blair, Winfield, IL 60190 ; (630) 690-7611; fax: 
690-2143; MEDIA@CYBERTECHMEDIA.COM; www.cyber 
techmedia.com/aivf.html; Contact: Larry Spiegel 
10% discount on all videotape conversions to streaming 
video formats such as Real Video, NetShow, or Vivo for use 
on the Internet, or Quicktime &AVI formats for use on CD- 
ROM. 

Studio Film and Tape 

10 W. Kinzie St., Chicago, IL 60610; (800) 467-0070; fax: 

(312) 467-0074; SFTchi@Ameritech.net 

Contact: Max Good 

10% discount on new Fuji film & llford B/W film. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Northeast Negative Matchers, Inc. 

25 Riverview Terrace, Springfield, MA 01108; (413) 736- 

2177; fax: 734-1211; nenm@nenm.com 

Contact: Ins Girard 

10% minimum discount on negative cutting services on 

any format. FREE use of 16mm or 35mm 8- plate 

Steenbeck editing suites. Call for details. 

MARYLAND 

The Sync-online network 

4431 Lehigh Rd, College Park, MD 20746; (301) 806-7812; 
fax: 474-5192; info@the sync.com 
Contact: Carla Cole 

10% discount on live & on-demand internet video encod- 
ing. We can put up a trailer or an entirety of a film work. 

NEW JERSEY 

Ren Media 

2011 St. George Ave, Rahway, NJ 07065; (908) 382-5329; 

Contact: Ruth Kennedy 

Discounts on music scoring for film/video. 

NEW YORK 

Bee Harris Productions 

79 Putnam St., Mt. Vernon, NY 10550; (800) 811-2240; 
fax: (800) 988-3939; BeeHarnsl@aol.com 
Contact: Robert Bruzio 

10% discount on all editing services & facilities (Avid, 
Beta SP 3/4", 16mm, 35mm, transfers, duplications). 
Producers of films, commercials, docs, corporate & edu- 
cational videos. 

Diva Edit 

330 W. 42nd St., Ste. 1510, 15th FL, New York, NY 10036; 
(212) 947-8433; Contact: Robert Richter 
10% discount on all editing services & facilities: Avid 
1000 & Avid 800 wl Film Composer. 

Downtown Community TV Center 

87 Lafayette St., New York, NY 10013; (212) 966-4510; 
fax: 219-0248; web@dctvny.org; Contact: Paul Pittman 
10-20% discount on DCTV video workshops & seminars; 
low-fee Avid & DVC camera rental for nonprofit projects. 

DV8Video, Inc. 

738 Broadway, New York, NY 10003; (212) 529-8204; fax: 

982-5593; lnbox@DV8designs.com 

Contact: Morgan Reese 

10% discount on all Avid editing services & duplication, 

Beta SP Digital Betacam, DVCPRO, 314", Hi8& VHS. 



ince 1988 



\A 



SOUND DESIGN 



OMPOSITIN 



CGI 



12.691. 103 



WWW. GL C. COM 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 65 



Media 100 Suites 

(with or without editor) 

beta sp - 3/4" - Hi8 - VHS - 5VHS 

2d/3d Graphics Design 

photoshop, illustrator, 
after effects, electricimage 

Voice-over Booth 
Internet and CD-ROM 

integration of your video projects 
into web pages and cd-rom. 



Medialuna 
Productions 



636 broadway, suite 214 

tel. 212.228.1133 

fax 212.228.1101 

www.medialuna.com 



WHEN IT COMES TO 

ENTERTAINMENT i 
MEDIA INSURANCE 



WE ARE 
THE EXPERTS! 




DeWITT STERN 
GROUP, INC. 

NEW YORK 

420 LEXINGTON AVENUE 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 10170-0199 

TEL: (212) 867-3550 • FAX: (212) 983-6483 

JOLYON F. STERN, President 
CAROL A. BRESSI-CILONA, SR. Vice Pres. 



AFFILIATES IN: LONDON • PARIS • MUNICH 



JUST SOLUTIONS 

An i8 1 /2-hour television series 

of independently produced 

documentaries about 

domestic and international 

human rights abuses and the 

communities fighting to 

address them. Airing on Free 

Speech TV and public 

television stations. y;m^^^- 

A PIG'S TALE — US intervention in Haiti^^ 

leads to poverty and, ultimately, revolution." 
DIRTY SECRETS— A US lawyer exposes CIA 

abuses while searching for her missing rebel husband in Guatemala. 
POVERTY OUTLAW— Organized "welfare mothers" fight for economic justice 

on the streets of Philadelphia. 
THE LAST GRADUATION — College programs in prisons are being cut as the prison 

industry thrives. 



Please call your PBS station to receive local listings 
for these four JUST SOLUTIONS programs^ 

For the complete cable line-up and a free |UST SOLUTIONS Human Rights ■ -cjl___ 
■*■ Advocacy Kit call toll free 1-888-550-FSTV or visit www.freespeech.org/fstv <jH> 

""" - Dacl ation 

"P ( ^)krdi r.rr.:r 



Echo Communications Group, Inc. 

179 Franklin St., 4th Fl., New York, NY 10013; (212) 292- 

0900; fax: 292-0909; accounts@echonyc.com; jchu@ 

echonyc.com; www.echonyc.com 

Contact: Josh Chu 

25% discount on all Echo conference & SLIP/PPP 

accounts. Up to 25% off commercial & non-profit web 

hosting packages. 

Film Friends 

16 E. 17th St., 8th FL, New York, NY 10003; (212) 620- 
0084; Contact: Jay Whang 

20% discount on extensive range of equipment rentals: 
camera, video, lighting sound, grip & Steadicam. 

GLC Productions 

11 Weehawken St., New York, NY 10014; (212) 691-1038; 
fax: 242-4911; stacy@glc.com; Contact: Stacy Davidoff 
10-30% discount off book rate for audio postproduction 
services. ADR, sound design, SFX/ Foley, mix, ISDN phone 
patch. 

Image Design Studio 

16 W. 32nd St., Ste. 807, New York, NY 10001; (212) 643- 

4283; fax: 346-9255; Lee@IMAGEDS.com 

Contact: Michael Lee 

25-30% discount on videobox design, graphic design, 

websites, logos, ad design & desktop publishing. 

Island Media International 

22 Prince St. #110, New York, NY 10012; (212) 252-3522 
50% discount off all corporate rates on Avid editing ser- 
vices: Avid, Betacam SP, DV cam-digital, film to tape & 
tape to film transfers, camera packages. 

Lichtenstein Creative Media 

1600 Broadway, Ste. 601, New York, NY 10019; (212) 765- 
6600; fax: 765-6550; lcm@lcmedia.com Contact: June 
Peoples 

15/o discount on mmi-DV & DVcam dubs to Beta & equip- 
ment rental. 

Moondance Productions 

630 9th Ave, Ste. 1212, New York, NY 10036; (212) 315- 
2000; fax: 586-1572 
Contact: Bob Schapir or Eileen Conlon 
10-30% discount (depending on hrs) on all editing ser- 
vices: Avid, AVR-77, Media Log. All formants: Beta SP DVC 
Pro, DV cam, 3/4," VHS, D-7, Hi8. 

NTV Studio Productions 

50 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, NY 10020; (212) 489-8390; 
fax: 603-4820; entv@aol.com 
Contact: Elyse Rabinowitz 

10%, discount on all editing services. Our edit suite 
includes: Sony BVE 2000 Editor, DVS 2000C Switcher, DME 
3000 Multi Effects unit, MXP 2016 Mixing Console & 
Chyron Max! The switcher allows for digital editing wl Beta 
or Beta SP source tapes. 

One Art 

132 W. 21st St., New York, NY 10011; (212) 741-9155; fax: 
675-5061; 0neArtFilm@aol.com 
Contact: Valerie Kontakos 
10% discount on Avid rentals. 

Open Studios 

601 Gates Rd.Vestal, NY 13850; (607) 729-0100 x. 356; 

fax: 729-7328; eter_Bombar@WSKG.PBS.ORG 

Contact: Peter Bombar 

10-40% off digital audio /video editing production & field 

shooting. (Includes audio postproduction, music, SFX, 

sound design, surround sound automated mixing, full 

video services wl Betacam & D3 etc). 



S6 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



Pharoah Editorial, Inc 

35 W. 44th St., 2nd Fl„ New York, NY 10036; (212) 398- 
7676; tax: 398-1314; Contact: Peter or Richard 
10-15% discount on audio services & mixing, editing, 
sound design, custom music & labor on ADR & foley. 
(Excludes stock, website downloads & audio-plus-picture 
packages). 

Picture This Music 

50 W. 34th St., Ste. 9C, New York, NY 10001; (212) 947- 
6107; Contact: Paul D. Goldman 
10-30% off digital audio postproduction: music, 
voiceovers, sound design, SFX, audio mixing (ProTools 
work stations). 

PrimaLux Video 

30 W. 26th St., New York, NY 10010; (212) 206-1402 
Contact: Judy Cashman 

10% or more discounts (nonprofits encouraged) on ser- 
vices mcl.: studio production facilities, remote production 
packages & postproduction. 

Quark Video 

109 W. 27th St., New York, NY 10001; (212) 807-7711; fax: 
807-7016; Contact: Michael Levin 
10% discount for all postproduction services, mcl. 3/4", 
3/4" SP, S-VHS, VHS, Betacam, Beta SP A/B Roll editing to 
3/4" SP, Betacam SP or one inch. Also 10% discount for 
all duplication orders over $25. 

Rafik 

814 Broadway, New York, NY 10003; (212) 475-7884; fax: 
475-8411; Contact: Sales 

25% discounts on used cassettes over $100, 10% on sin- 
gle invoices over $100 for video services, editing duplica- 
tion, film-to-tape transfers & foreign video conversion. 

Soho Audio 

376 Broome St., New York, NY 10013; (212) 226-2429; fax: 

966-7650 sohoaud@mcimail.com 

Contact: Larry Loewinger 

10% discount on all daily rentals. Deeper discounts on 

longer term rentals. 

Sound Dimensions Editorial 

321 W. 44th St., Rm. 500, New York, NY 10036; (212) 757- 
5147; Contact: Bernie 

15% discounts on transfers, effects & sound studio ser- 
vices: foley, ADR, narration, mixing. 

Splash Studios 

168 5th Ave, 5th fl. North, New York, NY 10010; (212) 271- 

8747; fax: 271-8748; BPLPR0D@A0L.com Contact: Peter 

Levin 

35% on hrly editing fees. Services include: dialog & sound 

effects editing, ADR & Foley editing & recording, music 

editing & transfers. This discount does not apply to media. 

Star Tech 

152 W. 72nd St., Ste. 2R, New York, NY 10023; (212) 362- 
5338; fax: 724-2980; Contact: John Hampton 
Discounts on paging equipment & services, all sound 
equipment, modification & repair. 

Studio Film and Tape 

630 9th Ave, New York, NY 10036; (800) 444-9330; fax: 
(212) 586-2420; Contact: Rudy Benda 
5% discount on film stock & all videotape stock avail, in 
new & Ecotape. 

Terra Firma Media 

309 E. 4th St. #2A, New York, NY 10009; (212) 477-0688; 
fax: 477-0688; lmontalvo@aol.com 
Contact: lleana Montalvo 



southern Illinois uniuersity carbondale 



film rest in a I 

FfflRlM) 26 - mflRCH 7 



C Fi 



OR 



EN T R I E S 



e n t r&*m®mmW-\ne is ja niiary 1 6 „ 1 Q Q Q 



=== souThem Illinois uniuersity carbondale 

^Zw I dept. of cinema 6 photography 618. 453. 1482 

*— 'IV; maitcoda6610 fax: 618.453 2264 

Carbondale carbondala 162901 httpV/ujiuuj. siu.edu/~films 




long & short form nonlinear editing 

online/offline, motion graphics, film 



affordable 

rates for 

independents! 



65 st. marks place, suite 16, nyc 10003 David Chmura, editor 



T^--^.^,, -** FILM & VIDEO 
JUGuQLLJ- 212-228-1914 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 67 



Statement of Ownership 
Management and Circulation 

(Required by 39 U.S.C. 3685) 

! . Tide of Publication: 77k.' Independent Film & Video Mom/irv. 

2. Publication number: 011-708. 

3 Filing date: 12-2-98. 

4- Issue frequency: Monthly (except Feb. & Sept.). 

5. Number of issues published annually: 10. 

6. Annual subscription price: $35/studenf, $55/individual; 
$75/1ibrary; JlOO/nonprofit organization; $ 1 50/business & 
industry. 

7- Complete mailing address of known office of publication: 
304 Hudson St., 6th fl., New York, NY 10013-1015. Contact 
person: Paul Power. Telephone: (212) 807-1400 x. 226. 

8. Complete mailing address of headquarters or general busi- 
ness office of publisher: 304 Hudson St., 6th fl., New York, 
NY 10013-1015. 

9. Full names and complete mailing addresses of the publish- 
er, editor, and managing editor: Publisher: Ruby Lemer, 304 
Hudson St., 6th fl., New York, NY 10013-1015. Editor: 
Patricia Thomson, 304 Hudson St., 6th fl., New York, NY 
10013-1015. Managing Editor: Paul Power, 304 Hudson St., 
6th fl., New York, NY 10013-1015. 

10. Owner: The Foundation (or Independent Video and Film 
(FIVF), 304 Hudson St., 6th fl., New York, NY 10013-1015. 
(FIVF is a nonprofit organization.) 

1 1. Known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security 
holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of total amount 
of bonds, mortgages, or other securities: None. 

12. Tax status: The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of 
this organization and the exempt status for federal income 
tax purposes has not changed during the preceding 12 
months. 

1 3. Publicanon tide: TJie lndcpa\dem Fibn & X'uleii Mutu/ih. 

14. Issue date for circulation data below: Jan/Feb 1999. 

15. Extent and nature of circulation: a. Total No. Copies (net 
press run): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 
months: 12,830; actual no. copies ot single issue published 
nearest to tiling date: 12,200. b. Paid and/or requested circu- 
lation: (1) Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, 
and counter sales [not miuled): Average no. copies each issue 
during preceding 12 months: 6,587; actual no. copies of sin- 
gle issue published nearest to filing date: 6,845; (2) Paid or 
requested mail subscriptions. Average no. copies each issue 
during preceding 12 months: 4,600; actual no. copies ot sin- 
gle issue published nearest to tiling date: 4,547. c. Total paid 
and/or requested circulation: Average no. copies each issue 
during preceding 12 months: 11,187; actual no. copies of sin- 
gle issue published nearest to filing date: 1 1,392. d. Free dis- 
tribution by mail: Average no. copies each issue during pre- 
ceding 12 months: 680; actual no. copies of single issue pub- 
lished nearest to tiling date: 0. e. Free distribution outside the 
mail (carriers or other means): Average no. copies each issue 
during preceding 12 months: 200; actual no. copies of single 
issue published nearest to tiling date: 300. f. Total free distrib- 
ution: Average no. copies each issue during preceding 1 2 
months: 880; actual no. copies of single issue published near- 
est to tiling date: 300. g. Copies not distributed: (1) Office 
use, leftovers, spoiled: Average no. copies each issue during 
preceding 12 months: 754; actual no. copies of single issue 
published nearest to filing date: 508. (2) Returns from 
newsagents: Average no. copies each issue during preceding 
12 months: 9; actual no. copies of single issue published near- 
est to tiling date: Not available, h. Total: (sum of 15 g. h(l) 
and h(2) Average no. copies each issue dunng preceding 12 
months: 12,830; actual no. copies ot single issue published 
nearest to filing date: 12,200. 

Percent paid and/or requested circulation: Average no. copies 
each issue dunng preceding 12 months: 94-27%; actual no. 
copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: 97.43%. 

16. Publication of Statement of Ownership: Publication 
required. Will be published in the Jan/Feb 1999 issue of this 
publication. 

17. I certify that the statements made by me above are cor- 
rect and complete. 

(Signed) 

Paul Power, Managing Editor. December 2nd 1998. 



68 THE INDEPENDENT January/February 1999 



FILM VIDEO ARTS 



The Stomping Ground for 
Independent Giants! 

since 1968 



Courses 
Camera Rentals 

Avid 1000 

Digital Studio 

Video Edit Suites 

Flatbeds 

Dubs & Transfers 

Affordable Rates 




212.673.9361 

817 Broadway NYC 



TRULY MODERN 



W 



! ° '|4O0J 



V 



5F\ 



• AATON XTRprod SUPER 16/16mm 

• ARRI SR2 16mm 

• SONY DVW-700 DIGITAL BETACAM 
WITH FILM-STYLE ACCESSORIES 

• SONY BVW-D600 BETACAM SP 

• STEADICAM PRO 

• 1 & 3-TON GRIP & LIGHTING / HMI'S 

• FIELD AUDIO FOR FILM & VIDEO 

• INDIE FRIENDLY-LOW WEEKLY RATES 



MODERN M9UIE 

MACHINE! 



QUALITY PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT RENTALS 

281-561-7200 

888-569-7200 

mmm@insync.net 

www.modernmovie.com 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Provides foreign language services for motion pictures & 
interactive media. 10% discount on translations, 
voiceovers & on location interpreters. 

The Post Office at Filmmaker's Collaborative 

29 Greene St., New York, NY 10013 (212) 966-3030 x. 244; 
fax: 965-0812; Contact: Jonathan Berman 
20-35% off rates for Avid Media Composer offline Edit-ing 
& Digital Camera Rental. 

Tiny Lights, Inc 

286 Spring St. #404, New York, NY 10013; (212)691- 
3358; fax: 691-3548; dance@tinylights.com 
Contact: Michael Momm 

Music & sound design studio offering 15% discount on all 
services. Digidesign protools, SonyLynx video lock com- 
plete music & audio post packages-will work w I your bud- 
get. 

Video Decks To Go 

45 W. 85th St reet #4D, New York, NY 10024; (212)362- 
1056; DFUH @AOL.com ; Contact: David Fuhrer 
10% discount on first time Beta SP deck rentals of one 
week or more. 

Video Active Productions 

353 W 48th St., 2nd fl., New York, NY 10036; (212) 541- 
6592; fax: 541-8139; Vworks@aol.com 
Contact: Steven Garrin 

15-30% discount (depending on hrs, length of booking) 
on all editing sue & facilities Media 100XS, After EFX, 
Boris EFX, Photoshop, Scanner, Beta SP 3/4", Hi 8, DV, 
SVHS, Sonic Solutions Digital Audio, recording studio, 
voiceover casting. 

Virtual Media 

12 E. 44th St., 2nd fl., New York, NY 10017; (212) 490- 
9730; fax: 818-0529; Contact: Heather Gibbons 
Ask about our special discounts for AIVF members. 
Products include the full line of Avid editing systems. 

TEXAS 

R.W. Productions 

Houston, TX; (713) 522-4701; fax: 522-0426 
Contact: Ken Herbert 

10-25% discounts off the standard price of D-Vision (off 
line), Media-100 (on line), Beta SP camera package, 
16mm Arri-BLs. 

Texcam 

3263 Brenard Ave, Houston, TX 77098; (713) 524-2774; 

fax: 524-2779; texcam@iapc.net 

Up to 15% discount on film camera packages (16mm & 

35mm). 

VERMONT 

Edgewood Motion Picture and Video 

162 N. Main St., Rutland, VT 05701; (802) 773-0510; 
pbeckwl968@aol.com; Contact: David Giancola 
25% off production (Beta SP 3/4," Am 16mm & 35mm), 
editing (Avid Media Composer 1000, Betacam SP/ 3/4" 
online) & audio mix (digital audio facilities). 



The Foundation for Independent Video and Film (FTVF), the educational affiliate of the Association for 
Independent Video mid Filmmakers (ATVF), supports a variety of programs and services for the inde- 
pendent media community, including publication of Tlu.' 
hvkpaviau, operation of the Festival Bureau, seminars 



JPMVr- -X"H^V3XT*C«SS 



and workshops, and an information clearing house. None of this work would be possible without die 
generous support of the ATVF membership and die following organizations: 

The Center for Arts Criticism, Consolidated Edison Gimpany of New York, John D. and Catherine T 
MacArthur Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, National Video Resources, New York City Department 
of Cultural Affairs, New York Community Trust, New York State Council on the Arts, Rockefeller Foundation, and 
Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. 

We also wish to diank die following individuals and organizational members: 

Benefactors: Patrons: Sponsors: 

Irwin W Young Mary D. Dorman Ralph Arlyck, Coulter & Sands, Inc., David W Haas, 

Jeffrey Levy-Hinte Julio Riberio, Robert L. Seigel, George C. Stoney 

Business/Industry Members: Avid Technology, Tewksbury, MA; Blackside Inc., Boston, MA; Burnt Mountain 
Films, Batesville, VA; CA. Productions, New York, NY; Creative Image Enterprises, Miami, FL; Fallon McEUigott, 
Minneapolis, MN; Films Transit, Montreal, Quebec; Douglas German, Rothacken, New York, NY; Greenwood/Cooper 
Home Video, Los Angeles, CA; KC Productions, Inc., Aiken, SC; KJM3 Entertainment Group, New York, NY; Loose 
Moon Productions, New York, NY; Joseph W McCarthy, Bnxiklyn, NY; Barbara Roberts, New York, NY; Sandbank 
Films, Hawthorne, NY; Robert L. Seigel, Esq., New York, NY; Telluride Film Festival, Telluride, CO; Tribune Pictures, 
New York, NY; Paul Van Der Grift, Princeton, NJ; Video Utah!, Salt Lake City, UT Washington Square Films, New 
York, NY; TV 1 7, Madison, AL; Westend Films, New York, NY; White Night Productions, San Diego, CA; WNET/1 3, 
NY, NY; 

Nonprofit Members: Access Media Art Center, New Haven, CT ACS Network Productions, Washington, DC; 
Alternate Current, New York, NY; American Civil Liberties Union, New York, NY; American Film Institute, Los 
Angeles, CA; Ann Arbor Community Access TV Ann Arbor, MI; Ann Arbor Film Festival, Ann Arbor, MI; 
Appalshop, Whitesburg, KY; John Armstrong, Brooklyn, NY; The Asia Society, New York, NY; Assemblage, New York, 
NY; Athens Center tor Film & Video, Athens, OH; AVFN International, Inc., Anchorage, AK; Bennu Productions, 
Yonkers, NY; Benton Foundation, Washington, DC; Black Planet Productions, New York, NY; Blackside, Inc., Boston, 
MA; Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, PA; Carved Image Productions, New York, NY; Center for Investigative Reporting, 
San Francisco, CA; Center for New Media, New York, NY; Chicago Video Project, Chicago, IL; Cituma LTDA Film 
and Video Productions, Bogota, Gilumbia; Coe Film Associates, New York, NY; Colelli Productions, QJumbus, OH; 
Columbia GiUege, Chicago, IL; Columbus Community Cable Acess, Qilumbus, OH; Command Gimmunications, Rye 
Brook, NY; Common Voice Films, New York, NY; MHCC Communication Arts, Gresham, OR; Community Television 
Network, Chicago, IL; Denver Film Society, Denver, CO; State University of New York-Buffalo, Buffalo, NY; Dyke TV 
New York, NY; Eclipse Communications, Springfield, MA; Edison-Black Maria Film Festival, Jersey City, NJ; 
Educational Video Center, New York, NY; Edwards Films, Eagle Bridge, NY; Eximus Gimpany, Fort Lauderdale, FL; 
Fallout Shelter Productions, Mansfield, OH; The Film Crew, W(xxlland Hills, CA; Fox Chapel High School, Pittsburgh, 
PA; Great Lakes Film and Video, Milwaukee, WI; Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID; Image Film Video Center, 
Atlanta, GA; International Cultural Programming, New York, NY; International Audiochrome, Rye, NY; International 
Film Seminars, New York, NY; 1TVS, St. Paul, MN; The Jewish Museum, New York, NY; Komplex Studio Merdeka, 
Selangor, Malaysia; KPBS, San Diego, CA; Little City Foundation/Media Arts, Palatine, IL; Long Beach Museum of 
Art, Long Beach, CA; Manhattan Neighboriuxxl Network, New York, NY; Media Resource Centre, Adelaide, 
Australia; Mesilla Valley Film Society, Mesilla, NM; Milestone Entertainment, Irving, TX; Miranda Smith Productions, 
Boulder, CO; Missoula Community Access, Missoula MT NAATA, San Francisco, CA; NAMAC, Oakland, CA; 
National Latino Qimmunity Cente/KCET Los Aigeles, CA; National Center for Film & Video Preservation, Los 
Angeles, CA; National Video Resources, New York, NY; Neighborhood Film/Video Project, Philadelphia, PA; Neon, 
Inc., New York, NY; New Image Productions, Las Vegas, NV; New Liberty Productions, Philadelphia, PA; New York 
Institute of Technology, Old Westbury, NY; 91 1 Media Arts Center, Seattle, WA; Ohio Arts Council, Qilumbus, OH; 
One Eighty One Productions, New York, NY; Outside in July, New York, NY; Paul Robeson Fund/Funding Exchange, 
New York, NY; Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Pittsburgh Filmmakers, Pittsburgh, PA; Pro 
Videographers, Morton Grove, IL; Promontory Point Films, Albany, NY; Rainy States Film Festival, Seattle, WA; 
Medina Rich, New York, NY; Ross Film Theater, Lincoln, NE; Ross-Gafney, New York, NY; San Francisco Art Institute, 
San Francisco, CA; School of the Art Institute, Chicago, IL; Scribe Video Center, Philadelphia, PA; Southwest Alternate 
Media Project, Houston, TX; Squeaky Wheel, Buffalo, NY; Strato Films, Hollywood, CA; Sundance Institute, Los 
Angeles, CA; SUNY/Buffalo-Dept. Media Studies, Buffalo, NY; Swiss Institute, New York, NY; Terrace Films, Brooklyn, 
NY; Trinity Square Video, Toronto, Ontario; Tucson Community Cable Corp., Tucson, AZ; UCLA Film and Television 
Archive, Los Angeles, CA; University of Southern Florida, Tampa, FL; University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; University 
of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI; UMAB/School of Social Work Media Center, Baltimore, MD; University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 
Lincoln, NE; University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; Vancouver Film School, Vancouver, British Columbia; Veritas 
International, Elsah, IL; Video Data Bank, Chicago, IL; Video Pool, Winnipeg, Manitoba; View Video, New York, NY; 
West Hollywood Public Access, West Hollywood, CA; Wexner Center, Gilumbus, OH; Women Make Movies, New 
York, NY; WTTW/Chicago, Chicago, IL; York University Libraries, North York, Ontario; Zeitgeist Film, NY, NY. ■ 



Finding Stock Footage 



that will inspire your 
concepting and jump start 
your imagination 



takes Energy. 



the Largest ,w Most Unique 

Collection ^/Original Cinematography 

m the World. 



FILM -LIBRARY 



1.800 JMAGERY/or Your Most Valuable Resource 
http://www.digital-energy.eom 




Everything 
included. 

Avid Media 

Composer Off-line 

at rates the artist 

can afford. 



kitchen 



Y N 



225 Lafayette, suite 1113, Soho 
Tel: (516) 810-7238 • Fax (516) 421-6923 



January/February 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 69 



M5£i*o 




Digital Media Arts Center 

audio & video 
post-production 

protools 4 / media 100 /after effects 

1 6 - track lock to betacam sp & 3/4 

voice over & adr/sound effects 

video capture & compression 

original music/sound design 

special rates for independents 

Harvestworks Digital Media Arts Center 

2 12.431.1130 x I 

596 Broadway, Suite 602, NYC 10012 

http://www.harvestworks.org 



ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 

MEDIA ARTS PRODUCTION, 
TENURE TRACK 

Growing department seeks qualified 
instructor to teach undergraduate 
and graduate courses in digital post- 
production for picture and sound. 
Candidate must have strong produc- 
tion credentials with a specialization 
in editing picture and sound in the 
digital realm. Must also have a 
strong foundation in the history and 
theory of motion picture editing and 
story structure for fiction and non-fic- 
tion genres. Expertise in film editing 
and linear video editing are desir- 
able. A Master's degree and mini- 
mum of 10 years experience as an 
editor are required as well as some 
college-level teaching experience. 

In addition to teaching, duties include 
curriculum development, departmen- 
tal administration, thesis advisement 
and committee work. 

Send Curriculum Vitae and cover let- 
ter outlining unique qualifications, by 
March 12th, 1999, to: Chair-Search 
Committee, Dept CFV. 



THE CITY COLLEGE OF NEW YORK 
Shepard Hall, Rm 463 
140th St ©Convent Ave. 
New York, NY 10031 

An EO/AA Employer M/F/D/V 





guerrilla kids presents 



NEWYORK INTER! 



CHILDREN', 



FESTIVAL 

New, unusual, compelling 
film and video for children 
ages 5-16. 



FEBRUARY 

4-7, 1999 

for schedule and information 
call 212-677-6478 



Millennium Campaign Fund 

The Millennium Campaign Fund is a 3-year initi- 
tiative to develop a $150,000 cash reserve fund 
for the Foundation for Independent Video and Film 
by the year 2000. Since its inauguration in 
March 1997, we have raised more than $90,000. 
We would like to thank those who have so gen- 
erously donated to the Millennium Campaign 
Fund. (Gifts received as of 10/18/98.) 

Corporations/Government/ 
Foundations 

American Film Institute Theater; John Kennedy Center 
for the Performing Arts; BET/Encore; District 
Cablevision; DC Commission on the Arts 6k Human- 
ities; Home Box Office; Jewish Communal Fund; New 
York State Council on the Arts; Tower Records/Video/ 
Books; US Airways; Washington DC Film Society 

Honorary Committee Members 

(Gifts of $500 or more) 

AIVF DC Salon, Ralph Arlyck, John Bard 
Manulis, Peter Buck, C-Hundred Film Corp., C6kS 
Int'l Insurance Brokers, Hugo Cassirer, Martha 
Coolidge, Detour Film Foundation/Rick Linklater, 
Nik Ives, Bill Jersey, Richard Kylberg, Tom LeGoff, 
Helaine 6k Sidney Lerner, Diane Markrow, 
Leonard Merrill Kurz, Sheila Nevins, David 6k 
Sandy Picker, R.E.M./Athens, LLC, Barbara 
Roberts, James Schamus, Robert L. Seigel, Michael 
Stipe, Liza Vann Smith, Miranda Smith, Ann 
Tennenbaum, Walterry Insurance Company, Marc 
Weiss 6k Nancy Meyer, Robert Wise 

Friends 

(Gifts of $100 or more) 

Barbara Abrash, American Documentary, Inc., 
John Anderson, Ted 6k Asya Berger, Alan Berliner, 
Regina Berliner, Tessa Blake, Blackside Inc., Doug 
Block, Susan Bodine, Esq., Bob Brodsky, Barbara 
Brooks, Florence Burke, Jeff Bush, Michelle Byrd, 
Pamela Calvert, David Camochan, Rick Carter, 
Christine Choy, Ruth Anne Cohen, Jem Cohen, 
Bob Coleman, Joan Conger, Norman Cowie, Keith 
Crofford, Linda 6k Bob Curtis, Jonathan Dayton, 
Helen De Michiel, Loni Ding, Eileen Douglas, 
Aaron Edison, Bill Einreinhofer, Jon Else, Cassian 
Elwes, Fanlight Productions, Chris Farina, Valerie 
Faris, Larry Fessenden, Film Forum, Bonnie 
Finnegan, Kenneth Fishel, Paul Fitzmaurice, 
William Flemming, Frank Frattaroli, Peter 
Friedman, Archibald Gillies, Patricia Goudvis, 
Barbara Hammer, Henry Hampton, Hal Hartley, 
Richard 6k Elaine Hawk, James Herbert, Kathy 
High, Deborah Hoffman, Ted Hope, Miljan Ilich, 
Zuzana Justman, Ticia Kane, Dai Sil Kim-Gibson, 
Michael Kindle, Valerie Kontakos, Stephen Krai, 
Terry Lawler, Ruby Lerner, Peter Lewnes, Mark 
Lipman, Lawrence Loewinger, Jason Lyon, Charles 
MacFarland, Jodi Magee, Jim McKay, Cara Mertes, 
Deanna Morse, Robb Moss, N. Cheng 6k Company, 
Michel Negroponte, John O'Brien, Jackie Ochs, 
October Films, Off Shore Pictures, Eloise Payne, 
Anthony Peraticos, Mimi Pickering, Robert 
Richter, Ross McElwee, John Schwartz, Nat 
Segaloff, Deborah Shaffer, Lisabeth Shean, Sloss 
Law Office, PC, Vivian Sobchack, Kevin Smith, 
Valerie 6k Jim Smith, Buddy Squires, James Stark, 
George Stoney, Helen Stritzler, Karle Trappe, 
Thunderhead Productions, Toni Treadway, Mark 
Tusk, David Van Taylor, Martha Wallner, David 6k 
Susan Watson, Barton Weiss, Susan Wittenberg, 
Lauren Zalaznick, Skylight Pictures/Pamela Yates, 
Gei Zantzinger, Debra Zimmerman 



If your film lab 
makes you feel KV 




it may be time 
for a move. 



But don't go packing your things just yet — we've done the 
moving for you. Colorlab, the Washington, DC area's leading 
independent film lab is opening an office in Chelsea and we 
have a different approach for the small independent film maker. 
We combine all the services of the large labs with a smaller lab 
approach to customer service. Whether you're working with 
400' or 4000' at a time, you'll never be just a number at Colorlab. 



colorlab ()g)nyc : 

27 west 20th st suite 307 ph 212.633.8172 fax 212.633.8241 



film/video dailies ■ 16mm, super-1 6, 35mm b&w color processing ■ super-1 6 screening ■ 
film-to-tape transfers ■ color corrected prints ■ blow ups ■ blow downs ■ answer prints 



AVIDS TO GO 



Luna delirers. 




\ 




free delivery and set-up in your home or office 

long term //short term rentals 
the most cost-effective way to cut your indie film 




PICTURES 



212 255 2564 



mmsm 



AIVF Announces Two Exciting New Resources 
for Independent Video and Filmmakers! 



These essential resources prepare producers for the many challenges of self-distribution. 

THE AIVF SELF-DISTRIBUTION TOOL KIT 




Edited by loannis Mookas 

$20 AIVF members; $25 non-members 

A collection of articles by filmmakers and industry professionals on how to make a go on your own-and come out ahead. 
The book includes case studies of successful self-distribution models with insight into theatrical and educational distribution for 
features, documentaries, and experimental projects. Tool Kit highlights include interviews with: Arthur Dong (Licensed to 
Kill); Sande Zeig of Artistic License Films; filmmaker and founder of the Austin Film Society, Richard Linklater; underground 
filmmaker, Danny Plotnick; Kay Shaw (Sankofa; Follow Me Home); theatre owner, Greg Laemmle; Jay Craven (Where the 
Rivers Flow North); indie publicists Sharon Kahn and Susan Jacobson; and others. 



THE AIVF EXHIBITORS GUIDE 



Edited by Kathryn Bowser 

$25 AIVF members; $30 non-members 

A road map for navigating venues for the exhibition of your work. The book includes over 800 entries of screening sites, 

from commercial art houses to colleges and universities to artists spaces. This representative sampling will give producers 

and distributors a picture of the exhibition scene in the U.S. today. 

ORDER BOTH COPIES TODAY and get them at the discounted rate of $40 AIVF members; 

$50 non-members. Please include $4 Shipping & Handling per book. 



To order, complete the form below and fax or mail to the AIVF office: 
304 Hudson Street, 6th Fl, NY, NY 10013 
fax 212/463-8519 

For further information, contact Michelle Coe, Program and Information Services Director, 212/807-1400 ext. 235. 



FIVF 

J 

I 

FOUNDATION 
FOR INDEPENDENT 
VIDEO AND FILM 



The AIVF Self-Distribution Tool Kit 

The AIVF Exhibitors Guide 

Both Titles 

$ total amount enclosed (check or money order) OR please bill my C 

account # exp. date signature 



$20 AIVF members; $25 non-members 
$25 AIVF members; $30 non-members 
$40 AIVF members; $50 non-members 
Visa □ MasterCard 



Name 



Address 



Company 



Telephone, 



Fax 



email 



Return to: AIVF/FIVF, 304 Hudson Street, 6th Fl, NY, NY 10013 212/807-1400 ext. 235 Fax 212/463-8519 



NANTUC 



IERE 



WHERE 



mwmwwA 



AL 



OTTERS inherit the earth 

(and shiny awards) 



. his is a call for entries. 
Because without you, we're just a bunch of people sitting in dark rooms 
staring at the wall and wondering what to do with all of the awards. 



JANUARY 1 - MARCH 12: Screenplay Submissions 
JANUARY 1 - APRIL 9: Film Submissions 
WHERE: Nantucket Island, Massachusetts 

1998 WINNERS 

• Tony Cox Award Winner for Best Screenplay DYSFUNCTION JUNCTION by Susan DeMasi #WTM 

• Audience Award Winner for Best Feature Film BLIND FAITH by Frank Military Media#ne 

• Audience Award Winner for Best Short Film DANCE, LEXIE, DANCE by Tim Loane Media#ne 

Annual Screenwriter Tribute sponsored by £i2>NBC 1998 Recipient: Ring Lardner Jr. 



Sponsored in part by: 



^NBC *SSf Media#ne VANITY FAIR #WTM 



For further information, contact www.nantucketfilmfestival.org or 212-642-6339 P.O. Box 688 Prince Street Station, New York, NY 10012 

Design: MKAdvertising Photography: Eric Piasecki 



A S S C I A T I 



I 



r 

OF INDEPENDENT V I D E D AND FILMMAKERS 



Si Docujnentrjrie£ 
M'p the vifdJ choice 
of reuiinj 
in our society, 
j|pjr current popular.'* 

['PcJpcti the 

public^ hunger for 
fjjj/wiukine, thai 
\'j jfree of rhetoric 
dud reib huwun &tori 

rJ is ?;ciTerne 
proud j-y be 
porrer of 




Photo Tom LeGoff 




Design Nik Ives 



Contribute to the Foundation for Independent Video and Film's three year Millennium Campaign Fund which ensures that AIVF/FIVP (publishers '- 
of The Independent) not only survive, but thrive in their mission to serve the growing and diverse independent media community. 



Name. 



Address . 
City 



Enclosed is my gift of independence 

in the amount of: 



State. 



Zip. 



Home Phone . 



.Business Phone. 



I /We wish to be listed in acknowledgements as: 



and up 
Honorary 
Committee 
Member 

Make your check payable to FIVF and return it with this form to FIVF. 304 Hudson St.. 6th Floor. NY. NY 10013. For more information call (2121 807-1400. ext. 223. 
The Foundation for independent Video and Film is a not-for-profit organization. Your contribution is tax-deductible. 



J S35 
I $50 

_| SIDD 

| Other 



J 
J 
J 



MARCH 1 999 A Publication of The Foundation for Independent Video and Film www.aivf.org 



I I 



Jl 





w 



I 



: 




with Arthur Do 
on Self-Distril 
Your Docume 




U 



, 






St Clcrire Boufhe's 

OF VISION 



"74470"8CT 



1 H ' 


6 





3 






> I 



«-T 



kllKIM 



dit Your Distributor 
First Run / Icarus 
for Euro Dollars 



t * 



iul Robeson in Emperor Jones 



TELESCRIPTION LIBRARY • STUDIO 54 LIBRARY • PATHE NEWS, INC HE BIG PIC 



"$£££iu 



#¥mr* 



TfiVl 



\ 



^^n?Si 




■ 



Select from the greatest sources on the planet! 

1 Over 30,000 hours of historic footage 

and musical performance clips. 

Transferred, databased, copyright-cleared 

and instantly available! 



fl^F #4 » 


K } 




1 


.1' 


V ' ' ' 


r*! 










Em j\ \ pifll 5* 


Eft 






AMERICANA • COMMERCIALS 

NEWSREELS • VINTAGE TELEVISION 

BEAUTY SHOTS • SLAPSTICK 

HOLLYWOOD FEATURES 

WILDLIFE • NATURE 

COUNTRY & WESTERN 

ROCK & ROLL • JAZZ & BLUES 




STOCK FOOTAGE LIBRARY 

Call For Free Demo Reel • 1-800-249-1940 • 516-329-9200 • 516-329-9260 fax 
www.historicfilms.com • info@historicfilms.com 



^CLASSIC COMEDY UBRARY • THE RHYTHM & BLUES AWARDS SHOW • STORYVILLE JAZZ 



AM I NG 







i 



vw7 



Jackie Chan and director Brett Ratner, NYFA fans, on the set of the "mega-hit" Rush Hour 

WRITE SHOOT DIRECT EDIT 

YOUR OWN SHORT FILMS IN OUR HANDS-ON EIGHT WEEK 
INTENSIVE TOTAL IMMERSION PROGRAMS FOR INDIVIDUALS 

WITH LITTLE OR NO PRIOR FILMMAKING EXPERIENCE. 
WORK WITH 16MM ARRIFLEX CAMERAS IN SMALL CLASSES 
DESIGNED AND TAUGHT BY AWARD - WINNING INSTRUCTORS. 



SUMMER WORKSHOPS 



NEW YORK CITY PRINCETON & YALE UNIVERSITY UCLA, LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 
PARIS, FRANCE CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY, CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND ROME, ITALY 

SUMMER WORKSHOPS LOCATION - FOUR, SIX AND EIGHT WEEK. 



ADVANCED DIRECTING WORKSHOPS ALSO AVAILABLE. 

NEW WORKSHOPS START THE FIRST MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH IN NEW YORK CITY ALL YEAR ROUND. 



All workshops are solely owned and operated by the New York Film Academy 

new yccr riLM academt 

100 EAST 17TH STREET NEW YORK CITY 10003 TEL: 212-674-4300 FAX: 212-477-1414 
WEB PAGE: www.nyfa.com E-MAIL: film@nyfa.com 



Publisher: Elizabeth Peters 

Editor in Chief: Patricia Thomson 
leditor@aivf.orgl 

Managing Editor: Paul Power 
lindependent@aivf.org] 

Listings Editor: Scott Castle 
lfestivals@aivf.orgl 

Intern: Gesha-Mane Bryant 

Contributing Editors: Lissa Gibbs, Gary 0. Larson, Barbara 

Bliss Osborn, Rob Rownd. Robert L. Seigel, Esq. 

Design Director: Daniel Christmas 
lstartree@xsite.netl 

Advertising Director: Laura D. Davis 

(212)807-1400x225: 

ldisplayads@aivf.orgl 

Advertising Rep: Scott Castle 

(212)807-1400x233: 

lscott@aivf orgl 

Articles from The Independent are archived online at 
Iwww ehbrary coml 

• 

National Distribution: Total Circulation 

(Manhattan) (201) 342-6334; 

Ingram Periodicals (800) 627-6247 

Printed in the USA by Cadmus Journal Services 

POSTMASTER Send address changes to: 
The Independent Film & Video Monthly, 304 Hudson St, 6 fl , NY, NY 10013 

The Independent Film & Video Monthly (ISSN 0731-5198) is published 
monthly except February and September by the Foundation for Independent Video 
and Film (FIVF), a nonprofit, tax-exempt educational foundation dedicated to the 
promotion of video and film. Subscription to the magazine ($55/yr individual: 
$35/yr student: $100/yr nonprofit organization: $150/yr business/industry) is 
included in annual membership dues paid to the Association of Independent Video 
and Filmmakers (AIVF), the national trade association of individuals involved in 
independent film and video Library subscriptions are $75/yr Contact: AIVF 304 
Hudson St.. 6 fl., NY, NY 10013, (212) 807-1400; fax: (212) 463-8519; indepen- 
dent@aivf.org; www.aivf.org Periodical Postage Paid at New York, NY, and at 
additional mailing offices 

Publication of The Independent is made possible in part with public funds from 
the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, and the National Endowment 
for the Arts, a federal agency. Publication of any advertisement in The 
Independent does not constitute an endorsement. AIVF/FIVF are not responsible 
for any claims made in an ad. 

Letters to The Independent should be addressed to the editor Letters may be 
edited for length All contents are copyright of the Foundation for Independent Video 
and Film, Inc. Reprints require written permission and acknowledgement of the arti- 
cle's previous appearance in The Independent The Independent is indexed in the 
Alternative Press Index 

t Foundation for Independent Video & Film, Inc. 1999 
AIVF/FIVF staff: Elizabeth Peters, executive director Michelle Coe. program & infor- 
mation sen/ices director: LaTrice Dixon, membership/advocacy associate; Eugene 
Hernandez, webmaster; Jodi Magee, development consultant; Vailery Moore, mem- 
bership director; Jessica Perez, administrative director; Marya Wethers, member- 
ship assistant. 

AIVF/FIVF legal counsel: Robert I. Fieedman, Esq., Leavy, Rosensweig & Hyman 

AIVF/FIVF Board of Directors. Loni Ding (co-president), Lee Lew-Lee. Graham 
Leggat. Ruby Lerner*. Peter Lewnes. Richard Lmklater Cynthia Lopez*, Diane 
Markrow (secretary), Jim McKay. Robb Moss (chair), Elizabeth Peters (ex officio), 
Robert Richter (treasurer). James Schamus*. Valerie Soe. Barton Weiss (co-presi- 
dent) ' FIVF Board of Directors only 




March 1999 

VOLUME 22, NUMBER 2 www.a/fVg 




Features 

28 It's a Dong Deal 

Documentary maker Arthur Dong chose to self-distribute Licensed to Kill, despite the many offers that 
came his way after its success at Sundance '97. Here he talks about the hows and whys of doing it 
yourself. BY IANNIS MOOKAS 

32 Elusive Memories, Modern Myths: The Films of Jay Anania 

As austere as Bresson and elliptical as Ashbury, feature director Jay Anania's latest feature, Long Time 
Since, occupies challenging turf between fieri* >n, px >etry, and myth. BY JEREMY LEHRER 

34 Bourne to be Wild 

With his new film on Paul Robeson for American Masters, producer/director St. Clair Bourne adds 
another to his list of documentaries on charismatic and controversial black men in the political and 
cultural arenas. BY RlCHARP BAIMBRIDGE 










2 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 





4 News 

New exhibition venues for indies: the Egyptian 
Theatre in L.A.; ZKM in Germany; and a cross- 
border initiative in Montreal and New York City. 
by Stephen Garrett, George 
Fifield & Jerry White 

12 Profiles 

Video artists John Muse & Jeanne Finley; 
Celia Dougherty; and Peggy Ahwesh. 
by Isabel Sanduri, Lyn Love 6k 
Jeremy Lehrer 



16 Fest Circuit 

Reviews of the International Documentary 
Filmfestival Amsterdam and Cofinancing 
Forum, the Pandaemonium Video Festival, 
DocCon3, the International Expo of Short 
Film, and the Thessaloniki Film Festival. 
by Patricia Thomson, 
Ernest Larsen, Barbara 
Bliss Osborn, Gesha-Marie 
Bryant, and Cleo 
Cacoulidis 

Cover photo courtesy American Masfers/WNET 




Departments 

24 Legal Briefs 

Think your distributor or sales agent is holding out when it comes time 
to pay up? Some advice on when to audit your distributor and how to 
write a contract that makes sure you can. 
by Robert Seigel 



FAQ&lnfo 

Distributor F.A.Q. 38 

Since its creation a dozen years ago, 

First Run/Icarus has been a major 

player among nontheatrical 

distributors. 

BY LlSSA GlBBS 

Funder F.A.Q. 40 



One of the most active of CBP's 

minority consortia is the National 

Asian American Telecommunications Association (NAATA), which 

funds, exhibits, and distributes Asian American media. 

by Michelle Coe 



Festivals 42 
Notices 46 
Classifieds 51 




@AIVF 



Events 56 

Info & Resources 58 

In & Out of Production 59 

Salons 60 

Trade Discounts 61 





March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 3 



NEWS 



ARTHOUSES 



EDITED BY PAUL POWER 



LA. Showcase 



GETS BIGGER 
AND BETTER 




Since debuting in December 1995 as a five- 
day festival with shorts by David Lynch, Todd 
Haynes, and Mary Harron, American 
Cinematheque's Alternative Screen has 
become one of the most respected and high- 
profile showcases in L.A. for independent films 
without distribution. "I remember it being one 
of the best screenings of my film," says Dante 
Harper, director ot The Delicate Art of the Rifle, 
which has played twice at Alternative Screen, 
an ongoing series at the nonprofit American 
Cinematheque. "Something about the audi- 
ence was really good, and the place was packed. 
People [in L.A.] really respond to this," he 
notes. Carrie Ansell, director of the comedy 
Flushed, which played at the Cinematheque last 
year and got picked up by Castle Hill tor release 
later in 1999, agrees. "There's definitely pres- 
tige: it gets respected and reviewed. 
Alternative Screen guarantees you that." She 
adds that the venue has a "laid-back atmos- 
phere. People are really open to seeing new 
faces, new writers, and new directors." 

With the reopening of the American 
Cinematheque on December 4th in the lushly 
renovated and cavernous Grauman's Egyptian 
Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard, Alternative 
Screen now finds itself with the opportunity to 
show its eclectic fare in a 660-seat venue with 
a two-storey screen and state-of-the-art projec- 
tion equipment. 

Compared with the Cinematheque's former 
home in a cozy 150-seat screening room at 
Raleigh Studios, the Egyptian is a major step 
forward in the organization's ability to host and 
celebrate filmmakers, particularly with its long, 
grand entranceway leading from the street to 
the theater's main doors and its plans for a film 
bookstore and late-night restaurant which 
practically insist 'hat audience members linger 



and mingle before and after a film. The accom- 
modations now allow for the possibility of regu- 
lar post- screening receptions, part of a larger 
plan Margot Gerber, producer of Alternative 
Screen, has for Alternative Screen to find cor- 
porate sponsorship. This would enable the 
Cinematheque to pay rental fees for the films 
they show, as well as honorariums to the film- 
makers and plane tickets to fly them in for 
screenings. But after having raised $13 million 
for the Egyptian, the Cinematheque will have 
to look outside the film community for dona- 
tions. "Hollywood's kind of tapped out on us," 
Gerber laughs. 

The Cinematheque has a second, 88-seat 
theater built into the Egyptian, which will play 
a documentary film on Hollywood during the 
day, but it can also be rented out as a screening 
room and used for press screenings of 
Cinematheque films. It may even be part of the 
Cinematheque's way of running an Alternative 
Screen film for a weeklong engagement, possi- 
bly opening a film on the main screen for one or 
two days and then moving it to the smaller 
screen for the rest of its run. "There would be 
opportunities to do a four-wall or split revenue 
with the box office on par with an opening at 
the Laemmle Theaters or the Nuart," Gerber 
says, mentioning two commercial and more tra- 
ditional Los Angeles outlets for independent 
and self-distributed films. 



This Nubian visage from the 
past adorns the newly 
restored Egyptian Theatre, 
home of the American 
Cinematheque. 



Alternative Screen currently holds twice- 
monthly screenings on alternate Thursdays. 
These not only get publicized in the American 
Cinematheque's film calendar, but are also vir- 
tually guaranteed reviews in the L.A. Times and 
LA. Weekly — sometimes even landing in the 
Hollywood Reporter and Variety. "The filmmak- 
ers are getting an incredible deal when they 
screen with us," explains Gerber. She and sub- 
missions coordinator Julie LaBassiere specifical- 
ly choose films that aren't necessarily pre- 
mieres, but have played the festival circuit and 
haven't yet made it to L.A. "People should go 
to the festivals," she says, emphasizing that she 
doesn't want to compete for discoveries but 
does want to offer filmmakers a chance to be 
seen by the industry. 

"It got me work, basically," says Daniel 
Harris, director of The Bible and Gun Club, who 
received calls from a dozen L.A. -based film 
development companies (including one from 
Ron Meyer's office at Universal) after glowing 
reviews came out in the trades. Having the 
L.A. screening also helped the film to be nom- 
inated for three Independent Spirit Awards. "I 
keep getting people coming up to me saying 
they saw it at the Cinematheque." 

Rhode Island filmmaker Craig Richardson 
was optimistic after the screening of his film 
Anima. "I got good feedback out of it and con- 
tacts for festivals. Now that the Egyptian is 



4 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 




From the turn of the century to its approaching 
climax, the historical events that have shaped our 
times are mere fingertips away. 

Your Source for the 20th Century! 

Nobody in the footage business has as much 
news footage as ABCNews VideoSource! We've combined 
three of the world's finest news and stock footage 
collections - ABC News, Worldwide Television News, 



and British Movietone News - at America's newest 
and most modern footage resource. If it happened from 
1900 right up to today, we've got it covered! 

The great thing is, it's all so easy to access. 
Just click us up on the Web or, even better, come visit 
our fantastic facility in person. Our highly-skilled 
and footage-sawy Customer Service Representatives 
will simplify your search. It's footage searching the 
way it should be! 



For the fastest, easiest way to find 
the exact footage you want, come to the Source! 

©ABCNEWS 

VideoSource 

125 West End Avenue at 66th Street • New York, NY 10023 
800 • 789 • 1250 • 212 • 456 • 5421 • FAX 212 • 456 • 5428 

Visit http://www.abcnewsvsource.com 



©1998 



march 
12-20 
a u s t i n 
t e x a s 



"Without question, SXSW is 
the most unspoiled mecca 
of independent film at play 
today. A sense of discovery 
pervades the festival at every 
turn. Its kinship to the best of 
emerging music lends a 
uniqueness to the whole town 
and all of its visitors." 
-Jeff Lipsky, Samuel 
Goldwyn Films 

The Conference is a place 
where veterans and novices 
share information about not 
just getting your films made, 
but achieving the widest 
possible audience. 
SXSW Film provides a great 
meeting place, important 
conference programming and, 
most importantly, the Festival is 
committed to showing a broad 
range of new films. 

SXSW FILM 
P.O. Box 4999 
Austin, TX 78765 
tel 512 / 467-7979 
fax 512/ 451-0754 
e-mail sxsw@sxsw.com 

For more information, or to 
register online, visit us at 
www.sxsw.com 



south by southwest film conference & festival 





MGD 

MUSIC 



MITiJM.T 




Film Conference: March 12-16 
Film Festival: March 12-20 




open," he adds, "people will probably seek it out 
more." Gerber, though, has no immediate plans 
either to change the nature of her programming 
("In a nutshell, films that use the medium to 
tell their story in a unique way") or the fre- 
quency of screenings. "With individual film- 
makers we give them so much attention that 
it's really difficult to do it on a weekly basis. We 



MUSEUMS 



still don't have a large staff," she says, "but we 
do have an ambitious one." 

For submissions or more info contact: 
Alternative Screen, American Cinematheque, 
6712 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90028; 
(323) 466-FILM x. 1 1 7; wwii'.egyptiantheatre.com 

Stephen Garrett 

Stephen Garrett is a film editor and freekince writer 
living in Los Angeles. 



Wilkommen to Deutschland 

ZKM, a Mega-Media Center Unveiled 



Wunderbar: Karlsruhe's new media center, 
Zentrum fur Kunst und Medientechnologie (ZKM). 



Imagine mixing the Guggenheim Museum, 
the San Francisco Exploratorium, the Com- 
puter Museum in Boston, and the Media Lab at 
M.I.T. together in a single institution. The Zen- 
trum fur Kunst und Medientechnologie (ZKM) 
in Karlsruhe, 
Germany, is 
one of a very 
few organiza- 
tions in the 
world solely 
devoted to 
new media 
art. Funded 
by the state of 
Baden-Wiirt- 
temburg and 
the city of 
Karlsruhe, it 
currently 
houses seven 



state-of-the-art computing, audio, and video 
centers and invite artists from around the world 
for residencies lasting from three months to a 
year. The Music and Acoustics Institute 
includes a grand music recording space large 




Courtesy ZKM 



institutions under one roof, with more planned. 
There are two museums: a Museum for 
Contemporary Art, which integrates contem- 
porary art, painting, and photography with 
numerous video installations, and a New Media 
Museum. There is a media theater and an 
extensive sound and video art library. In addi- 
tion, the ZKM houses two Institutes of New 
Media, one for Visual Media and one for Music 
and Acoustics. There are plans for a new muse- 
um of modern and contemporary art to be com- 
pleted in a few years. A short distance away in 
Karlsruhe there is also the affiliated Academy 
of Design. 

The Institutes are the truly amazing part of 
the ZKM. Both the Institute for Visual Media 
(under media artist Jeffrey Shaw) and the 
Institute for Music and Acoustics (directed by 
Joannes Goebel) are built around excellent 



enough for both orchestra and audience — and 
its own record label. 

Publicly funded, the two institutes are truly 
artists' havens. The Institute for Visual Media 
invited its first artists in 1991, showcasing more 
than 30 major projects, including multimedia, 
interactive installations, animations, and CD- 
ROMs by artists from around the world. In 
1997, Bill Viola created a masterful work called 
The Tree of Knowledge. As one walks down a 50 
foot corridor, a computer-generated image of a 
sapling at the far end grows, ages, and dies 
according to one's position in the hallway. Walk 
fast and the tree ages quickly, walk backward 
and it grows younger. Other fellows include 
major interactive artists and theorists like 
Simon Penny, Miroslaw Rogala, Bill Seaman, 
and Chris Dodge. A series of "CD- 
ROMagazines" called Artintact have helped 



' J"*\ Ml ml mimi 



POST 

mmwifj 



mm 



€veriithing far 
Past Prnducitiaa 



FULL LABORATORY S€RVIC€S 

T€L€Cin€ 

€DITORIAL 

Past Prod. Supervisors 

Dailies Sunning 

€dge Coding 

Film €diting 

Digital nonlinear 
Flatbed 

Assistant €diting 

On-Line €diting 

Cquipment Rental 
SP€CIAL €FF€CTS 

Digital/Optical 
SOUflD 

Design 

€diting 

€ffects 

Foleu 

ADR 

mixing 

Sweetening 

Transfers 
1/4" to 
DAT to 
fTlag. to 




music 

Composing 
Recording 
€diting 
Libraru 
VID€0 DUBBin 
TITL€S & CR€ 
n€QATIV€ C 
VID€0 TO FI 
DIGITAL 



UUe are an independent Group 

of Businesses that make uour 

Past Production nightmare a 

DR€ Am 



For more Information call 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 7 



LORLAB fixes 



lot Enough Pre-Roll 




rocessmg 



and 



video 



dailies 



Ever had yourtelecine bill explode 
due to field audio problems? 

Colorlab just installed the latest 
in digital audio workstations — 

The Aaton Indaw 

automatic syncing station 
in both Rank suites. 

* r 

conjunction with the Aaton time 
code cameras, our new system automatically 
syncs the audio in real time. (With SmartSlate, 
syncing is almost automatic.) 

We make a CD digital clone of all your field 
audio while your film is being processed. We 
can place all manner of data in the three line 
VITC such as: 

Keycode Info 
_ Audio time code as exactly recorded in the 

field (no more pesky offsets) 

■ House time code 

■ And show it in a window dub. 

The possibilities are endless. 



How much extra does this cost? 

NADA, ZIP, ZERO! 

(unless of course, you want to buy a digital CD clone 

of all of your field audio for archiving, pre-mix element, 

lightning fast wild sound searches or to stick in your Avid.) 

As a pro-film origination facility, Colorlab is proud 
to offer another important tool for filmmakers. 



5708 Arundel Ave. 
Rockville, MD 20852 



COLOR 

phone 301.770.2128 fax. 301.816.0798 



27 West 20th St. #307 

New York, NY 10011 
phone 212.633.8172 fax212.633.82A1 



present this exceptional interactive work to a 
broader international audience. Many of these 
works are on exhibit in the New Media 
Museum in the same building. 

The original idea for the center was pro- 
posed in 1985 and subsequently funded jointly 
by the state of Baden-Wiirttemburg and the 
city of Karlsruhe. After a series of false starts 
and funding objections, sometimes wrapped in 
a general scepticism toward technology, a cer- 
tain clarity came to the project when Heinrich 
Klotz took over as director in 1989. He was 
able to provide the unifying vision needed to 
enlist the various forces of local politicians, 
international artists, and architects. Through- 
out the nineties as negotiations and construc- 
tion plans proceeded, the ZKM began program- 
ming, sponsoring a biannual Multimediale for 
new media, an annual international video art 
prize, and the biannual Siemens media art prize 
in collaboration with electronics giant Siemens 
AG. The Institute for Music and Acoustics has 
started issuing a series of new music CDs under the 
imprint Edition ZKM. 

A recent example of projects from the insti- 
tute is a digital life artwork by Bernd 
Lintermann, a visual artist, and Torsten 
Belschner, a fellow in the Music and Acoustics 
Institute. In Sono Morphis, the audience, either 
in the installation or through the Web, can 
control the characteristics ("genomes") and the 
position of a three-dimensional creature on the 
screen. It is modified by clicking on a row of 
creatures with certain genomes in a menu at 
the bottom of the screen. It is designed to be 
seen with 3-D flicker glasses, projected large 
and in color. Each genome has its own sound — 
deliberately industrial metallic sounds which 
contrast with the organic forms o{ the crea- 
tures — while combining genomes blends 
sounds so a very complex and uniquely sound- 
ing creature appears. On a large projected 
screen, a full-color truly 3-D creature of your 
own invention leaps out of the wall and dances 
in front of you, coming amazingly and freaking- 
ly close. 

Zentrum fur Kunst und Medientechnologie, 
Lorenzstrafie 19, D- 76 1 35 Karlsruhe, Germany; 
001 49 721 81 00-0; fax: 81 00 1139; info@ 
zkm.de; www.zkm.de 

George Fifield 

George Fifield IgeorgeO' visionspace.org] is the Adjunct 

Curator of Media Arts at the DeCordova Museum and 

Sculpture Park in Lincoln, Massachusetts. He is also 

director of VisionSpace, Inc., a nonprofit arts organiza- 

turn presenting the 1 999 Boston Cyberarts Festival. 



8 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



POES YOUR LIBRARY 

HAVE THE 

INDEPENDENT? 

Take this coupon to your 
school or public librarian and 
request a subscription today! 

10 issues/yr. 

Library subscription rate $75 

($90 foreign) 

Published by the Foundation for 

Independent Video and Film 

ISSN 0731-0589 

Order from FIVF, 

304 Hudson St., 6th Fl v NY, NY 10013; 

(212) 807-1400 x222; members@aivf.org 

EBSCO: (205) 991-6600 

fax: (205) 991-1479 

Faxon (US): (800) 283-2966; 

(Can) (519) 472-1005 
(Can) fax: (519) 472-1072 



3ttXa 



H 



Get these essential books delivered right to your doori 

Liquidation Special on AIVF/FTVF books 

The ATVF/FIVF Guide to International Film & Video Festivals 
Kathryn Bowser, ed.; $17 $ 

The ATVF/FIVF Guide to Film & Video Distributors 

Kathryn Bowser, ed.; $12 $ 

The Next Step: A Film and Video Distribution Handbook 

Morrie Warshawski, ed.; $12 $ 

OR...order all three for just $30 and save! $ 

Alternative Visions: Distributing Independent Video 

in a Home Video World Debra Franco; $9.95 $ 

Contracts for the Film & Television Industry 

Mark Litwak; $29.95 $ 

Director's Journey Mark Travis; $26.95 $ 

Directing Actors: Creating Memorable Performances 

for Film and TV Judith Weston; $26.95 $ 

Film and Video Budgets Michael Wiese; $26.95 $ 

Film and Video Financing Michael Wiese; $22.95 $ 

Film and Video Marketing Michael Wiese; $18.95 $ 

Film Directing Shot by Shot: Visualizing from Concept 

to Screen Steven D. Katz; $24.95 $ 

Film Directing Shot by Shot: Cinematic Motion 

Steven D. Katz; $24.95 $ 

The Independent Film & Videomakers Guide (2nd Ed.) 

Michael Wiese; $29.95 $ 

Persistence of Vision: An Impractical Guide 
to Producing a Feature Film For Under $30,000 

John Gaspard & Dale Newton; $26.95 $ 

Production Assistant Guidelines Sandy Curry; $6.00 $ 

The Search for Reality: The Art of 

Documentary Filmmaking Michael Tobias, ed; $29.95 $ 

Surviving Production: The Art of 

Production Management Deborah Patz; $26.95 $ 

The Writer's Journey (2nd Ed.) 

Christopher Vogler; $22.95 $ 

Postage/handling: US - $3.50 1st book, $1.00 ea. addl 

Foreign - $5.00 1st book, $1.50 ea. addl $ 



TOTAL 



Make checks payable to FIVE, and send order to: 304 Hudson St., 6th Fl., 
New York, NY 10013; or charge by phone: (212) 807-1400 x303; 
fax: (212) 463-8519, or order from our website: www.aivf.org. 

Look for our new self-distribution resource books coming soon! 






A Beautiful 



Quebec Tycoon & Impresario 
Build Two Media Centers 



A RENOVATED STOREFRONT IN NEW YORK AND A 
three-storey building in Montreal are the open- 
ing salvos in the new struggle for "auteur cine- 
ma" that's being launched by Montreal software 
tycoon Daniel Langlois in collaboration with 
that city's favorite cinema impresario, Claude 
Chamberlain. Under the umbrella of the 
recently created Daniel Langlois Foundation 
for Art and Science, a host of projects support- 
ing film, video, and new media are set to 
unfold, and these two buildings may provide 
some much-needed infrastructure for the cul- 
tural and perhaps cinematic capitals of French 
and English North America. 

Langlois has a long-standing relationship 
with cinema, having gotten his start as an ani- 
mator at the National Film Board of Canada. In 
1986, he founded the software company 
Softimage, which has developed a specializa- 
tion in 3D computer animation and effects soft- 
ware (used on Titanic, 
Men in Black, and 
Jurassic Park). In 1994 
Softimage merged with 
Microsoft, and Langlois 
remains head of the 
company he started in 
addition to taking over 
some Microsoft responsi- 
bilities (his title is Senior 

Director, Advanced Authoring Technology for 
Microsoft's Computer System Division). He 
created his foundation in 1997 "to support the 
development of projects calling for cooperation 
between people from a variety of fields, such as 
artists, scientists, engineers, or technologists." 
He is also the founder and head of a real estate 
company, Terra Incognita, which he is using to 
create buildings devoted to cinema in both 
Montreal and New York. 

The largest of those buildings will be built on 
the Boulevard St. Laurent, the heart of 
Montreal's fashionable "Plateau" area. With a 
provisional name of "La Complexe Cinemato- 
graphique," Langlois' cinematic cathedral will 
contain two fully equipped screening rooms 
which will be devoted to independent cinema, 
a video store operated by La Boite Noir 
(Montreal's leading independent video store), 
a hall for exhibitions, and various offices for the 
foundation. 




"Before the Cinema Parallele as you 
know it, I really wanted to build a home 
of cinema and multimedia. For 22 years 
I looked. I went through six multi-mil- 
lionaires, and the seventh one was the 
good one, Daniel Langlois." 

- Claude Chamberlain 



The Complexe, scheduled to open March 1, 
is being launched with the close collaboration 
of Chamberlain, who has for 27 years run the 
Montreal Festival of New Cinema and for 30 
years the tiny, funky screening room Cinema 
Parallele. Both of Chamberlain's institutions, 
which have been at the heart of Montreal's 
vital independent film movement, will essen- 
tially be transplanted (and expanded) into the 
new Complexe. The transplant couldn't have 
come at a more fortuitous time: for several 
years, the Festival of New Cinema had been in 
major financial trouble, 
with a debt of around 
C$300,000. Many 

observers feared that it 
would soon collapse 
under its own weight. 
When Langlois stepped 
in to help Chamberlain, 
he cleared his debts, and 
by creating the new 
complex to house the festival operations, gave 
him a degree of security that he had never 
known. 

The creation of this kind of cinematic mecca 
has been a dream of Chamberlain's for some 
while. "Before the Cinema Parallele as you 
know it, I really wanted to build [a cinema 
complex]," he recalls. "It was [to be] three the- 
aters, a home of cinema and multimedia." He 
jokes that the basic idea of his earlier complex 
was "to be in advance of everyone in the world, 
at least for 15 minutes." It didn't pan out as he 
had planned, though, and he recalls that the 
earlier complex he tried to build "was C$2 mil- 
lion and at the last second I couldn't get the 
money. So I built this cafe cinema [the Cinema 
Parallele, with the intimate Cafe Melies 
attached] and for 22 years I looked. I went 
through six multi-millionaires, and the seventh 
one was the good one, Daniel Langlois." 

Chamberlain's dreams are famously multi- 



National 
Educational 
Media 
Network 



th 




supporting excellence in 
educational media 

Presents 

Content '99 



13th Annual Media Market 

Conference & Festival 

May 19-22, 1999 

Airport Hilton Hotel 

Oakland, CA 

The Nation's Only Event Exclusively for 
Educational Media Professionals 



Media Market 

May 19-21 

The best, low-cost way to find a 

distributor for works-in-progress or 

finished productions 

Submission Deadlines: 

Early Bird: March 15 

Final: April 27 

Conference 

May 20-21 

Learn the latest trends in production, 

distribution & exhibition 

Early Bird Deadline: April 19 

Apple Awards 
Film & Video Festival 

May 21-22 

A curated selection of Apple Award winners 

at the Oakland Museum of California 



"The Media Market was key in securing 

distribution. Meeting so many distributors 

face to face was invaluable. I will definitely 

be back with my next film!" 

Lisa Leeman, Fender Philosophers 



NEMN 

655 Thirteenth St., Suite 100 

Oakland, CA 94612-1220 

PH: 510.465.6885 FX: 510.465.2835 

E-Mail: content@nemn.org 

www.nemn.org 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 9 




MERCER STREET 



jPro Xools 
Media lOO 



Sound Design • Original Music • Sound Effects 

Voice Over and ADR • Sound Editing and Mixing 

Non Linear Video Editing • Multimedia and Internet 



S»un„ 

a t \ Alan Berliner • Lisa Lewenz • Jem Cohen • Cathy Cook 

DIGITAL AUDIO Maria Venuto • Shelley Silver • Brett Morgen • Tony Oursler 

""PRODUCTION™ Peggy Ahwesh • Kathy High • Ellen Spiro • Lewis Klahr 

for Film and Video Ardele Lister • Hillary Brougher • Adam Cohen • Greg Bordowitz 

Discount Rates for Independents 



and Multimedia 



76 MERCER ST. NYC 10012 • 212.966-6794 • E-mailmercerst@aol.com 



Let's Make History 



At WPA, all we really 
think about is history. 
And time. We're a film 
and video archive, and 
we act as custodians to 
the world's most cele- 
brated collections of 
moving images. We 
provide historical 
footage to television 
programs. Lots of it. All 
of it wonderful to look 
at. But we also provide 
ideas. And context. And 
a producer's sensibility. 
When you work with 
WPA, you work with a 
remarkable team of his- 
torians and archivists, 
researchers and artists, 
movie buffs and rights 
specialists. We call 
ourselves Merchants of 
Time. Let's Work Together. 
Let's Make History. 



British Pathe 
News Archive 
(1896 to 1970) 



WETA-TV 

Public 

Television 

Archive 

(1965 to 1999) 




The Hullabaloo 

Archive of 
Popular Culture 
(1964 to 1966) 



The 

ColorStock 

Archive of Retro 

Americana 
(1945 to 1975) 



40,000 hours of history, 

music, nature, and 

popular culture 



The WPA Film Library 

Merchants of Time 



1-800-777-2223 



www.mpimedia.com/wpa 



16101 South 108th Avenue • OrlanJ Park, IL • 60467 • 708-460-0555 • Fax: 708-460-0187 • Email: ttpasales@mpimedia.cu 



faceted, however. He jokingly notes that "nor- 
mally you sell only one thing. Me, I'm selling 
many things at the same time." One of those 
other things is a cinematheque in New York, 
which he also convinced Langlois to build. 
Scheduled for a March 1 opening, this multi- 
media meeting place (which the building per- 
mit identifies as "Media and Beyond") is to be 
located in an old storefront at 47 Mercer Street 
between Broome and Grand, in the heart of 
SoHo's gallery district. The upstairs of the 
building will be home to a film, video, and new 
media production company called Principia, 
and the downstairs will be a 100-seat screening 
room for independent cinema from around the 
world. "I was dreaming to have a theater in 
New York, so at least you have a place to show 
Canadian and Quebec films, video, and new 
media," Chamberlain recalls. He is quick to 
add that it will "also [show] foreign work, but 
[it will be] a place that [Canadian and Quebec 
filmmakers] don't have to run after an exhi- 
bitor. A place of our own." 

At press time, construction was under way 
on the both the New York and Montreal build- 
ings, so the Langlois cinematic empire is still a 
work in progress. Nevertheless, the marshalling 
of Chamberlain and Chamberlain, two formi- 
dable forces in the Canadian independent film 
scene, represents a real consolidation of 
strength in Montreal's film community. 
Langlois' expansion into the U.S. should, if 
nothing else, be extremely interesting: inde- 
pendent film works differently in Quebec, and 
this meeting of national cinematic traditions 
should shake up more than a tew complacen- 
cies on both sides of the border. 

Cinema Parallel?, (514) 843-4725; Daniel 
Langlois Foundation, (514) 987-7177. 

Jerry White 

Jerry White is a doctoral student in Comparative 

Literature at the University of Alberta, where he also 

teaches Film Studies. 

OBITUARIES 

Henry Hampton, one of the foremost 
documentary filmmakers in the U.S., died 
November 22 in Boston after complications 
arising from lung cancer. He was 58. 

A veteran of the Civil Rights movement, 
Hampton's six-hour 1987 magnum opus, Eyes 
on the Prize, was inspired by his participation in 
the "Bloody Sunday" march at Selma, 
Alabama, in 1965. The public television series, 
which he executive produced, is considered the 
definitive work on the Civil Rights movement 
up to 1965. It won four Emmys, the Peabody 



10 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 




Henry Hampton, Eyes on 
the Prize creator. 



Award for excellence in 
journalism, and an Os- 
car nomination. Other 
noteahle work produced 
through his Bos ton - 
based company, Black- 
side Inc., includes The 
Great Depression (1993) 
and America's War on 
Poverty (1995). His 
most recent production 
was 17/ Make Me a 
World, dealing with 
20th century African- 
American artists. 
William Gardner Harley, former president 
of the National Association of Educational 
Broadcasters (NAEB) died November 7, aged 
87, in Washington DC after a heart ailment. 
Harley, who headed NAEB from 1960-75, was 
instrumental in securing FM and TV channels 
for educational broadcasting, federal legislation 
for station construction, and the establishment 
of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. He 
had been chairman of the Peabody Awards 
board and headed both the Educational Media 
Council and the Joint Council on Educational 
Telecommunications. 

Edmond A. Levy, documentary maker, died 



October 10 of cancer, aged 69. Levy, director of 
over 120 documentaries, was nominated for 
two Academy Awards for short documentary 
and won an Oscar in 1966 with a third short, A 
Year Toward Tomorrow, about the Vista volun- 
teer program. Other work included writing and 
directing for NBC, CBS, ABC, PBS, and the 
Disney Channel. 

SHORT ENDS 

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and 

Sciences' Board of Governors decided at their 
January 7th meeting to abolish the Docu- 
mentary Short Film category. From 1999 (i.e. 
the ceremony for 1999 films, held in March 
2000), Oscar's Documentary Feature and 
Documentary Short Film Awards will be 
included in a single documentary category. 

"We kept a separate award for shorts alive as 
long as we could justify it — and beyond that," 
Academy president Robert Rehme stated in an 
AMPAS press release. "The combined category 
will continue to give the really extraordinary 
short theatrical documentary a place to be rec- 
ognized, but except for the Imax films, there 
really isn't enough non-television work in the 
genre to justify a separate award these days." 

Betsy McLean, executive director of the 



International Documentary Association, told 
The Independent that the Academy's decision 
was "a shame and a mistake." She noted how 
the IDA themselves had, until recently, given 
awards in a single documentary category but 
now, contrary to the Academy's trend, give 
awards for both short and feature docs. 

Check out AIVF's website for more details. 

ERRATA 

In the Jan./Feb. news story "What's Up 
with NLCC?," Jose Luis Ruiz, the former exec- 
utive director of the National Latino 
Communications Center, was incorrectly iden- 
tified as Jose Luis Rodriguez. In the same arti- 
cle, an editing error indicated that there had 
been financial activity between CPB and 
NLCC in 1998. In fact CPB's last check to 
NLCC was a bridge loan in November 1997 to 
the minority consortium. The last payment to 
NLCC under CPB's FY97 contract was made in 
September 1997. 

In "Queen of the Night" [Dec. '98], Ayoka 
Chenzira's film M;y Own TV, shown at the third 
annual Night of the Black Independents festi- 
val, was incorrectly identified as The Choice. In 
"Windy Films" [Nov. '98] the name of writer 
Nadine Ekrek was spelled incorrectly. 



Nuts & Bolts is about production planning -- what you do before you walk onto the set. 

"If you plan to make a movie, take this course!" 

- Jerry Ziesmer, 1st AD, "Jerry Maguire", "Apocalypse Now" 



ROBERT 
50KD\GA'S 




Nuts 
& Bolts 

PRODUCTION SEMINARS 



Nuts & Bolts I: 

Principles and Practice of 
Scheduling and Budgeting 
Los Angeles Feb 20-21 
New York Mar 13-14 

Nuts & Bolts II: 

Finer Points of Line Producing 
New York Mar 27-28 
Los Angeles Apr 3-4 

1 -800-755-7763 

www.onbudget.com 



Nuts & Bolts is "for everyone at every level of experience." 

- Todd Hallowell, Executive Producer, "Apollo 13", "Ransom" 






March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 11 




John Muse § 
Jeanne Mnleij 

NIGHT WITHOUT OBJECTS 



by Isabel Sadurni 




The car keys are missing. "If I were a real 
artist," says San Francisco-based video artist 
John Muse, checking the underbelly of a stack 
of mail, "I would have created an inexpensive 
strategy for transporting art installations to the 
gallery that doubled as a airport shuttle for my 
girlfriend, but instead, I rented a $200-a-week 
car, and now we've lost the keys." 

Jeanne Finley, experimental filmmaker, 
video artist, Fulbright scholar, Guggenheim fel- 
low, and long-time collaborator with Muse, 
helps him look. She is back in town for a 
screening of their latest video, O Night without 
Objects: A Trilogy, and the gallery opening of 
the companion installation. A long-time San 
Franciscan, she currently lives in Brooklyn and 
has a teaching gig at New York University. 
Finley stirs a bowl of keys to investigate. 
Somehow this overturning of personal objects 
and retracing of steps to find "the key" parallels 



the method by which Finley and Muse's O 
Night without Objects came into being. 

"Ten years ago, I found The Adventures of 
Blacky in a thrift store in Roanoke, Virginia, in 
the middle of nowhere," says Muse, referring to 
a package of psychological test cards centered 
around the hypothetical situations of a cartoon 
black cocker spaniel. (For instance, they ask, 
"Here Blacky is licking herself. Who might 
Blacky be thinking about here? Is 
Blacky afraid? What will Mama 
say if she finds Blacky?") "When 
I found it, I didn't take it serious- 
ly," Muse recalls. A decade later, 
the thrift store object became the 
prompt for O Night without 
Objects, which comprises three 
thematically-linked episodes that 
explore the (re) construction of 
family, hate speech (and its 
reversibility), and the rituals of 
conversion. As the videomakers 
describe the trilogy, "Blacky nar- 
rates the administration of a psy- 
chological test to a young girl. 
Based on a Story explores the con- 
version and death of Nebraska's 
KKK Grand Dragon after his 
harassment and subsequent 
friendship with the local Cantor. 
And Time Bomb tells of a young 
girl's experience at a Baptist 
camp." 

At first, Finley recalls, "We did- 
n't know what to do with [The 
Adventures of Blacky], even 
though we talked about it a lot. 
Then in 1992, we read about the Trapp-Weisser 
story in Time magazine and considered how we 
might tie the two together." The now Disney- 
optioned narrative tells the story of Larry 
Trapp, a former KKK Grand Dragon, who is 
adopted into Rabbi Weisser's family and subse- 
quently converts to Judaism. Muse expands, 
"The Weisser-Trapp story is about Larry's recre- 
ation of a childhood and the family he never 
had. This idea is carried through in Time Bomb, 
which begins with a girl alone, who, through 
relationships of power, finds acceptance. So 
each story retraces the conversion theme, in its 
own way." 

Several earlier incarnations of O Night with- 
out Objects helped galvanize its purpose and 
execution as a now powerful, hour-long trilogy, 
which has screened at New York's Museum of 
Modern Art and Lincoln Center, the Pacific 
Film Archives, and a number of festivals. An 



early manifestation was an outdoor, site-specif- 
ic installation for the Mill Valley Film Festival 
that used public telephones, mail, cable access, 
and outdoor projection to mimic the channels 
of communication used by Trapp and the 
Weissers. 

This was followed by a screening at the 
Pacific Film Archives of the Adventures of 
Blacky segment. It was during this public 
moment that the videomakers realized they 
were dissatisfied with their cut. ("You can tell 
people it's okay to fail in front of large groups of 
people," assures Muse). The duo subsequently 
restructured and layered these disparate parts 
into the trilogy. More recently, it has taken new 
shape as a three-dimensional sculpture/video 
installation. 

"It was great to see what we were able to do 
with an installation," says Muse. While the 
narrative track remains the same, the visual 
component has been split apart and amplified, 
becoming even more textured. A huge pile of 
pencil shavings sits at the center of the gallery 
floor under a hobbled classroom chair, pointing 
to the process of "inscription" or the influence 
of others on one's identity. Mirrored relief etch- 
ings of The Adventures of Blacky cards are in 
one room and blinking colored slides in anoth- 
er. "What we've done is to separate into two 
image channels the cards themselves being 
shown to a young girl, and the girl's flight of 
fancy, where one escapes when being bombard- 
ed by the demands of an authority as a test- 
giver," Finley explains. 

The video also contains unrelated images of 
flags flapping and tree shadows that offer a rare 
and wonderful indulgence in visual pleasure. 
"People assume that visual pleasure is sub- 
servient or not a priority," explains Finley. 
"Within our work, visual pleasure is crucial. To 
take all that you're going through during shoot- 
ing and to look and absorb the visual landscape 
into the piece through the camera is incredibly 
fun and essential to our working process." 

Initial help from a small National 
Endowment for the Arts grant, followed by a 
residency at Xerox Pare and clever manipula- 
tions of Premiere editing programs, allowed 
them to stick to a bare bones budget. Muse says 
hopefully, "If we can get funding, we'd like to 
add a third channel for our narrator, Pamela Z, 
to explore the racialization of voice. We've also 
talked about finding more ways to explore 
video as sculptural medium. And Finley has an 
idea for a fictional feature film on shoplifting. 

"No, not a feature," says Finley. 

"Oh, no. Too commercial." Muse laughs. 



12 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



"Then we wouldn't be real artists!" 

O Night without Objects is distributed 
through Electronic Arts Intermix: (212) 337- 
0680, and Video Data Bank: (312) 345-3550. 

Isabel Sadumi is a San Francisco -based 
writer and filmmaker. 



Cecilia Dougherty 

FAILURE TO ASSIMILATE 

by Lynn Love 




"It's the writers who are the smart ones," 

Cecilia Dougherty recounts when I ask about 
her background and artworld experience. She 
tried writing for awhile before videomaking 
and says writing alone never succeeded for her. 
Of course, one never knows if Dougherty is 
serious or wryly poking fun at a question or 
assumption. This kind of duality exists in many 
of her video works. 

As with any humor, dry as it may be, one 
must take Dougherty's comment at face value 
on some level — especially because she is cur- 
rently documenting writers in her video prac- 
tice. First was Laurie Weeks, a Lower East Side 
author whose work is showcased visually, aural- 
ly, and through oversize subtitling in the tape 
called, simply, Laurie. After Weeks, Dougherty 
taped Leslie Scalapino, a San Francisco-based 
poet reading from her work As: AW Occurrence 
in Structure, Unseen — (Deer Night). Like the 
first tape, Leslie is eponymously titled. Though 
somewhat different in look and tone, the two 
videos share Dougherty's signature shaky, pixe- 



lated, asymmetrically-framed images. The two 
works also hinge on Dougherty's interest, infat- 
uation even, in the showcased artists. As 
Dougherty puts it, "These are highly personal 
impressions, like manifestations of school girl 
crushes. Instead of writing their names all over 
my three -ringed binder, I write them all over 
these tapes." Dougherty has another tape 
planned, of the writer Eileen Myles and possi- 
bly author Joe Westmoreland, each reading 
their work. 

Laurie and Leslie premiered at the 
Threadwaxing Space in Manhattan last fall in 
a retrospective of Dougherty's work curated by 
experimental video artists Elisabeth Subrin and 

Leah Gil- 
liam. The 
three-night 
program 
featured 
nine of 

Dougherty's 
works and 
packed the 
gallery with 
close to 100 
people each 
night. The 
exhibition, 
called "The 
Failure to 
Assimilate: 
The Video 
Works of 
Cecilia 
Dougherty," borrowed the title from another 
recent tape as an apt summary of her experi- 
mental style over her 13-year production 
career. 

With 26 tapes to her credit and persuasive 
critical acclaim from writers such as Judith 
Halberstam and Liz Kotz, Dougherty deserves 
some special recognition for her lesbian femi- 
nist project of documenting the personal and 
intimate in the construction of daily reality. For 
example, Halberstam considers Dougherty's 
work important because she has "forged an aes- 
thetic out of hijacking gay and heterosexual 
visibility and transforming images of homoso- 
cial or homoerotic culture into campy lesbian 
biographies." 

This aesthetic is best seen in Grapefruit, 
Coalminer's Granddaughter, and }oe-]oe, works 
featured in the retrospective. Grapefruit, which 
toured widely after it was released in 1989, is 
an all-lesbian parody of Yoko Ono's lifestyle 
with John Lennon and the Beatles. This work 



was followed in 1 99 1 by the loosely biographi- 
cal Coal Miner's Granddaughter. A growing up 
and coming out story, Coal Miner's 
Granddaughter was not intended to heroicize 
the main character, Jane Dobson, but to 
emphasize that her family is completely normal, 
even though they seem "fucked up." As 
Dougherty explained in interviews about the 
work, "Everybody's story is good. Nothing gets 
resolved." 

In 1993, Dougherty's Joe -Joe playfully chron- 
icled the rise to fame of British playwright and 
homosexual bon vivant Joe Orton. In this tape 
Dougherty cast two lesbians, herself and collab- 
orator Leslie Singer, in the role of Orton. Their 
sharing of Orton's canonized identity chal- 
lenged the virtual invisibility of lesbians in 
queer culture by transcribing Orton's biography 
in lesbian terms. 

My Failure to Assimilate (1995), another tape 
featured in Dougherty's retrospective, contin- 
ues the task of asserting a lesbian aesthetic, but 
with a bittersweet seriousness. The various per- 
sonas in the tape, including Dougherty herself, 
describe their attempts to hold onto their iden- 
tities. But this is a challenging task. For exam- 
ple, Laurie Weeks, appearing in this tape, 
describes her compulsion to write herself a 
"second body" in her partner. In the end of this 
tape, Dougherty describes her break-up with 
her partner and feelings of isolation, the price 
of remaining visible on her own terms. 

When I ask Dougherty about her use of the 
experimental form in video, she cites her formal 
training as a painter as part of the template for 
becoming an experimental video artist. Unlike 
the artist trained in classical cinematic styles, 
Dougherty sees the video frame simply as a flat 
space that must be filled by an adequate com- 
position. In some of her tapes she literally 
frames the images to look like moving paint- 
ings. Often there's no inherent "logic" for the 
sequences and shots we see. They're not cine- 
matically "beautiful." As writer Weeks says in 
the retrospective's catalog, "There are only 
bodies and their effects: desire, loss, and. ..the 
persistence of pain." Though one could visual- 
ly romanticize "bodies and their effects," and 
many do, Dougherty chooses instead to leave 
them stark. In this anti-assimilationist act, 
Dougherty becomes what she seems to admire: 
one of the smart ones. 

Cecelia Doughtery's videotapes are available 
through Video Data Bank: (312) 345-3550. 

Lynn hive is a writer who lives in New York City. 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 13 



www.16x9dtv.com 



ShOOt for the Future 

ibiy UTV is our business 

RQCltdl digital cameras / lights / sound 

tQlt on-line /off-line non-linear 

UK Ot VsfGW 35 features / documentaries ... 
16:9 Broadcast Camera 
w/DP, Lights, Sound ^ Mng grea , ln 43 fof 20 yea rs, 

we're now defying into nDTV 

Produce for the Next Millennium 

Discount, Benefits & Co-prod. Opportunities for our tt-VISON members Call for details 212 334 4778 




Bonjour! Monsieur Thomas Edison at your service. 

Death has not slowed me down. I've recently discovered 

that Hots Shots Cool Cuts has the most fantastique 

International location footage. From Tokyo to Timbuktu 

over 100 hrs. of landmarks, aerials, cityscapes, & culture. 

Around zee world, they've got it all. I heartily recommend 

Hot Shots Cool Cuts for all your international footage needs. 

Vive la stock cinematique internationale!!! 




lT- 



INTERNATIONAL 
CONTEMPORARY 



ARCHIVAL 






M6t $H6f i 

PHONE: (212) 799-9100 
FAXir (212) 799-9258 



The stock footage company whose stock footage doesn't look like stock footage 



G 9 

THE VISION MACHINE 



by Jeremy Lehrer 




Peggy Ahwesh is a cinematic alchemist 

with a penchant for transforming the banal into 
the sublime. A rare combination of technophile 
and mystic, Ahwesh has been making experi- 
mental and avant-garde films and videos since 
the seventies, when she first started shooting 
Super 8 films in Pittsburgh while programming 
for Pittsburgh Filmmakers and working on 
George Romero's films. In her own early films, 
she assembled "a kind of sketchbook of people's 
behaviors in relation to the camera," as she 
describes it; "people always 'sort of performing. 
But somehow some Sisyphean act of perfor- 
mance." 

Based now in New York, Ahwesh continues 
to make thoughtful, inspiring, and richly lay- 
ered films and videos while she nurtures a new 
generation of media artists as an assistant pro- 
fessor at Bard College. In 1997, Ahwesh curat- 
ed her own retrospective for the Whitney 
Museum of American Art, in which she mixed 
her work with other films that provided con- 
text and commentary. Her selection included 
films such as Doris Wishman's Bad Girls Go To 
Hell, Raul Ruiz's On Top of the Whale, and Andy 
Warhol's Lupe. 

Meaningful juxtapositions are one of 
Ahwesh's fortes. In her creative process, 
Ahwesh suggests that juxtapositions and lan- 
guage shape our understanding of the world as 



14 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 




she explores the transcendent power of images. 
"I've been very keen to understand that, I 
think. To harness in images in some ways, so 
they are exact, and also allow them a freedom 
to roam and he excessive," she says. "But if you 
try to control the image too much, the movie is 
rendered inert, because images are flexible. You 
can give them 
multiple read- 
ings: they are not 
as exact as lan- 
guage." 

Ahwesh's intel- 
lectual restless- 
ness is comple- 
mented by her 
ideas about genres 
of filmmaking. 
Evolving from 
feminist criticism 
of porn conven- 
tions, The Dead- 
man, for example, 
is an attempt to 
create a work 
predicated on a 
woman's desire 
and designed to undermine the "male gaze" 
that predominantly defines visual erotica and 
necessitates the "cum shot." This short feature, 
adapted from the French novelist Georges 
Bataille's short story "Le Mort," relates the 
story of a woman who kills her lover and 
embarks on a journey of sexual awakening. The 
"problem" with an erotic film in which a 
woman's desire defines the action is that her 
orgasm can never be seen (or verified) for the 
camera. Which, for Ahwesh, is precisely the 
point. "I think that's the beauty of the film," 
she says. 

In Nocturne, another short feature, which 
played at the 1998 New York Film Festival, 
Ahwesh creates a second narrative that 
explores the world of a woman haunted by the 
memory of her lover and is layered with a com- 
plex commentary about the amorality of nature. 
"I was using a woman as a main character to 
show the inherent violence in relationships 
between lovers," she explains. "A certain 
amorality is involved in sexual relations. And 
trying to flip over the typical terms of horror 
movies, empower the woman and allow her to 
act out. Not that I think that women should go 
out and kill people. 

"You don't want to actually actualize the 
things you see in horror movies, but I think 
they give you a lot of power," she adds. "And I 
think women need more psychic power." 



Ahwesh's works are remarkable in the way 
she captures seemingly improvised and inti- 
mate moments that are in fact carefully script- 
ed. Ahwesh's oeuvre contains numerous exam- 
ples of this ability to recreate spontaneity. 
Strange Weather (1993), a 50-minute Pixel- 
vision collaboration with Margie Strosser about 
a group of crack addicts scoring in Florida, 
seems to be a COPS-style documentary por- 
trait of four misfits. But the piece was actually 
carefully scripted and choreographed, a con- 
scious yet free-form architecture that pervades 
much of Ahwesh's work. Strange Weather, in 
effect, mimics the drug experience by blurring 
the lines between fiction and reality. 

One might almost say that Ahwesh mimics 
nature in the way that the apparent chaos and 
improvisation in her films is shaped by a set of 
very complex rules. Ahwesh doesn't deny the 
decay inherent in nature; she incorporates it 
into her films to uncover the diamond in the 
rough. In The Color of Love, Ahwesh made a 
film out of a decaying segment of a porn film in 
which two women make love to each other 
over the body of an unresponsive naked man. 
The film's emulsion had begun to decompose, 
and Ahwesh slightly manipulated the film to 
produce a stunning palette of color splotches 
(reminiscent of Brakhage). The end result is a 
beautifully layered work that retains a shade of 
its original purpose while also exploring eroti- 
cism, the sacred and profane, and raising ques- 
tions about the immortality of images, all of it 
framed within a scenario in which women's 
desire is the defining dynamic. The three 
films — The Color of Love, Nocturne, and The 
Deadman — have been dubbed "The Deadman 
Trilogy." 

Ahwesh's next project is a science fiction 
feature about virtual reality, role playing, and 
genetic manipulation which she describes as 
"Cronenberg meets costume drama." The film 
will offer up Ahwesh's compelling brew of the- 
ory, viscera, and visual panache. 

With a career defined by discovering the 
rapturous in slices of life, Ahwesh has an 
almost obsessive drive to collect the remnants 
(celluloid and otherwise) of life around her. 
"Maybe most filmmakers are nostalgic," she 
says. "You become very object-savvy, and it's 
almost like magic realism. Everything really 
becomes haunted and attached with human 
cognizance." 

Peggy Ahwesh's videos are available through 
Video Data Bank: (312) 345-3550; her films are 
available through Film-makers' Co-op: (212) 
889-3820. 

Jeremy Lehrer is a freelance writer livmg in New York. 



■■■'■■' ■: ■ ■ ■■'- 



mum 



;H& off line /online 
3eta;i/2 n , 3/4" ' 
r 24 hour access- . 
7x24 tech support 



■Serimless transfer' 
to 16 i track Pro "Tools 

Audio Tiix 







'i'l ', 



• Avid Non-Linear Editing, available in 
both PAL & NTSC tor: 
Short Films/Documentaries/ 
Music Videos & Commercials 

1 Demo Reels 

Post Production 



Video Tape Transfers in all formats , 
including: DV Cam & DVC Pro 

■ International Standards Conversion, 
PAL & SECAM 

1 High Quality Duplication from any 

Source Master 
1 Film to tape Transfer 




ANALOG DIGITAL INTERNATIONAL 

20 East 49th Street, 2nd floor 

New York, NY 1001 7 

Tel: (21 2) 688-51 1 Fax (21 2) 688-5405 

E-MAIL address: adidigital@aol.com 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 15 



IVAL CIRCUIT 



Euro Dollars 
in Demand 

The International 

Documentary Filmfestival 

Amsterdam & Cofinancing Forum 

by Patricia Thomson 



Dozens of Dutch speed skaters with 
awesome quads whip by as I gently 
push a Yankee filmmaker and novice 
skater around the ice track. Though her knees 
are locked and arms outstretched in a con- 
tained panic, we're having a grand time on the 
outskirts of Amsterdam this gray November 
morning, part of a small group taking advantage 
of this social event organized by the 
International Documentary Filmfestival Am- 
sterdam (IDFA). 

A fast pace may be par for the course at this 
ice rink, but the festival itself is a relatively laid- 
back affair. The center of activity is The Baile, 
a stately brick building in the heart of old 
Amsterdam that houses festival headquarters 
upstairs and a vast coffee bar downstairs. The 
rhythm and atmosphere are distinctly 
European. Clouds of cigarette smoke hang 
above overstuffed couches and tables tilled 
with filmmakers who linger for hours over tiny 
cups of espresso, occasionally crossing the 
street to catch a film at the cineplex where 
most of the 188 documentaries are screened. 
Through the festival has grown considerably 
since its first edition 1 1 years ago, now hosting 
1,140 guests and 56,000 audience members, it 
still feels uncluttered and unhurried. 

That can be good or bad, depending on your 
perspective. Besides the films, there's not much 
else on the menu, relatively speaking — just a 
single lunch for directors (competition only), 
nightly receptions hosted by the festival, a 
"Talk of the Day" (sometimes in Dutch), and a 
few seminars. No sponsored parties, no press 
conferences, no breakfast clubs or other ice- 
breakers for invited filmmakers. The light load 
is nice if you want to squeeze in some extracur- 
ricular activities, like a canal tour, a bike ride, a 
visit to the Rijksmuseum, or a "Joris Ivens 



Walking Tour" (all offered by 
the festival). Some enterpris- 
ing filmmakers found their 
way to the ubiquitous coffee 
bars (the kind with hash 
brownies on the menu) or the 
world-famous red light district 
(just to look, of course). 

But some felt as if the festi- 
val had brought them over, 
then left them adrift. "I'm not 
sure what I should be doing," 
Susan Koch admitted after a packed screening 
of City at Peace, her powerful documentary on 
race relations among youth enrolled in a Wash- 
ington, DC, drama program. Since she and 
coproducer Christopher Koch had already sold 
the film to HBO and had a foreign sales agent 
working the festival, she could coast. But Koch 
had the sense that she was squandering a gold- 
en opportunity. For 100 paces away, dozens of 
Europe's top commissioning editors were holed 
up for the simultaneous three-day Forum for 
International Cofinancing of Documentaries, 
and she had no good way to meet them. Unlike, 
say, Toronto or Sundance, where everyone rubs 
shoulders, IDFA and the Forum are neatly 
divided. And as nice as it is to watch films from 
around the world and visit the Rembrandts, the 
real action is across the street at the Forum, 
Europe's most significant open pitch session. 




"Q 



FF WE GO, SAYS MODERATOR AND 
foreign sales agent Jan Rofekamp in a chipper 
voice. All eyes swivel towards the producer fid- 
geting in his chair, who has seven fleeting min- 
utes to work wonders and convince the assem- 
bled broadcasters to put up some coproduction 



money. And so, as happens 20 times per day, 
the two dozen commissioning editors at the 
table and 100 accredited observers listen to a 
pitch — on punk rockers in Berlin, on the lover 
of Carl Jung, the closing of a hospital in France, 
the lottery in Ireland. Many present footage, 
some are persuasive speakers, but a surprising 
number drone on with zero energy. The editors 
struggle to stay focused; there are, after all, 65 
pitches over the course of three days, and 
they're expected to respond. 

Time is up; the gavel comes down. "Okay," 
says Rofekamp briskly, "who wants to be part of 
this?" And 'round the table he goes for the next 
seven minutes — prodding and cajoling the edi- 
tors each in turn, trying to piece together a 
package of coproduction money and presales. 
("We are allies of the producers," he later says 
of the six moderators' role.) 

Sometimes the end result is a dozen ways to 
say no: "It doesn't fit into any format." 
"Where's the storyline?" "What about this out- 
rageous budget?" "We've just done something 
on the topic." "It's not new territory; what's 
your news?" 

But dead beats are frowned on. The Forum 
is, after all, supposed to be a two-way street, 
since editors need programs to fill their slots as 



16 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



Festival Picks 



During its eight-day stretch (Nov. 26-Dec. 3), IDFA offered 
a wide variety of documentaries from around the world. 
Many are odd lengths — 37:00, 12:00 — which, unfortu- 
nately, lessens their chances of being seen on U.S. televi- 
sion or in certain festivals. But as IDFA shows, gems 
come in all sizes. The following are a few highlights. 



In post-war Italy, the three siblings of Pia were put up for 
adoption by their widowed father. Nearly 50 years later, 
she tries to trace them with the help of her nephew, film- 
maker Basile Sallustio. We follow Pia as she goes up the 
chain of the Catholic charity that served as go-between 
and faces stonewalling, lies, and her own mounting 
despair. A moving and ultimately satisfying film. 

With the best of intentions, a motley trio brings the cheesy 
sex and wholesale violence of Indian cinema to the 
remotest regions with a mobile cinema — one of 2,000 
crisscrossing the country. While some audiences are fix- 
ated, the most primitive tribe walks out during the open- 
ing action scene. "Don't come back," they politely request 
the next day. "We have a bellyache now." 

Moviemaking of another sort is the subject of this histor- 
ical documentary by American filmmaker Michael 
Epstein. The film examines the seven-year collaboration 
between producer David Selznick (Gone with the Wind) 
and the rising British director he imported, Alfred 
Hitchcock. This double portrait offers an in-depth look at 
the Hollywood studio system in the thirties and the strug- 
gle between producer and director for creative power. 

It's hard to fathom life much harder than that depicted in 
this observational doc, a festival prize-winner, by Sergey 
Dvortsevoy. Once a week, a railway car containing loaves 
of bread is delivered to a spot several miles from a dying 
village in Russia, where a few elderly people remain. They 
push the railway car the rest of the way in the bitter cold, 
then bicker over rations. The scenes of humans and ani- 
mals scratching out an existence in this inhospitable 
clime are finely etched and enduring. 

Not since Small Happiness has a documentary so effec- 
tively shown the sorry status of women in a third world 
country. Shot (beautifully) in India by Debananda 
Sengupta, this understated 36-minute film presents the 
ambitions and expectations of several pubescent girls, 
versus those of their families. 

On a related subject, this documentary was one of the few 
to get festival buzz. Kim Longinott and Ziba Mir-Hossseini 
follow three lawsuits in Teheran filed by women who buck 
the system and are willing to face ostracization and the 
potential loss of their children and savings as a result. 





Tape-to-Film Transfers... 

Call Film Craft. Our Teledyne CTR-3 uses high-grade precision optics 
and pin-registration for a rock-steady transfer and superior results. 



1 A FEW OF OUR SATISFIED CLIENTS INCLUDE: 


Lynn Hershman "Virtual Love" 


Laurel Chiten "Twitch and Shout" 


Jane Gillooly "Leona's Sister Gerri" 




Heather MacDonald "Ballot Measure 9" 


Outsider Productions "Sex Is" 




We offer a two-minute MOS 16mm color demo at no charge from 
your videotape. 



FfWi Processing & Printing.., 

We've been processing and printing motion picture film for over 
25 years, so we understand the challenges of the independent 
filmmaker. We're a full-service film laboratory and one of the few 
labs that still processes black & white film. 



FOR PROFESSIONAL LAB SERVICES, CALL US FIRST. 



Daily Processing 



Black & White Processing and Printing-- 16mm and 35mm 

Color Processingand Printing- 1 6mm and 35mm 

Cam era Raw Stocks 

Ran k/da Vinci Film-to-Tape Transfer 



l/l/e offer special student rates. 



FILM 



23815 Industrial Park Drive ■ Farmmgton Hills, 
Voice: 248.474.3900 ■ Fax: 248.474.1577 

Film Craft Lab, a division of Grace & Wild, Inc. 



48335 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 17 



TIVAL CrUCTJTT 



much as producers need financing. "I'm not 
sure if I should sit at the table, since I have so 
little money to spend," whispered one consci- 
entious Scandinavian editor to a colleague dur- 
ing a break. It's true that some of the smaller 
countries bring only pocket change. Last year, 
for instance, AVRO (Netherlands), TV 2 
Norway, SVT (Sweden) , and TV Ontario each 
invested only 5,000 to 10,000 ECUs over the 
course of three days. (All figures in this article 
given in ECUs. The exchange rate for 1 ECU at 
the time of Forum was $1.13.) But coalitions 
form, and small sums add up. The high end is 
represented by the BBC, which poneyed up 
more than 200,000 in 1997; Channel 4/UK 
(100,000 - 150,000); and VPRO (Netherlands) 
and Arte (France) (50,000 - 100,000 each). 

Ultimately, some producers come away 
happy. Last year, 44% of projects secured addi- 
tional financing, with an average of 56,742 
ECUs invested per project, according to the 



Decades after the 
fact, an Italian 
woman searches for 
her siblings, sold for 
adoption, in festival 
favorite My Brother, 
My Sister Sold for a 
Fistful of Lire. 



broadcaster, film board, or 
film institute. What's more, 
that partner must be there at 
the table beside you — no 
small disadvantage for U.S. 
producers who might have 
only a local public television 
station (with a limited travel 
budget) committed to the 
project. 

It also helps to be 
European. The Forum is 
paid for by the European 
Commission's MEDIA Programme, so 85 per- 
cent of the pitches are reserved for EC produc- 
tions. (Three years ago, it was 100 percent 
European.) But when a Canadian producer 
urged them to raise the non-EC quota during 
the evaluation discussion, his suggestion was 
quickly knocked down. "You can do a North 
American version," said the BBC's Nicholas 
Fraser. "This was funded by MEDIA." Added 
Forum chief 

Jolanda Klaren- 
beek, "So please 
don't promote it 
over there." (Too 
ate. 

But even if you 
aren't one of the 
elite picked to 
pitch, there are 
three good rea- 
sons to attend as 
one of the accre- 
dited observers. 



Last year, 44% 

of projects secured 

additional financing, 

with an average of 

56,742 ECUs invested 

per project. 




Forum's figures. Pre-sales accounted for 
69% of this financing, coproduction 8%, 
and a combination of investment and pre- 
sales 23%. 

It can be hard to predict what will sell. 
An Icelandic production company called 
20 Goats pitched a film on the local tradi- 
tion of documenting the dead in photo- 
graphic portraits. "It's hard to look at," said 
one queasy editor. But moments later came 
an easy sale: "We're planning a theme night 
on funerals, so we would be interested," 
said Olaf Grunert from ZDF/Arte. Who 
would have guessed? 

To earn a place at this table, filmmakers 
must have at least 25 percent of their bud- 
get lined up, plus the commitment of a 



Outsized power struggles 
in 1930s Hollywood are 
revealed in Hitchcock, 
Selznick, and the End of 
Hollywood. 



The first is the "Moderator's 
Hat." Any producer in the 
room can throw his or her 
business card into a hat, and 
three times per day the mod- 
erator draws out a name. 
That person gets to pitch, 
then and there. Two years 
ago, Mark Gevisser, a South 
African journalist, was one 
of those lucky ones, and this 
year the resulting film he 
produced with director 
Greta Schiller, The Man Who Drove with 
Mandela, was in the film competition at IFDA, 
coming full circle. AVRO was one of the chan- 
nels to pony up money as a result of Gevisser's 
impromptu presentation. "He was so full of 
energy and drive," recalls AVRO commission- 
ing editor Marijke Rawie. "It was the best pitch 
of the day." 

The second reason to attend is because the 
Forum will help arrange one-on-one meetings 
with editors when they are not at the table. 
(The 83 commissioning editors from 54 chan- 
nels rotate during the three-day period.) There 
are four official consultants who point produc- 
ers towards the appropriate people and some- 
times make introductions. Tracy Holder, copro- 
ducer of an American Masters biography of the- 
ater producer Joseph Papp, managed to get 
meetings with editors from NPS (Netherlands), 
Canal Plus, SBS (Australia), ZDF/Arte, BBC, 
and PBS. She concluded that the Forum is not 
the best place to bring an arts-related project, 
but felt her time there had been worthwhile. 
"The Forum can pay off in the long-run. It's 
good for making contacts, but not necessarily 
for making immediate sales," she says. 

And that's the third compelling reason to 
buy that plane ticket to Amsterdam. With so 
many editors gathered under one roof, it's a fab- 
ulous and efficient way to attach names to 
faces, glean a sense of programming strands, 
and begin to become acquainted with the small 
but very complex world of European television 
coproduction. Attrition among commissioning 
editors is relatively low in Europe, so acquain- 
tances made one year can be renewed and 
strengthened the next. Thus are relationships 
built. And that's what this game all about. As 
Rofekamp advised the gathered filmmakers, 
"Coproduction is like sex. It's always great if 
you're friends." 

Patricia Thomson is editor in chief 
of The Independent. 



18 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



Pitching Lessons 

Five pointers to keep in mind when perfecting 
your pitch on the international playing field. 



JL The Pitch: A Good Day to Die: The True Story of the 
Battle of the Little Bighorn intends to "explode the myth" of 
Custer's Last Stand. This intriguing Discovery Channel film 
proposed to do so by drawing on forensic science and newly 
discovered papers of photographer Edward Curtis that contain 
first-hand accounts of the massacre from surviving Indian 
scouts. Producer Andre Singer was asking for one third of the 
hour-long project's 326,279 ECU budget. 

The Response: One commissioning editor ventured to say 
that the subject was "too American" for his viewers. To this 
Singer replied, "One would not say something on ancient Egypt 
is too Egyptian." 

The Lesson: Be prepared to argue — credibly and convinc- 
ingly — that your film is able to travel across borders and cul- 
tures. For herein lies the rub of international coproduction. 
Viewers prefer programming with a national hook, but produc- 
tion costs often necessitate several countries partnering up. 
Commissioning editors have to reconcile these competing 
demands. 



2 



The Pitch: Waving a gas mask issued by the Israeli gov- 
ernment, producer Nir Toil pitched The Arrow Project, an hour- 
long video that examines Israel's version of Star Wars — an 
anti-missile missile that is supposed to defend the country 
against nuclear attack. BBC is in for 25%; the producer was 
looking for the balance of his 172,413 ECU budget. 

The Response: Among the interested parties was PBS's 
Glen Marcus, who said it sounded right for the Frontline series. 
"It's a logical follow-up to something they did on the Gulf War." 

The Lesson: "Yes" can mean many things at the Forum. 
It's important to know who's talking and how much power he 
or she has to greenlight a project. Does Marcus know for sure 
tha{ Frontline executive producer David Fanning will want The 
Arrow Project! When there are layers of bureaucracy, as at 
PBS, it's best not to count your chickens before they hatch. But 
if it's someone with authority from a smaller channel (like 
Jean-Francoise Dion from Multithematiquest/Planete cable) or 
the big cheese from a larger one (like Thierry Garrel from La 
Sept/Arte), then you're cooking. 



3 



The Pitch: One of the Moderator's Hat picks was a film 
on the Armenian genocide of 1915. It's a rare topic for docu- 
mentaries, in part because no film footage exists. But the 
director has located a number of survivors, now aged 98 to 
112, whose oral histories will form the basis of this film. 

The Response: The project received a warm reception, 
with commissioning editors recognizing the now-or-never 
aspect. Where they had reservations was with the 4 x 26:00 
format. "No one will buy short series," cautioned the BBC's 



: hurr\ann 



lasp 

isan Inberg t- 




Coffee and commerce in Amsterdam. 



Nicholas Fraser, who recommended that the producer consid- 
er restructuring it as two 50:00 programs. 

The Lesson: If a buyer is interested enough, be willing to 
adjust your length. While the trend is toward hour-long slots, 
it's not universal. ZDF indicated that they might have a place 
for a clown-rodeo project that U.S. producer Jonathan Stack 
was pitching if he came up with a half-hour version. 



• The Pitch: The Man from Red October will be the real- 
life story of the Soviet nuclear submarine captain and turncoat 
who was the prototype for Sean Connery's character in The 
Hunt for Red October The Lithuanian producer was asking for 
96,000 ECUs towards her 129,000 budget for this 52:00 film. 
"It's a story of spies and love, with a Hollywood film and Sean 
Connery. It sounds like it should have a broad audience," 
coaxed the moderator when seguing to discussion. 

The Response: "Your budget is what?!?" No one believed 
Hollywood clips could be secured for this amount. "Fair use is 
okay in the U.S.," said Garrel, "but we can be sued in Europe." 
The producer couldn't respond, as she hadn't yet investigated 
licensing costs. Nor had she approached the press-shy 
Connery about appearing in the film. The result: editors stayed 
away. 

The Lesson: Do your homework and bring a realistic bud- 
get. Be prepared to detail what archival or licensed footage 
you'll be using and what it costs. If you don't know, it'll show. 



U The Pitch: A Modern Pied Piper is a light-hearted look 
at the world's leading rat catcher, the colorful self-made mil- 
lionaire Massimo Donadon. Using a tongue-in-cheek parody of 
war reporting, this documentary shows the exterminator's bat- 
tle plan, his weapons (poison that takes into account rats' 
acquired tastes, like butter in France, pork fat in Germany, 
margarine in the U.S., and curry in Bombay), and the clash in 
the field. The producer was seeking 75 percent of his 200,000 
ECU budget. 

The Response: Editors loved it, as well as an earlier pitch 
from the same producer, Carlo Cresto-Oina, on the tomato as 
symbol of Italian national identity. 

The Lesson: Humor sells. "We lack happy, optimistic sub- 
jects," complained Planete's Dion, one of several editors who 
openly craved a lighter touch. "The next channel I'm going to 
propose to my boss is the Genocide Channel." — PT 



NO 
ENTRY 

(Fees, that is) 

WYBE Public Television in Philadelphia 
seeks works up to 56 minutes for 
THROUGH THE LENS, an award-winning 
weekly series showcasing innovative film 
and video from around the world. 

NO ENTRY FEE 

ACQUISITION FEE: $25 PER MINUTE 

ALL STYLES AND GENRES 
WELCOME 



Submission deadline April 20, 1 999 



For an application: 



WYBE Public Television 
attn: Carl Lee, TTL 
6070 Ridge Avenue 
Philadelphia PA 19128 
(215)483-3900 

email: ttl@wybe.pbs.org 



or visit www.wybe.org and follow the links 
to a printable application. 




•© 



we'll take you there 




miOOKlDMO THtSOUl OF THE CJUKIRM OPtRttTOR 
MDSAWTHEGUMCMV-8. 




1-800-949-2089 or 1-508-866-2199 

or reach us on the internet at www.glidecam.com 



Glidecam is Registered at the Patent and TM Office 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 19 



IVAL CIRCUIT 



Satantic Worship i 



in London! 




Where, you're asking, is 
Pandaemonium? Way back in 
1667 John Milton, the poet- 
explorer of heaven and hell, 
wrote an original iambic pen- 
tameter indie screenplay on 
the place: 



A solemn Councel forthwith to be held 

At Pandaemonium, the high Capital of Satan 

and his Peers. 

Centuries later, still in London, the current 
abode of all sorts ot demons, happened the sec- 
ond coming of Pandaemonium (October 15- 
23), billed as the city's biannual Festival of the 
Moving Image. It is a devilish set of events: film 
and video screenings, installations, artist per- 
formances, public art, interactive arts, digital 
salon, sound and music performances, night- 
club projections, panels. When you look at the 
schedule, you're a bit bewildered at first. You 
ought to be. The whole point of a festival is: too 
much. 

But what Pandaemonium represents is an 
emergent new structure for festivals, paralleled 
by the World Wide Video Festival, now in 
Amsterdam, and the European Media Art 
Festival in Osnabriick, among others. What 
these festivals have in common is a receptivity 
to new forms and an intention to try out newer 
contexts. Their viewers are equally likely to be 
participants — particularly in digital, computer- 
based media. As Pandaemonium's artistic 
director, Michael Maziere, says, "The rigid tra- 



ditions of 'experimental/underground' him, the 
purity ot 'video art,' and the increasingly ques- 
tionable definition ot 'new media' are all being 
challenged by a fresh and distinctively irrever- 
ent approach by contemporary artists. But 
where does that leave us?" 

Pandaemonium was less an answer to that 
question than an extremely energetic account 
of the search — a determination to mix it up. 
The physical center for all that energy was the 
new Lux Centre in Hoxton Square, a rapidly 
gentrifying part ot London's East End that 
resembles New York's Soho in the late seven- 
ties. The Lux is itself an ensemble: London 
Electronic Arts; the London Film-makers Co- 
op; the LEA Gallery, in which five media works 
commissioned for the festival were shown; and 
the Lux Theatre, in which films and single - 
channel videos were screened. Nearby, three 
othet galleries presented a range ot digital and 
audio media works — and were filled with avid 
users when I visited them. One night the Tate 
Gallery of Modern Art allowed their new site at 
the Bankside Power Station on the Thames to 
be used as an outdoor screen for projections of 
films about building sites and industrial zones, 
an irresistibly brilliant idea. 

When you approached the Lux at night, 
there was usually a spillover of festival partici- 
pants hanging out at the bar that had just 
opened the previous week. Above the bar, on 
the second floor, there was a three-screen rear- 
projection loop of a dreamy Tracey Emin piece, 
Sundown, of her slow-roaming on horseback the 
yellow-orange Margate seashore. Stepping 



inside the theater you also stepped on video 
monitors that are embedded into the floor and 
are usually the site of an installation, which 
simultaneously plays on screens behind the 
box office. Another large monitor displayed an 
on-going video diary of the festival by Louise 
Camrass. Since that lobby was generally filled 
with people, a proper atmosphere of sensory 
overload was well-maintained. 

Single-screen curator Abina Manning tire- 
lessly looked at 800 film and video entries, 
selecting 100 for 14 programs, with the 
emphasis on London, UK, or world premieres. 
Such a plethora tended to favor shorter, more 
experimental work rather than either conven- 
tional documentary or narrative pieces — or 
longer works of any genre. In addition (as if 
that wasn't enough), there were special pro- 
grams dedicated to Daniel Reeves and Kurt 
Kren, plus a series of guest-curated programs. 
Lori Zippay of Electronic Arts Intermix put 
together a slate of super 8 and 16mm perfor- 
mance films by conceptual artists ot the sev- 
enties. Kate Horsfield of Video Data Bank 
showed a group of recent dystopian videos that 
was capped by Leslie Thornton's post-apocalyp- 
tic Peggy and Fred in Kansas which, a decade 
after it was made, still looks 10 years ahead of 
its time. Gavin Smith arrived with a selection 
that he'd made with Mark McElhatten, titled 
"Ceiling Zero," of films that dare to take off, 
despite "perilous flight conditions," venturing 
into tough territory both atmospherically and 
in terms of content. Peggy Ahwesh's bracing 
Nocturne provided one of the appropriately 
dark moments in this program. Other pre- 
mieres from the U.S. included Sadie Benning's 
Flat Is Beautiful and Joan Braderman and Dana 
Mastet's hot-off-the-Avid Video Bites. 

One unfortunate side effect ot the wall-to- 
wall programming of so much work was the 
lack of a chance for attending makers and audi- 
ences to participate in Q&As — which can be 
so rewarding when audiences are as savvy as 
they tend to be at festivals. However, in so 
many other informal ways, such communica- 
tion inevitably occurred, not least in the bar 
next door, which somehow didn't have a single 
video monitor or terminal display visible. Just 
people talking and drinking like demons, much 
as I understand they did back in 1667. 

Ernest Larsen 

Ernest Larsen's videotape Throwaway, coproduced with 
Sherry Mdlner, premiered at the Pandaemrmium festival. 



20 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



High Impact 



IDA's DocCom3 



in the next century — at least that was the 

intent of IDA executive director Betsy 

McLane. A film historian, McLane selected 

clips from 14 films, including Night and Fog; 

Hiroshima-Nagasaki, August 1945; The War at 

Home; Triumph of 

the Will; Hearts 

and Minds; and 1/ 




The presentation was called "Docs that 

Shook the World." But the truth is that the 
world still shakes in the face of footage from the 
Nazi concentration camps, the carnal catastro- 
phe in Hiroshima, and the campus head-bash- 
ing of the 1960s. 

While the expressed purpose of the 
International Documentary Association's 
(IDA) "Docs that Shook the World" was to 
prove that documentaries can make a differ- 
ence, the program made even more clear the 
critical importance documentary films hold to 
the preservation of history and memory, their 
timeless power to make us pause in horror and 
awe. 

The program was just one of three days' 
worth of presentations and panels organized 
during the third annual IDA Congress, held in 
late October in Los Angeles. Called DocCon3, 
the congress also included sessions on the nuts 
and bolts of documentary production ("Getting 
Started in a Documentary Career in the U.S.," 
"Model Pitches"), popular forms ("Reality 
Bites/True TV," "Docs Rock"), and new tech- 
nologies ("New Media — Documentaries 
Beyond Television and Film"). 

Particular emphasis this year was placed on 
worldwide developments, with a special series 
zeroing in on the Pacific Rim, Eastern Europe, 
China, Latin America, and Israel, as well as ses- 
sions on "Documentary Film Festivals outside 
the U.S." and "EU and NAFTA— Docu- 
mentary Coproduction Allies?" 

"Docs that Shook the World," while superfi- 
cially looking back in time, posed a chance to 
assess what the 100-year-old medium will mean 



You Love This 
Planet: Dr. Helen 
Caldicott on Nu- 
clear War. McLane 
also invited a 
number of com- 
mentators, pri- 
marily filmmakers, 
to share their thoughts on the assembled clips. 
George Stevens, Jr., son of the celebrated 
Hollywood director (The Diary of Anne Frank, 
A Place in the Sun), contrasted his father's 
Hollywood successes to the quiet power of doc- 
umentary, noting that Stevens, Sr.'s most 
important work may well have been "the simple 
uninflected images" of Dachau, where he was 
sent as head of combat photography during 
World War II. 

Rabbi Marvin Hier, a documentary producer 
and dean/founder of the Simon Wiesenthal 
Center and the Museum of Tolerance, noted 
that the footage of the Nazi camps forever 
deprives future generations of denying that the 
Holocaust really happened. 

But forever is only as good as the film stock, 
McLane learned when she went to look for a 
print of Hearts arid Minds, an influential anti- 
war film from 1974- She found two. Both had 
aged badly. 

Approaching the topic not as a filmmaker or 
historian but as a politician, former Canadian 
Prime Minister Kim Campbell extolled docu- 
mentary's power to "take policy out of the 
abstract, to remind us that public policy has 
flesh and blood ramifications." She added: "My 
only concern is that many of our most impor- 
tant issues aren't cinematic." 

Seizing on the idea, McLane linked it to the 
presentation's larger purpose: "Maybe that's the 
challenge for documentary in the next century." 

Barbara Bliss Osborn 

Barbara Bliss Osbom is a radio producer for the 

Pacifica station in Los Angeles and a doctoral student in 

communications at L/C San Diego. 



212*252*3522 

AVID 

Media Composers 

• Film Negative Matchback 

• AVR77 

• 3D-DVE effects 

• 92 GIGS storage 

• Protools sound mix 
Transfers / Duplication 
Camera Pkgs / Animation 
Graphics / AVID Classes 



FILM SCHiiL 

with Dov S-S Simens 



Learn to 




Produce, 




Direct and 


■"■^^KT^ 


Distribute a 


j*y2 EL m 


Feature Film 




in one 


iEr" *■ J 


weekend! 


^^r d'^ " 


LOSAiN 


IGELES 


Mar 6-7. Apr 24-25 or May 23-24 


WORLE 


)TOUR 



NEW YORK: Mar 13-14 

PHOENIX: Mar 27-28 

GHANA: Apr 17-18 

DENVER: May 15-16 

WASHINGTON, DC: May 29-30 



Leant at Home! 

Audio Film School™ Available 




http://HollywoodU.com 

HFI, Inc., PO Box 481252, LA, CA 90048 



either only 

$289 



HOLLYWOOD 



800-366-3456 M 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 21 




Long May It Run 



New York's Shorts Expo 



With the explosion of film festivals and 

the growing interest in shorts, the International 
Expo of Short Film & Video remains the 
protype for the short film festival. As the 
nation's longest-running annual festival for 
shorts, the 32-year-old Expo, founded in 1966 
by Nick Manning, established its reputation 
with the exhibition of early works by Spike Lee, 
Martha Coolidge, Claude Lelouche, the 
Maysles brothers, Michael Snow, and Agnes 
Varda. The Expo's mission — to support, pro- 
mote, and encourage interest in the art of short 
film and video — was carried through with 
amazing sincerity through this year's five-day 
run of packed screenings at Manhattan's New 
School. 

With overall attendance up 34 percent from 
last year, the Expo kicked off with select screen- 
ings from each category — animation, experi- 
mental, documentary, fiction, and new 
media — and speeches from key festival organiz- 
ers. Their commentaries, highlighting the 
integrity ot their target filmmakers, are the kind 
that make you feel all warm and gushy about 
being a member of the indie community. 

From 650 entries, the majority of finalists 
were American, Canadian, Austrian, and 
Russian (especially in the animation category) 
and cover a wide range of independent film- 
makers: from film school students and profes- 
sors to veteran filmmakers. Memorable titles to 
look out for include Human Remains (Doc. 
Silver), The Morphology of Desire, 17 Days to 
Earth (Fiction Silver), and The Fetishist (tie for 
Animation Gold). 

With this range of entrants in mind, the 



Expo has 
developed 
creative ways 
to acknowl- 
edge the best 
of its entries. 
This year's 
additions 
included Best 
Debut in all 
categories 
(except short 
narrative, in 
which all 
were debuts) 
and sub- 

genre awards 
in the doc 
category for 
^a^^^^^^^^B Best Personal, 

Experimen- 
tal, and Verite styles. Additional prizes ranged 
from two $500 Kodak film stock awards, a $500 
Barbizon Lighting Award, Open 1 Media digital 
editing courses, and a Sync Sound digital 
touch-up. 

Attracted by networking opportunities and 
panels on "Directions in New Media" and "Film 
Preservation for Independents," attendance 
among the finalists was high. With support 
from Bravo, MTV, William Morris, Good 
Machine, Women Make Movies, the Museum 
of Modern Art, WNET, Women in Film, SKYY 
Vodka, and Kodak in the way of judges, grants, 
and sponsorship, the Expo provided a balanced 
environment for filmmakers to display their 
industry- calling cards and labors of love. 

This year, Anne Borin, film editor and for- 
mer U.S Coordinator for the International St. 
Petersburg Film Fest, replaced five-year veteran 
Robert Withers as executive director and 
brought on an army of committed volunteers. 
Now that Borin has settled into her new posi- 
tion, she's already accepting entries for next 
year's summer deadline and has future plans for 
improving the festival. "For next year, we are 
looking to concentrate on outreach programs 
to more festivals and distributors worldwide to 
increase new media entries as well as knowl- 
edge of the Expo in Asia." 

For more info, contact: New York Expo, 512 La 
Guardia Place, Suite 110, NY, NY 10012; (212) 
505-7742; nyexpo&r aol.com; www.yrd.com/ 
nyexpo. 

Gesha-Marie Bryant 

Gesha-Mane Bryam is an mterm at The Independent. 



Oopa 



i 



The Thessaloniki 
International Film Festival 



When Anthony Bregman, head of produc- 

tion for the New York-based independent pro- 
duction company Good Machine, participated 
in a panel on digital video at the Thessaloniki 
International Film Festival last year, he was 
taken aback by the audience's raucous 
response. "The focus of most filmmakers at 
these kinds of panels is 'How can I get my film 
made?' or 'Will Good Machine read my script?' " 
In Thessaloniki, "people were storming in and 
out, yelling at us, accusing us of the death of 
cinema. One of my fellow panelists stood up in 
the middle of all this and unfurled a manifesto 
about young Greek cinema vs. old Greek cine- 
ma. ... It felt like 1968 or something." 
Welcome to Thessaloniki. 

Although this year's festival spotlight on 
Good Machine was less dramatic, the discus- 
sion was no less intense as the standing-room 
only crowd engaged in heartfelt debates with 
Bregman and Good Machine co-founder Ted 
Hope, as well as American indie filmmakers 
Hilary Brougher (The Sticky Fingers of Time) 
and John O'Hagan (Wonderland) about the ups 
and downs of producing and distributing inde- 
pendent films. But it is not just Good Machine 
stirring up the masses. Enthusiastic exchanges 
about cinema and its future are typical fare dur- 
ing the festival's 10-day run in mid-November, 
as the buzz in the theaters, cafes, and ouzo bars 
can attest. With screenings of over 160 films 
from more than 35 countries, Thessaloniki has 
become a haven for cinephiles, drawing 62,000 
viewers to the festival's seven theater venues 
this season. (A selection of the festival's Greek 
and Balkan films will be screened at Anthology 
Film Archives in New York City April 30 - May 
6.) 

Unlike premiere film festivals such as Berlin, 
Cannes, and Venice, which are as much about 
glamour and Hollywood as they are about film, 
the Thessaloniki festival has distinguished itself 
by promoting alternative, unconventional 
works by mostly young independent directors 
(the international competition section is open 
to first and second features only). Festival 
director Michel Demopoulos believes it is 
important to move beyond the "monotony of 
the major studios" to insure that a vibrant, cre- 



22 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 




ative cinema can continue to flourish in a cul- 
tural environment of ever-expanding homo- 
geneity. Having defined the festival as a kind of 
cinematic oasis, Demopoulos views the festi- 
val's mission as one that is "duty bound to 
attack the fetters imposed on film, to promote 
new forms of cinematic expression, and to 
shape viewers capable of supporting film cul- 
ture." 

Echoing Demopoulos's sentiments is Dimitri 
Eipides, programmer for the New Horizons sec- 
tion of the festival, who seeks films that are 
"marked by their originality." It was through 
New Horizons that the works of directors such 
as Hal Hartley and Atom Egoyan were intro- 
duced to Greek audiences. (Eipides will head 
up a new documentary festival, also based in 
Thessaloniki, in March 1999.) 

Emphasizing as it does the artistic, rather 
than the market, side of film and filmmaking, 
the festival ambiance is one of openness and 
hospitality. Organizers go a long way in trying 
to accommodate the needs of filmmakers and 
journalists, including providing airfare and 
hotel to most attendees, as well as a press room 
replete with computers, phones, faxes, email 
access, and individual mail boxes that are 
stuffed daily with information. Additionally, 
the festival hosts several luncheons, dinners, 
and parties where people have the opportunity 
to meet, talk, and sample some delicious Greek 
food. And the lovely port city of Thessaloniki, 
with its university, Byzantine churches and 
ruins, and cafe-lined waterfront, is great place 
to spend time and watch films. 

"The Thessaloniki festival had all the 
advantages of a major international festival, 
like Rotterdam, especially in terms of its selec- 
tion of films, but without the 'meat market' 
atmosphere of a bigger, more commercial 
event," says Brougher. "I was able to meet a lot 
of writers and filmmakers, particularly from 
Eastern Europe. And it was great to see films 
with such spirited audiences; it really felt like 
this festival was very much loved." 

Cleo Cacoulidis 

Cleo Cacoulidis is a freelance journalist 
living in New York City 



t.He for 

of rEnTiNg. 



AVID RENTALS 



MC 8000-1000-400 

PRO-TOOLS 

DVC PRO-DECK 



EXCELLENT TECH SUPPORT 



(productions) 

212.741.9155 



International Insurance Brokers Inc. 

Discounted 

Liability 

Insurance 

for 
AIVF Members 



Suite 500 | 
20 Vesey Street j 
New York City,NY 
10007-2966 
Tel: 800-257-0883 
212-406-4499 
Fax:212-406-7588 f 
E-Mail: staff@csins.com 
http://www.csins.com 1 



AVW PRICES 
KJtUNO YOU? 

Come to RADICAL AVID for 
the LOWEST PRICES in New York! 

RAJH&M.AyiD 




1133 Broadway at 26th Street 
(212) 633-7497 



All Systems MC 7.0 PCI 
Off Line/On Line /AVR 77 



Spacious 24 Hr. Editing Suites 

• Dubs to and from DV, miniDV, Beta, 3/4, VHS w/tc windows 

• Highest Quality COMPONENT In/Output DV and miniDV 

• Batch digitize directly from DV and miniDV 

No More Beta Bump-Ups! 



DV • miniDV • DV • miniDV • DV • miniDV • DV 




March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 23 




y Robert L. Seigel 



Balancing the Books 

When to Audit Your Distributor 



MAGINE THIS: AFTER SLAVING AWAY ON 
your independent project, you finally 
sign with a sales agent or a distributor. 
Months go by with no word and no 
check. Finally you get a "Producer's 
Report" with a statement indicating 
that your micro -budgeted masterpiece 
has generated a significant amount of 
revenue. However, by the time you 
reach the end of the statement, there is 
a minuscule or even a negative figure in 
the column labeled "Net Profits Paid to 
Producer." You feel you've been ripped oft and 
are ready to call your attorney. 

This scenario is all too typical. Unfor- 
tunately, many mediamakers contact their 
lawyers after they've signed a contract. All may 
not be lost, however, since often there appears 
something called an "audit provision." This 
permits you to examine a sales agent's or dis- 
tributor's books and records pertaining to your 
project upon a written notice. But even if your 
contract includes an audit provision, you have 
to address a more troublesome, pragmatic ques- 
tion: Should you exercise that right to audit? It 
can cost you — up to thousands of dollars. 

This creates a financial Catch 22: in order to 
determine whether the cost of an audit is justi- 
fied, you first have to proceed with the audit. 
However, there are some steps you can under- 
take in making this decision. 

Roberta Hrdy is an "investigative auditor" 
— a certified public accountant who has audit- 
ed the books and records of countless sales 
agents, distributors, and producers in the 
motion picture, television, video, and music 
fields. According to Hrdy, the cost of an audit is 
"not cheap." As she explains, "The cost is hard 
to say, because it will depend on a project's 
activity: how many years will the audit cover, in 
what kind of markets the project has been dis- 
tributed, whether a distributor used sub-distrib- 
utors, and the level of expenditures a distribu- 
tor has incurred on behalf of the project." 

In assessing the cost of an audit, Hrdy 
requests that a potential client submit all state- 
ments rendered by a sales agent or a distributor 
as well as copies of all licensing agreements, 



including the contract with 
the sales agent/distributor. In 
this agreement, a mediamaker 
should demand during con- 
tract negotiations that there 
should be a provision in which 
a mediamaker has a right to 
copies of the sub-distribution 
agreements. 

"There was an animation 
film in which the distributor 
licensed television and video 
rights, and the video deal was 
a sub-license in which the sub- 
licensee paid a guarantee," 
Hrdy illustrates. "When you 
do an audit, you should see the 
licenses since they show the 
percentages that a distributor 
would be entitled to and how 
much of an advance or guar- 
antee it has or should receive." 

Hrdy will review statements 
and licensing agreements at no 
charge in order to determine 
how long an audit will take 
and the audit's cost. "It's more or less a flat fee, 
unless there is some area that wasn't expected 
or covered in the estimate which would result 
in additional work. I would then talk to the 
client and tell him or her that this might be a 
fruitful area, whether it should be covered, and 
what would be the additional cost." 

For example, Hrdy observed that a typical 
audit does not include an inspection of produc- 
tion costs. This is a key area if a distributor was 
involved in the financing as well as the 
exploitation of a project. "If the client wants 
the audit to cover production and distribution, 
there would be an additional charge for that," 
she says. Mediamakers often encounter resis- 
tance from overseas distributors and sales 
agents, who often provide little or no informa- 
tion and may not be subject to state or federal 
jurisdiction. "If a distributor uses many sub-dis- 
tributors and there are many licenses negotiat- 
ed market by market or country by country, an 
audit will entail a lot of work," Hrdy notes. "If 




a distributor enters into one license with one 
company that may cover all of Europe, less 
work would be involved." 

A mediamaker should know how a sales 
agent or distributor works in the international 
marketplace and whether it services the deals 
itself or "jobs out" territories and media to sub- 
distributors. "Certain sale agents just set up the 
deal with the sub-licensors and assign their 
rights to those sub-licensors," she notes. If a 
mediamaker does not have a right to audit such 
sub-licensors, then he or she may be limited to 
inspecting the original sales agent's or distribu- 
tor's records. And these may not tell the full 
story. 

"I have audited the foreign branches of 
American distributors both theatrically and in 
home video," Hrdy says. "I also have audited 
local [foreign] distributors when the client has 
licensed pre-sales himself or herself or has the 
right to audit those sub-distributors. There 
have been some difficulties when the local dis- 



24 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



trihutor or its accounting department doesn't 
fully understand the deal itself, since the 
accounting department wasn't the one who 
made the deal. Sometimes you can tell on the 
face of the statement that there is some misun- 
derstanding about such things as what kind of 
expenses can and can't be deducted." 

It's best to wait at least 18 months to two 
years before exploring the possibility of an 
audit. This way you can examine the equiva- 
lent of six to eight quarterly statements. 
However, it's important to check whether there 
is an audit notice provision in your contract 
that says you have to serve written notice with- 
in a certain period of time after receiving your 
statement, or else you forfeit the right to audit 
that statement. 

Hrdy acknowledges that such audit notice 
provisions are generally one year to two years 
and "sometimes [as little as] six months, which 
is absolutely egregious in terms of examining 
the books." Mediamakers should insist on audit 
notice provisions of 18 months or two years and 
never settle for less than one year. Hrdy says 
that some filmmakers' attorneys claim that a 
project's books and records would be opened 
during any lawsuit even after the notice period 
has passed. Or if there is a pattern of improper 
reporting, there may be an issue as to whether 
the notice period is closed. But, she advises, 
"you don't want to go into that area, if possi- 
ble." 

Hrdy observes that an audit may not be jus- 
tified if a project has a small release. However, 
"Any project that has earned back its advance 
often can justify an audit." In addition, audits 
are not solely for fiction projects. Hrdy has 
audited documentaries that have gone on to 
theatrical release, such as Paris Is Burning, and 
has conducted audits in the instructional areas. 
"I've done a lot of auditing for National 
Geographic for video distribution and televi- 
sion syndication. I am handling 30 titles at 
once for video distribution and a season's worth 
of programming for television syndication. 
That's not to say that if a project is a very pop- 
ular documentary it shouldn't be audited, even 
if it hasn't been released theatrically." 

Producers should be especially wary when a 
distributor or sales agent has the right to place 
your film in a package with other projects and 
collect an advance — but you may not see any 
part of that advance. "Some distributors and 
sales agents will say that it's difficult to calcu- 
late how much of an advance each project will 
be entitled to until the package's license period 
is over, since certain projects may have 



AUDIOA'IDIiO 
POST PRODUCTION 



▲ 

VoiceWorks® 
Sound Studios 
212-541-6592 

Media 100 XS System 

After Effects /Boris Effects 
Scanner / Photoshop 

Sonic Solutions 
Digital Audio Editing 

Voice Over Casting 
Voice Over Recording 
Reasonable Rates!!! 



353 West 4Sth Street 2nd 1'loor 
New York, New York 10036 

FAX: 212-541-8139 
K-Mail: vworksC"' 210l.com 



; — 

Ax/id On-Line 
AVR-77 with 3D 



Interformat On-Line with 
D-2, DigiBeta 



Multi-Format 
Duplication 

Standards Conversions 



Beta SP & 
DV Camera Rentals 



212-213-0426 




~7 a Madison A venue 
Mew York, MY 10 016 



SPLASH 

STUDIOS 




DIGITAL AUDIO POST 
2 l 2 • 27 l • 8747 



DIALOG, FX EDITING ADR & FOLEY RECORDING 

168 5th Ave. ,5th floor N.W. New York N.Y. I 00 l 
Fax: (212) 271-8748 e-mail: bplprod@aol.com 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 25 



I .'II 



Serving independent filmmakers for 13 years, 
Solar is dedicated to bringing the highest quality, 
full-service post-production support to your project. 
We combine top of the line facilities with highly- 
experienced, creative Editors, Mixers, arid Tech Support. 



Avid 8000s and 400s 

Film Composers 

AVR77 

AfterEffects Compositing 



ProTaols 24 Mix Plus 
ADR, Voice Over 
Foley Recording 
Duplications 



Solar FilmA/idoo Prodi lotions 



212.473.3040 



632 Broadway NYC 10012 




437 Madison Avenue New York, N.Y. 10022 TEL: 212.415.2617 FAX: 212.415.3500 www.cdpweb.com 

M mi DU and DVCAM dubs to BETA 

...at prices independent 

filmmakers can afford 

212-765-6600 lichtenstein Creative Media 

1600 Broadway Suite 601 Hew York. N.Y. 10019 




Any project 

that has earned 

back its advance 

often can justify 

an audit. 



received a part of a package's advance that is 
greater than the amount of monies the project 
actually earns," Hrdy explains. "Other projects 
in the package may do well and cover the 
excess advance that an underperforming title 
may have been paid. Only at the license's end 
can a sales agent determine if there is any 
excess advance to be paid out." Mediamakers 
can insist in their contracts that their projects 
not be sold in packages, but that situation is 
rare. Sales agents often have an "output" deal 
with a sub-licensor or licensee that requires 
them to provide an on-going supply of product. 
Mediamakers 

should require 

that if their pro- 
ject is placed in a 
package, there 
should be no 
cross-collateral- 
ization (i.e., 

where the monies 
from one project 
can be used to off- 
set the losses of m^b^bbm 
another project) 
among the pro- 
jects in the package. A project's license agree- 
ment should indicate that each project's share 
of a package's monies should be specifically 
stated in a license agreement 

It's important to realize that high distribu- 
tion fees or sales commissions can impact on 
the monies a mediamaker receives. (Standard 
fees generally range from 15% to 35%.) In cer- 
tain cases, both the sales agent or distributor as 
well as the sub-licensor take separate fees; 
together these can total from as much as 40% 
to over 50%. Mediamakers should insist that all 
sub-distributors' fees be deducted from the 
sales agent's or distributor's fees or that there be 
a "cap" on any combination of fees and a limi- 
tation on the possibility of "double commis- 
sions." 

Mediamakers should also have an expense 
provision in their agreements stating that only 
those expenses directly attributable to their 
project should be deducted by a sales agent or 
distributor. Office expenses and general over- 
head should not be deductible, since that's the 
cost of doing business for an agent or distribu- 
tor representing several projects. Expenses 
should be verifiable and documentable. For 
example, if there is a large shipping cost on a 
statement, the mediamaker may want to see 
receipts. If a sales agent claims certain expens- 
es are for advertising, then it should provide 



26 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



invoices and samples of the advertisements. If a 
sales agent attends such markets as the 
American Film Market, Cannes, or MIFED, 
the agreement should indicate how market 
expenses, if any, are allocated among the differ- 
ent projects a sales agent represents. Such mar- 
keting expenses can be allocated on a pro rata 
basis (e.g., if a sales agents represents 10 pro- 
jects, then a mediamaker's film would assume 
1/10 of the market expenses) or under a system 
in which the projects which generate the most 
revenue would assume the greater share of the 
market expenses. 

Agreements should also contain a provision 
that places a "cap" on total and market expens- 
es incurred on behalf of a project without 
requiring the mediamaker's written consent. 

Since an audit can cost thousands of dollars, 
it's wise to negotiate a provision that if an audit 
reveals an underreporting of a certain percent- 
age in a sales agent's favor (e.g., 5-10%), then 
the sales agent should assume the costs of the 
audit. 

Almost all agreements have audit provi- 
sions, unless the project is a short film (these 
agreements generally contain no or a very 
sketchy audit provision). They also may be 
lacking in deal memos, when the parties 
expected to enter into a long-form agreement 
but never did. But under all circumstances, 
even in the short-form agreement, mediamak- 
ers should ensure that an audit provision is 
included. In its absence, a mediamaker can go 
to court and request an accounting of a sales 
agent's books. However, the audit provision 
would have prevented this extra time and 
expense. 

Hrdy offers one example of a project that did 
not justify an audit: "An artist's wife did a film 
about her husband's life, and it was released on 
video only and mostly distributed to museums. 
It was not going to be worth auditing because 
even if you doubled the number of videocas- 
settes reported, it still wouldn't be worth it due 
to such a low level of activity." 

A justified audit can pay for itself many 
times over, since it may reveal several clerical 
and bookkeeping errors, or other discrepancies 
in your favor. Each mediamaker should first 
conduct a cost/benefit analysis of whether the 
expense of an audit is justified. But regardless of 
whether you'll ever seek an audit, it's best to 
establish the groundwork for it as early possi- 
ble — which means during contract negotia- 
tions. 

Robert L Seigel [rhentlaw(Q>aol.com] is a NYC 

entertainment attorney and a principal in the Cirienia 

Film Consulting firm. 




Marion O. Hoffman 

a 

Now Community Cinemas 

presents 

The 3rd Annual 

Huntington 

International 

Film Festival 

July 1999 

Seeking fiction & documentary features from around 
the world and short films from Long Island & NY 
Metro Region for the festival and "Meet the Maker" 
ongoing independent film series. Exhibition formats 
include 35mm, 1 6mm, betacam, 3/4" video. 

Call 800.423.7611 
Email CinArtsCtr@aol.com 
Fax 516.423.5411 
Mail Cinema Arts Centre 

P.O. Box 498 

Huntington, NY 11743 



AVID rental 

large rooms 

with a view 

in mid-town 

24 hr building 



AVID 1000/AVR77 
AVID 800 Film Composer 



\ 



/ 



X 



As long-time 

AIVF members 

our goal is to help 

other independent 

producers and editors 



\ 



X 



Our rates are 
competitive 

DIVA Edit 
1-800-324-AVID 

330 W 42nd St NYC 




North Carolina 
School of the Arts 

Interviews are scheduled on campus. For more information, write: Admissions, 

North Carolina School of the Arts, 1 533 S. Main St., Winston-Salem, NC 271 27-21 88, 

or telephone (336) 770-3291, or visit us online: www.ncarts.edu 

An equal opportunity institution of the University ot North Carolina. 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 27 




VER THE COURSE OF AN AUSPICIOUS CAREER, DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKER ARTHUR DONG HAS CREATED AN EXTRAORDINARY BODY OF WORK, 
including the Academy Award-nominated Sewing Woman (1982), Forbidden City, U.S.A. (1989), the Peabody Award-winning Coming 
Out Under Fire (1994), and Out Rage '69, a program in the ITVS series The Question of Equality. He is currently at work on Tap! The 
Tempo of America, a social history of tap dancing. 

In his most recent film, Licensed To Kill (1997), Dong excavates the root causes of homophobia. Based on interviews with 
seven men convicted for murdering other men because they were gay, Dong elicits uncanny psychological insights from the killers 

while carefully situating their stories in the social and cultural contexts that both inform such hatred and tacitly sanction its expression through 

violence. 

After Licensed To Kill won the Filmmaker's Trophy and the Documentary Director's Award at the 1997 Sundance Film Festival, Dong was in 

the enviable position of being able to take his pick among distributors eager to acquire the film. Instead, Dong decided to distribute Licensed To 

Kill himself. In this interview from The AIVF Self-Distribution Toolkit, Dong discusses why and how he took this unusual step. 





Award-winning documentarian and 
self-distributing dynamo Arthur Dong 














You're self-distributing Licensed To Kill. But 1 
wanted to know if you've had any previous 
experience with self-distribution. 

Actually, yes. My film Sewing Woman, 
which I produced in 1982. 

What was your motivation for doing so? 


* 


uses hard work and ingenuity to 
market his films. 


M.' 


1 '.: 




Back then, self-distribution was still a 
relatively new idea. AIVF had pub- 
lished this little pamphlet called Doing 
It Yourself, authored by Julia Reichert of 
New Day Films. That was my inspira- 




l> 


3: 


\gF 


* 


tion. 

At the time I was working as a pro- 
duction assistant at ABC and I 
thought: "This isn't right. I'm a film- 
maker. I've got my own ideas to push. 
But how can I make a living, besides 
working for the corporate networks. 7 " 


V 


[1 




ng 


D 


ea] 


• <* 


Because of this little booklet, I said, 
"Well, this might be a way to do it." So 
I quit that job and said, "I'm going to try 
to distribute Sewing Woman." 


I Arthur Dong t 


alks 


ab 


out the self 


-distribution of his films 


BY 

1 


I ANN : 


IS MOOKAS 


I'd have to look at my records, but I 
think the film maintained me for a cou- 


^k 


ple of years — and this is a 14-minute, 
black-and-white film. I believe there 
were about 22 prints circulating all the 



time. And I sold a lot of copies. I wasn't 
selling video, because video wasn't really marketed then. That would have made it a lot easier! 

After spending two years distributing Seu'ing Woman myself, I signed non-exclusive contracts with other distributors. Because Sewiiig Woman 
was about a Chinese -American woman, it was immediately labeled as an Asian-American film — which it is, obviously. But I made it for a broad- 
er audience; I didn't make it just for Asian-American studies, which is a small group in terms of the market and would sustain very little in sales. 

That's why I finally chose the distributors that I chose: Third World Newsreel, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), and Picture Start in 
Chicago; nowadays NAATA (National Asian American Telecommunications Association) also handles it. When I signed off with the ADL, I 
said, "That's perfect, because it complements their focus on immigration." Picture Start wanted it because it was an art film. And I said, "That's 
great, that's a different audience." Third World Newsreel is concerned with women's issues and Third World issues. So I signed with these dis- 
tributors, and they didn't mind because they knew that their audiences were different. 



28 THE INDEPENDENT irch 1999 



Did any of these areas of interest emerge as the leader, in terms of sales? 

With Sewing Woman, actually the strongest area was women's studies. There's an orga- 
nization in Santa Rosa, the National Women's History Project, that's been around for 
a long time. They have a catalogue of educational materials in which they wanted to 
include Sewing Woman. They don't often invite distributors to advertise in their cata- 
logue, but they invited me to place an ad. This happened a few years later and it was 
as if there was a second wave to the film. For about five years running, the ads got big- 
ger and bigger every year because it was just like, "God, what a great market." They 
loved the film so much that they would bring my study guides with them to confer- 
ences and pass them out and say, "This is a film you all should buy." And I would get 
more sales. 

That's another thing: the study guide. I took the time to craft a study guide to go 
with the film and that's one of its key selling points. It's a good study guide; I had advi- 
sors working with me on it. I printed a bunch and gave them out freely. I know some 
distributors charge for them, but I didn't. 

As a self-distributor, I also found that buyers themselves really appreciated hearing 
from the filmmaker. Sometimes I'd call cold. My goal, especially for the first year, was 
every day I had to make at least five cold calls. I didn't have a sales rep to send out — 
I was it. So that was my goal: every day, five cold calls. And I made connections with 
people who use films. Oftentimes they would say, "It's refreshing to be able to talk to 
the filmmaker as opposed to someone that doesn't really care and doesn't even know 
the product." 

I'm sure it livens up their day. 

But I think the biggest hurdle, really, was having to say to myself, "This is not about 
me; this is about the product." Because it's hard to make a call and say, "Hey, there's 
this great film you should buy." I had to get over the hurdle of being shy about the film. 

How did you make that adjustment? 

I just wore a different hat. I just had to say, "Okay, I'm the sales rep now." I bit the bul- 
let and did it. That's hard, because a lot of filmmakers see themselves as artists and cre- 
ators, not as business people. That's a nice exalted goal, but to survive in this capital- 
ist society, you have to think otherwise. Especially with film, because it's so expensive. 
There's no way you can hide in a loft and just work and not make money. Maybe if all 
you had to do was buy paints and canvas, you might be able to do that on food stamps. 
But not with film or video. No way. 

Between Sewing Woman and Licensed To Kill, you made a number of other films, which are han- 
dled by various distributors in different markets. Given these established relationships, and with 
many options available to you, how did you decide to go back to self-distributing? 

Because Licensed To Kill was a personal film. There was the message of anti-gay vio- 
lence. Licensed To Kill took me 20 years to make and it wasn't a film that I wanted to 
sign off right away. 

The film I produced before Licensed To Kill was Coming Out Under Fire. I signed off 
on that with Zeitgeist Films. I'm very happy with them and what they did with it, 
except for the educational market. And with a film like Coming Out Under Fire, the 
educational possibilities are so important. I'm a little disappointed — it doesn't seem to 
be going anywhere. 

So partly as a result of that, I said, "Well, am I going to do the same thing with 
Licensed To Kiltt" I had three good distribution offers right after Sundance. I had to 
really think hard and I said, "You know, I think I have to do this one myself." 
Because it provided me with a soap box; it provided me with a forum to speak about 
the issue of homophobic violence. I also wanted the freedom to work with commu- 
nity groups and to be able to say, "Don't worry about the money. Take it." A dis- 
tributor would be less likely to do that — and rightfully so. They have to think about 
the bottom line. 

It was also a moment when other documentaries — Freida Lee Mock's Maya Lin: A 
Strong Clear Vision, Paris Poirer's Last Call at Maud's, and Marc Heustis's Sex Is . . . — 




! ill been self-distributed rather successfully. I know those filmmak- 
ud I met with them and asked, "How did you do it? What does it 
; What are the numbers?" They all said it's a lot of work, and I 

said, "Well, yeah, I know this work though. I had done this before with 

Sewing Woman, and I enjoy the business end of it." 

How did you define the audiences for Licensed To Kill? 

My dream audience would be the followers of [Senate majority leader] 
Trent Lott, religious conservatives and political conservatives. And 
teenage boys who might be on the verge of acting out this type of vio- 
lent behavior. That's my goal. Obviously, that's the more difficult audi- 
ence to reach. In releasing Licensed To Kill theatrically, I knew they may 
not plunk down the $8.50 to come into the theater; maybe just the gay 
and lesbian audience will. 

From the start, though, the press responded enthusiastically. They 
saw Licensed To Kill as newsworthy. In every city where it opened, we 
got at least one review if not a feature story or a syndicated feature. 
And what that said to me was: "Okay, the homophobes and the Boy 
Scouts might not pay to see it, but hell, when they pick up the news- 
paper, they're going to read about it." And for me that was just as 
important, if not more important, than the actual grosses. 

Were you working with a publicist? 

For certain cities like New York, L.A., and San Francisco we hired a 
publicist because they were very important for the market. In L.A., 
because I was also the booker, I was in direct communication with the 
Laemmle Theater offices and worked with them very closely. They 
helped a lot. And this happened in many other cities with local theater 
managers. 

Besides press outreach, did your distribution strategy incorporate outreach to 
other constituencies? 

In the cities where Licensed To Kill opened where there was also a gay 
and lesbian anti-violence program, I worked with them to coordinate 
opening night benefits, which we did several of, or made sure it was 
part of their organizing efforts because the film, obviously, speaks to 
their work and what they're concerned with. I worked closely with 
those organizations in about 10 different cities. It really was a part of a 
community effort — that was important. 



because it's traveling the state. And this is a film about anti-gay atti- 
tudes and violence. The press really gave it extensive coverage. 

How did the audiences in Texas respond? 

Well, I was hoping for more weird people. [Both laugh.] I was a little dis- 
appointed because they were all supportive — which is good too, of course! 

You made a point of being present for the screenings in the Texas tour, but to 
what extent did you do that in other parts of the country? 

Now here's another thing. How should I put this? I think filmmakers 
often sell themselves short, especially documentary and social issue- 
type filmmakers, because they're so passionate and will do anything for 
the cause, right? But you have to stop and think: "I've got to worry 
about paying the rent and supporting myself and my work." I treat this 
like a business. I've always put a price tag on me — but always allowed 
an out, saying: "Listen, my ultimate goal is educational. You tell me if 
you can't afford it; tell me what you can afford, and let's work it out." 
I always provide that option. But I always put a price tag from the 
beginning because I'm worth something. Especially with teachers, I 
always say, "So you can't afford it, but you want to use the film in your 
class. Well, I think that's great because that's how I want the film to be 
used. But would you teach for free?" It stops them cold. 

So anyway, the deal is: I would book the film, let them organize the 
benefits, and give them a larger share of the opening night proceeds. 
But if they wanted me to be there, I would ask for an honorarium. Of 
course, I would push for me being present, because it often helps tick- 
et sales to have the filmmaker there; they know that and I know that. 
And I put on a good show. It also helps the press to know that I'll be 
there. The day before you could get radio interviews. And radio is so 
important. People kind of pooh-pooh it, but radio reaches people while 
they're driving in the commuting hours, right before the event. They'll 
say, "Oh, I'll drive there instead." Having me there was very important 
tor press and for discussing the issues because it's a very difficult film. 
It's a film that doesn't give answers and audiences are often very dis- 
turbed after seeing it. So having me there provides a nice buffer. 

How did you plan the overall pattern or sequence of the film's release? 

In large part, the pattern of booking Licensed To Kill was based on what 
had happened with Coming Out Under Fire. I got reports from Zeitgeist 



My dream audience would be the followers of Senate majority leader Trent Lott, 

religious conservatives and political conservatives. And teenage boys who might be on 

the verge of acting out this type of violent behavior. That's my goal. 



Were these special events with gay and lesbian anti-violence projects an exten- 
sion of relationships you had already established during production? 

Some were. There was one thing that I actually am very proud of which 
I don't think a distributor would have done. We organized five screen- 
ings in Texas during the month of October. I wanted the film to have 
an impact there because so many hate crimes occur in Texas, and a 
couple of the crimes in the film happened in Texas. 

Although I had requests from festivals and theaters to book it in 
Texas, I said, "You have to wait until October." It was booked in five 
different cities and I was at each one of them. It was very important for 
the press to say that this is part of a five-city tour. It made an impact; 
it's not just some documentary that some guy made, it's important 



Films on Coming Out Under Fire and looked at all the theaters that had 
booked it and used that list as a map. It was that much easier because 
I'd call up and say, "Hi, I'm Arthur Dong who made Coming Out Under 
Fire, which you booked in April of '94-" I knew how much it made, so 
I could say, "And it grossed this much," which wasn't bad; it was a good 
run. And I'd say, "I have a new film." That's how I would open the 
conversation. In the same breath I would mention that it also opened 
at the Film Forum, which is very important, if you're able to say that. 

Did you seek funding specifically to support the self-distribution of Licensed To 
Kill? 

Yeah, I wrote probably four different proposals. I only got one grant, 



30 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



though, from the Paul Robeson Fund of the Funding 
Exchange. It helped a lot. The three others, I thought 
they would he easy. They were to places that funded dis- 
tribution of materials that addressed homophobia. But 
they turned me down. It was getting a little discouraging. 

Were you given a reason? 

No, but I've been on enough panels myself to know there 
could be a dozen reasons. It could be something as sim- 
ple as one member just didn't like it. Or one person had 
bad Chinese food and you're Chinese, [laughs] Or other 
more substantial reasons, hopefully. Or it could be bar- 
gaining: "Well, if you get this one, then I get that one." 
That's how they can finish and go home that night. 

I don't often call foundations to ask why I didn't get 
a grant, because I don't want to put them on the defen- 
sive. If I spend the time to write a proposal I must 
believe in it, but I always acknowledge that perhaps I 
didn't do a good enough job crafting the proposal. If so, 
then it's back to the drawing board. 

Apart from the Paul Robeson Fund grant, where did the rest of 
the financing for distribution come from? 

Me. 



And hopefully the self-distribution has started to pay for 
itself? 

Oh, yes. I had a feeling it would, based on the fact that Coming Out 
Under Fire did pretty well too. And Coming Out Under Fire is black and 
white, it's shorter. I just had a feeling that Licensed To Kill would get a 
response. It was all a gamble. But when Film Forum's Karen Cooper 
booked it — she was the first one to book it . . . 

Right after Sundance? 

No, way before Sundance. 

Before? 

Yeah, it's a little unusual. She was on one of the funding panels where 
she saw a sample clip. She called me and goes, "I want to see your first 
cut." I sent it to her, I believe, in September [1996]. And we booked it 
in October, way before I even finished. Sundance wasn't until January 
[1997]. But she booked it for April because, in having done publicity 
on my other films, I knew that you need a certain amount of lead 
time to get adequate coverage. She initially wanted it in 
January or February. "First of all," I said, "Karen, it's snowing. 
What are you going to do with my film in the middle of the 
snow?" She goes, "No, we get audiences." I said, "Yeah, but 
this is going to be tough . . . It's a tough film. I just don't 
want weather to be a part of the reason why people aren't 
going to come. What I need is April because what if it does 
well at Sundance? We want to be able to use that." So every- 
thing was timed for publicity. 

So that gave me the encouragement to 
call other theaters to say Film Forum's 
booking it. That helps a lot. Other the- 
aters joined in. There were three major 
cities — San Francisco, L.A., and New 
York — all concentrated into April. One 
reason for that is because, as a publicist, 
it's harder to get a national story if it was- 



I've always put a 

price tag on 

me — but always 

allowed an out, 

saying: "Listen, 

my ultimate goal 

is educational. 

You tell me if you 

can't afford it; tell 

me what you can 

afford, and let's 

work it out." I 

always provide 

that option. But I 

always put a price 

tag from the 

beginning 

because I'm 

worth something. 



n't a national event. But having those three cities was 
national enough for many publications. And, of 
course, we had other dates soon after that, so it really 
did become a national event. 



Corey Burly, an inmate 
at the Robertson Correctional 
Unit in Abilene, Texas was one 
of the convicts interviewed in 
Dong's film Licensed to Kill 
which examined the motives 
behind the murders of gay men 




Who were the three publicity firms you worked with? 

Karen Larsen 6k Associates in San Francisco, the 
Pogachefsky Company in L.A., and the Fisher 
Company in New York; the Film Forum also has their 
own in-house publicist. 

Film Forum didn't have the money to fly me in, so 
all the publicity would have been telephone stuff — no 
radio, no appearances, none of that. But they were 
able to convince the Soros Foundation to chip in for 
my air fare. (The Soros Documentary Fund was a 
funder of Licensed To Kill.) We had a lot of participants 
in this deal, because New York is so expensive. The 
premiere was co-sponsored by the New Festival [one 
of New York's gay and lesbian film festivals] and Asian 
CineVision. Then we had a special private screening 
for high donors to the New York Gay and Lesbian 
Anti-Violence Program. Their share was a week's stay 
at a hotel, which was not cheap. It was like a multi- 
partied event for me to be in New York. It was a very 
busy week, but a very successful one. 
In terms of these benefits, in some cities I would try to 
create coalitions. Because I'm Asian and I'm also gay, and those two 
communities don't often get together. I would call Asian CineVision — 
I have a history with them — and say, "Well, I'd like you to work with 
the New Festival . . ." 

And you'd say the same thing to the folks at the New Festival . . . 

"If you want the premiere, you're going to have to work with this 
group." Not that I had to force them, they just hadn't thought of it. 
This gave them the chance. 

Politically, this serves another purpose outside the subject of the film. 
It helps create working relationships between two different communi- 
ties. You see this mix in the audience. What I often find is it's more gay 
than Asian in these mixes, but hey, you know, at least it happened. At 
least their members get the mailings. Especially with the Asian- 
American community, they know my work because my first films were 
about Asian Americans and were very popular with that com- 
munity. Now they get mailings with my name on it, but about 
a gay-themed film. So they're forced to be confronted with 
this. They realize, "Oh, the guy's a fag. But he did such good 
work before." They're forced to see that the gay community 
isn't all white. "Here's one of ours whose work I respected 
from before." It makes them have to think. That's very 
important for me personally. And that is part of the distribu- 
tion effort, to get that communication going. 

loannis Mookas is an independent producer and writer 
based in New York. 

Licensed to Kill: www.filmmag. 
com/community ladong. 
The AIVF Self-Distribution Toolkit 
will be available this spring. For inquiries 
& orders, contact: AIVF; 304 Hudson 
St., 6th/]., NY, NY 10013; (212) 807- 
1400 x. 303; www.aivf.org 




March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 31 







ulina Porizkova and Julian Sa 
Jay Anania's Long Time Sir 



r . Memories, Modern Myths 

T Jdy nfldnid by Jeremy Lehrer 



I1TH ONE FOOT FIRMLY PLANTED IN THE ABSTRACT, 
Jay Anania is making feature films unlike any else in America today. 
Steeped in beauty, memory, myth, and dreams, Anania's films are 
intoxicating visual poems that display a unique and profound aesthet- 
ic rigor. Driven by fundamental conclusions about cinema and a pierc- 
ing consciousness of its elements, Anania's films are so rigorous they 
might be viewed as a kind of polemic. 

Anania confirms just as much in conversation. "It's quite difficult to 
be making films that are stylistically as strident as these are," says the 
New York-based filmmaker. "On the other hand, it's what I'm moved 
to do." Anania writes, directs, and edits his films. As he explains, to 
achieve his vision, all of the elements he can control as a filmmaker 
must "conspire to create a single coherent image." 

Now age 48, Anania has been making films since the seventies, 
when he first picked up a Bolex to create visual studies of rooms and 
landscapes. Assembling this footage into short experimental pieces, 
Anania's cinematic investigations included scratching on film. These 
solo dalliances evolved into more elaborate projects when Anania was 
asked to direct a documentary' following Allen Ginsberg and William 
Burroughs when the two visited North Carolina in 1976. At the time, 
Anania was doing graduate work in visual design at the North Carolina 
School of Design. After this auspicious enterprise, Anania moved to 
Boston in the hopes of directing documentaries for WGBH, Boston's 
public television affiliate. Editing jobs were abundant at the time, so 
Anania began as an editor at WGBH and later returned to directing. 
Most recently, Anania has shot, directed, edited, and produced docu- 
mentary dispatches for PBS from locations including Gaza, the West 
Bank, and Cairo. 

But he credits his early experimentation with giving him an under- 



standing of the basic building blocks of the medium. "The kind of 
note-taking and sketches that I would do as an experimental film- 
maker focused my attention very specifically on the medium and all of 
the elements that go into it," he says. "It really starts with the most 
fundamental elements, and I think that, at least for me, the work suc- 
ceeds when it stays in touch with that." 

Anania made his first feature, The Pagan Book of Arthur Rimbaud, in 
1996. He describes it as an attempt to capture the imaginative texture 
of the nineteenth century French Symbolist poet's "fevered, intense, 
brilliant, mystical, visionary mind." Filled with gorgeous imagery of 
Rimbaud's milieu, the film begins with a stream of abstract images fol- 
lowed by an absolutely stunning overhead shot of the poet seen 
through the billowing folds of a curtain. As he paints the story of 
Rimbaud's journey from his childhood home, to Paris, to a self- 
imposed exile in Africa, Anania punctuates the narrative with abstract 
flashes of nature and light. The film is almost palpable and is filled 
with visceral, uncompromised expression — both by the filmmaker and 
the poet portrayed. 



A 



NANIA MADE HIS SECOND FEATURE, LONG T/ME S/NCE, WHICH 
played at the 1998 Toronto International Film Festival, as a kind of 
reaction to The Pagan Book. "The experience of [The Pagan Book], the 
sort of lush, romantic, dark feeling of the Rimbaud film, made me 
thirst, as one does, for the opposite," he says. Anania created that 
opposite in Diane Thwait, a natural illustrator played with cold preci- 
sion by Paulina Porizkova. Sparked by a song, Diane begins to remem- 
ber events that may have occurred over 20 years earlier when, follow- 
ing a nighttime accident, she may have witnessed a violent crime at 



32 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



the roadside. Her search to recall what happened that 

night brings her into contact with a character played by 

Julian Sands. 

Ostensibly about Diane's struggle to remember the past, 

a much deeper level of myth permeates the film and the 

characters within it. Anania was initially inspired to create 

the film with the idea of Diane as a modern-day trace of the 

goddess Artemis, the goddess of the hunt, and the Sands 

character echoing her twin Apollo, god of the sun. 

"I remember reading somewhere that Artemis and Apollo 

were the most inhuman of all the gods, because they were 

almost more like aesthetic beings; they were extremely pure 

in a way that humans aren't," 

Anania explains. "1 thought I 

would like to make a film 

which imagined a character 

that was something like that, 

had something of that rigor. So 

I wrote Long Time Since as 

something like a meditation 

on a present-day Artemis, or 

Diana, which is her Roman 

name." 

g With this dynamic, Diane's 

a. 

■2 attempt to recapture the past 

| functions as a displaced effort 

to recognize her relation to 

Artemis. The mythical Arte- 
mis and Apollo murdered the 14 children 
of Niobe (Niobe turned to stone lament- 
ing the loss), and the ghosts that haunt 
Diane are remnants of this cold-blooded 
massacre wrought by the two gods. Since 
the film is the picture of compositional 
discipline, Anania uses a number of visual 
and narrative metaphors to accentuate 
Diane's struggle. Like The Pagan Book of 
Arthur Rimbaud, Long Time Since is haunt- 
ed with abstract images of light: a reflec- 
tion of moonlight on rippling water, 
blurred and fleeting images of distant 
lights (precisely and beautifully pho- 
tographed by cinematographer Oliver 
Bokelberg). When one character tells the 

story of a man who falls in love with a reflection of the moon and 
drowns in an attempt to touch it, the story and its visual textures seem 
to encapsulate a number of ideas essential to Anania: the power of 
myth, the intoxicating effect of beauty and memory, the impossibility 
of ever attaining the objects of our desire. "I think it's much more 
interesting to have unrequited desires, unconsummated desires in a 
film," Anania observes. 

Understanding Anania's films involves undressing the metaphorical 
layers to reveal the abstract heart that makes them pulse. For Anania, 
balancing the tensions between abstract experimentation and narra- 
tive flow is not an easy task. "Ideally that tension is resolved in favor 
of neither the abstraction nor the narrative flow but is instead resolved 
in favor of the film," Anania says. "I would not like to think of abstrac- 




A number of ideas are 
essential to Anania: 

the power of myth, the 
intoxicating effect of 
beauty and memory, 

the impossibility of ever 

attaining the objects 

of our desire. 



tions as the weak point, nor would I like to think of the narrative as 
the necessary evil on which to hang them. Hopefully the narrative just 
emerges out of the flow of fundamental elements that are placed up 
there." 

While festival audiences have been enthusiastic about his films and 
Long Time Since was recently taken on by a European sales agent, 
American theatrical distribution has been a tougher sell. The Pagan 
Book of Arthur Rimbaud was set to be released in the U.S. by Noon 
Pictures, a company whose catalog included some of Jean-Luc 
Godard's later work, but the company folded before it could release 
Anania's film. Undaunted, Anania is certain there is an American 
audience. "I think the big problem is getting any distributor to agree to 
make the effort to find this probably rela- 
tively small [audience]," he says. "What 
[the films] need is a distributor who's 
willing to hit the single, not needing the 
home run, and do the work that's neces- 
sary to take the film to the audience that 
I do believe is there." 

Not surprisingly for a filmmaker tire- 
lessly devoted to his vision, Anania cites 
Godard and Robert Bresson as influences 
on his own aesthetic. "The energies of 
their films are so different, but the plea- 
sures I get from both of those filmmakers 
are very inspiring." Anania also mentions 
Japanese filmmaking as an inspiration. 
But it's the American avant-garde that 
has been the guiding light that led him to 
his current art. 

"My original interest in film and the 
scope of my ambitions artistically comes 
from a type of film that's really seen very 
little anymore. And it's what was once 
called experimental filmmaking, personal 
filmmaking, avant-garde filmmaking. 
And there are sort of the acknowledged 
masters of the American avant-garde: 
Stan Brakhage and Hollis Frampton." 

What Anania respects most is a com- 
mitment to a personal vision, and in this 
regard, he mentions avant-garde film- 
makers Michael Snow, Ernie Gehr, and 
director Peter Greenaway. Regarding 
Greenaway, Anania observes, "I think that he's one of the very small 
handful of important filmmakers working today. Like Frampton, Snow, 
and Brakhage, the extent to which he pursues his vision is remarkable 
and completely rare at this level of filmmaking." 

Despite his clarity about his own vision, Anania's films remain 
deeply haunting because there is a layer of mystery to them. There are, 
after all, certain questions Anania himself can't answer. The question 
of what is beautiful and why we find it so remains an elusive one. But 
as Anania says of "the play of light on water," an image that appears in 
both of his films, "I don't know why I like to look at that; I like to look 
at it. It gives me pleasure." And, like the poetry of Rimbaud, it is this 
elusive quality that drives Anania to create and to remember. 

Jeremy Lehrer is a freelance writer living in New York. 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 33 



Over the past 30 years, St. Clair Bourne has amassed a substantial body of 
work about strong and controversial black artists and leaders: LeRoi Jones, 
Langston Hughes, Spike Lee, and John Henrick Clarke, among others. Most 
recently hes set his sights on the singer, actor, and activist Paul Robeson and 
former Black Panther Stokely Carmichael. Here Bourne reflects on his long 
career, the state of black documentary, and modern-day griots.^^^^M^Mi 

Bourne to be ^SX/ild 

by Richard Baimbridge 



In person, St. Clair Bourne exhudes much of the same charisma 
that the subjects of his documentaries and news pieces are known 
for — people like Amiri Baraka (formerly LeRoi Jones), Malcolm X, and 
Langston Hughes, to name a few, who seem to possess a passion that is 
uncommon in this age. Though the impression of Bourne etched in my 
mind comes from images taken nearly 30 years ago, when he was a 
young face behind PBS's Black Journal, he is still easily recognizable 
these days, commanding an air of respect on the set, like a five-star 
general in the old- school military. 

Perhaps that's what he might have been, had he not dropped out of 
the service and joined the battle for civil rights in the early sixties, arm- 
ing himself with a camera instead of a rifle and embarking on a mission 
to tell history through the eyes of an African-American filmmaker. 

On this afternoon, as New York shows its first signs of winter, 
Bourne is in a rehearsal studio near Times Square, the owner looking 
on nervously as a technician ignites pictures of Eslanda Robeson, Paul 
Robeson's mother, one after another to be used in Bourne's new docu- 
mentary Paul Robeson: Here I Stand! It is perhaps the most controver- 
sial look at the legendary black actor, vocalist, and political activist 
ever undertaken — set to air on PBS's American Masters series in 
February as part of Black History month. "I want to get the flames just 
right," Bourne explains to his DP with a can of lighter fluid in his 
hands. "You know, rising slowly from the bottom, then engulfing the 
whole thing." 

The room is filled with smoke, and the rehearsal space 
owner is growing impatient, so they decide to call it a 
wrap. I stroll over and extend a hand towards him, 
"Still starting fires, St. Clair?" I ask, as he smiles 
broadly and shakes my hand, no doubt wondering 
who the hell this skinny young white kid is, intrud- 
ing on his set. 




In 1963, Bourne was a 19-year-old student at Georgetown 
University when he was arrested for participating in a sit-in for civil 
rights and subsequently expelled from school. It was an event that 
changed the course of his life forever — a first taste of activism that 
made his military career in the ROTC seem like a fallacy. In 1968, 
Bourne was again arrested and thrown out of school, only this time it 
was Columbia University film school, and his film professor advised 
him not to worry because he would recommend him for a position at 
a new series on public television called Black Journal. "Literally three 
days after I got out of jail," Bourne says, "I was associate producer of a 
national black television show." 

It was by no means an end to his protests, however. Even at Black 
Journal, which was billed by PBS as a progressive television series "by, 
for, and about black people" and which, for the most part, delivered on 
that promise, Bourne would eventually walk out, along with 1 1 other 
staff members, until the network bowed to demands that the white 
executive producer be replaced by a black producer. Bourne and his 
colleagues eventually won the battle, and William Greaves became the 
first black executive producer of the first black news series on 
American television. 

There were a lot firsts that came out of Black Journal, including 
Madelaine Anderson, who later became the first black female produc- 
er at NET — another unprecedented event in television history. Black 
Journal was the first national media outlet to show African Americans 
in African dress, giving an Afro-centric view of the news, includ- 
ing events in South Africa or pertaining to the Nation of 
Islam, which had been all but demonized by the main- 
stream media at that time. 

"It's hard to imagine what an impact Black Journal 
had," Bourne recalls nostalgically. "Even though we only 
had an hour a month on public television, I think we 
really made a difference in people's lives, as well as in tele- 
vision. The news magazine format, for example — I think 
we set the standard for that, because we were on the air 
for two years before 60 Minutes even showed up." 

Riding back to the editing room on a city bus, 
Bourne is dressed in a bomber jacket and baseball cap, 
like the archetypical director or an ex-pilot, both of 
which he is. As we discuss the Paul Robeson docu- 
mentary, he begins to air his grievances with PBS, 

Director/producer St. Clair Bourne 



which apparently have never ended since his days with Black journal. 

"For a number of reasons, I'm not too happy with [Here I Stand!] ," 
he confesses. "PBS almost always expects an inferior product when 
they're dealing with black film. There's this 
subtle racism that exists there. For example, 
they want to put the Robeson film on American 
Masters for Black History month, and I think it 
shouldn't be. I think it should be in general 
programming. But they see it as black material, 
and put it on February when everybody has stuff 
coming out. It's their month oj blackness." 

In 1971, just after leaving Black Journal, 
Bourne set out on his own to create Chamba 
Mediaworks, a production company that 
remains in existence to this day. Bourne has 
made over 40 documentary films for PBS, 
HBO, and National Geographic, including Let 
the Church Say Amen, the story of a young 
black student preparing to become a minister; 
In Motion: Amiri Baraka, a powerful look at the 
literary figure and black activist formerly 
known as LeRoi Jones, as he faced criminal 
charges for allegedly abusing his wife (which 
she denied) and resisting arrest; and The Black 
and the Green, which follows a group of black 
activists on a trip to Northern Ireland to meet 
with the I.R.A. Some of his films have also 
been privately financed, including such as John 
Henrick Clarke: Great and Mighty Walk, which 

was financed by Wesley Snipes and took Grand Prize for Best 
Documentary at the 1997 Urbanworld Film Festival. 

His schedule shows no signs of slowing down, either, with more than 
seven projects currently in various stages of production, such as Ready 
for Revolution, a doc that features candid conversations with Stokely 
Carmichael (now known as Kwame Ture) on the behind-the-scenes 
history of SNCC and the Black Panthers during the civil rights move- 
ment. Bourne had recently been set to direct a documentary on Tupac 
Shakur for HBO, when the deal fell through because of negotiations 
with Shakur's estate. However, HBO then asked him to produce a doc- 
umentary on Gordon Parks, artist and director of S/ia/t, called Half Past 
Autumn. Production on that film began in December, while Bourne 
was still working on the Robeson documentary. 

"If you're a beginning filmmaker, PBS is probably the best place to 
start," Bourne says. "But if you're in any way experienced, it's a very 
frustrating, disappointing place, and quite frankly I try to avoid it. On 
the other hand, my experience with HBO has been excellent, both for 
budget and for style reasons, it's pretty good. That's mostly based on 
one person — Sheila Nevins. She doesn't just commission one type of 
documentary film, even though she gets a lot of criticism for that. The 
battle at HBO, I find, is getting your concept accepted. Once you do 
that, the budgets are good, and they're very supportive. Sheila has 
made films herself, so she's very understanding." 

Returning to the subject of the Robeson film, Bourne says he was 
asked to direct the film, and accepted partly because Robeson is a per- 
son for whom he has a great deal of admiration, but also because he 
wanted to set the record straight on who Robeson really was — the 
man, as opposed to the myth. He laughs as we sit in the editing room, 



"I got into film because I 
would look at documentaries 
on CBS about the civil rights 

movement, and they would 
just miss things. They'd never 
talk to the black audience — 
it was always a white guy talk- 
ing to what he assumed was a 
white audience, about 'those 

people.' Well, I was 'those 

people' and thought, 'How 

come you're talking about me 

as if I'm not in the room? 

And on top of that, you're 
lying! Maybe you don't know 

you're lying, but you are.' " 



watching tapes of interviews, trying to decide whose account to use for 
the number of languages Robeson actually spoke. "Some say four, some 
say 12, some say 20," he laughs. "This film's going to be very contro- 
versial, because everybody has this 'saint' image 
of Paul Robeson." Robeson's mother died in a 
fire when he was six, Bourne explains. "I think 
that affected him all throughout his life, and I 
want to use flames and her picture being 
burned, symbolically, all throughout the film. 
It's a way to portray psychological subtext. 
Robeson had a series of affairs. He was married 
to a woman who basically became his mother 
and took care of him." 



Other than his choice of subject matter, 
which almost exclusively deals with controver- 
sial black male figures, Bourne's work springs 
from a traditional approach to documentary 
filmmaking, with its talking head interviews and 
archival footage. This perhaps owes to his early 
ties to journalism. His father was a journalist 
who came from the West Indies to find a "better 
life" in America and instead found Bed Stuy 
(the Brooklyn neighborhood where Do the Right 
Thing was filmed, as well as Bourne's resulting 
documentary Making of "Do the Right Thing"). 
Bourne was also a journalist in the Peace Corps 
in Peru, but abandoned the profession because 
he found it too limiting. Moving into film, he 
went on to push the boundaries in form, as well as content. 

"The difference between documentary and news to me is that you 
don't really have rules in documentary," he says. "It's fiction under the 
guise of objectivity. I mean, all news is that anyhow, but doc makers 
have a license to [fictionalize]. Especially now, and over the last ten 
years, because in order for the form to survive, it's had to reinvent 
itself. Even during my Blaclc journal days, I realized that I couldn't live 
under the so-called 'rules' of journalistic TV. That's one of the reasons 
why I left. I wanted to combine analysis and style, and in a traditional 
[news] doc, you can't do that too much. Then I found out that there 
was a place where you could combine analysis and style, and it was 
called 'independent film.' " 

Though Bourne says conditions now are almost universally better 
for black filmmakers thanks to the strides made in Hollywood by such 
directors as Spike Lee, John Singleton, the Hudlin brothers, Bill Duke, 
and others, he also concedes that life in the independent world appears 
to have gotten even more difficult for all filmmakers, regardless of race, 
"and that's especially true for the world of documentary films," he says. 
Not long ago, in fact, Bourne had serious doubts about his ability to 
continue as a documentary filmmaker, citing issues such as funding 
cuts, a political swing to the right since the seventies, and a serious 
shift in where black audiences were seeking their views of "reality" in 
cinema. 

"I had a 20-year retrospective at the Whitney [Museum in New 
York] in 1988," he says, "and that's when it hit me that things were 
shitting. With the drift to the [political] right and budget and the audi- 
ence shrinking, I knew that docs weren't going to get mass audiences — 
not that they were getting mass audiences before. But even the usual 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 35 



The first black 
actor to play 
Shakespeare's 
Othello: Paul 
Robeson and 
Peggy Ashcroft at 
the Savoy Theater 
in London, 1930. 



doc audience was getting smaller, so I figured that making features was 
the only way to go." In that respect, Bourne now has two projects in 
Je\ elopment: The Run, from a screenplay by Charles Fuller (A Soldier's 
Story); and Exiles and Allies, a reality-based feature that follows the 
lives of five American Vietnam war deserters in Sweden. 

One of the main factors responsible for the changing landscape of 
black film, according to Bourne, was the success of Do the Right Thing, 
which he says "snatched the 'real-life' appeal away from documentary 
film tor black audiences. 

"In my generation, people would come to see my films because a 
documentary carried with it a kind of noble mission. In commercial 
terms, it would be called 'street credibility' today. But Spike [Lee] came 
along and changed 
everything. He 
said 'I'm gonna 
give you real life — 
the real thing.' 
And whether you 
agree with that or 
not, the hype 
worked. The 

street credibility 
remained in docu- 
mentaries, but it 
became the old 
man. The new 
thing was to put it 
right on the big 
screen, and people 
could see a certain 
kind of reality in 
the dialogue and 
the relationships, 
but it would be in 
the big form, so 
that's where black 
people went. This 
English filmmaker 
I once met said 
'When I tell peo- 
ple I'm a docu- 
mentary filmmaker, they look at me as if I'm a glass blower.' And that 
said it all, basically." 

Nonetheless, Bourne still manages to make a full-time living 

from his documentary films, and he does so by juggling multiple pro- 
jects simultaneously, playing the role of director, producer, and script 
supervisor on a number of projects all at once. 

Late into the evening, Bourne takes a break from editing Here 1 
Stand! to attend a rough-cut screening of Innocent Until Proven Guilty, 
a film he is executive producing with Kirsten Johnson, director of 
Bmtu, a provocative doc on female genital mutilation. Innocent tracks 
a group of troubled Washington D.C. youth participating in a program 
started by James Forman, Jr. (son of renowned black civil rights activist 
James Forman) who is a D.C. public defender. In the heated discussion 
that follows the screening, Bourne breaks into a "I'm gonna tell you 
how it really is" speech that proves his fervor for defending the "radi- 



cal" black position of the early days has not waned in the least. His 
criticism is sharp, but ultimately he hopes it will be enough to save the 
film from falling into "the standard white liberal solution that we all 
know does not work." 

Walking back through Times Square, he confides that "For a long 
time, I didn't work with white people." (Kirsten Johnson, the director 
of Innocent, is white.) "I found that whites were either awkward to 
work with, or they thought they were super-cool for doing a black film. 
I fired the first DP I had for Making of "Do the Right Thing" after the 
first day," Bourne says. "He was a white guy, and all the footage he shot 
in Bed-Stuy was of kids playing in the gutter. I grew up in Bed Stuy — 
that's not what it's like." 




The issue of racial barriers surfaces again when I propose to Bourne 
the central idea I hold of his work, which is that he is an historian on 
a crusade, attempting to fill the media void on African American fig- 
ures who have contributed to our society and culture, but were not 
sufficiently recognized for their accomplishments. Yet again, Bourne 
sees it in a totally different way. 

"I got into film because I would look at documentaries on CBS 
about the civil rights movement, and they would just miss things," he 
says. "They'd never talk to the black audience — it was always a white 
guy talking to what he assumed was a white audience, about 'those 
people.' Well, I was 'those people' and thought, 'How come you're 
talking about me as if I'm not in the room? And on top of that, you're 
lying! Maybe you don't know you're lying, but you are.' So it's not so 
much a rewriting of history, as I'm just trying to portray people who are 
against the history of the Euro-centric world, or who hold another ver- 
sion of 'history.' And it's very difficult, because then people see that as 



36 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



'rewriting' history." 

Scanning through hours of historical footage of Paul Robeson giving speeches in fluent 
Russian and singing for cheering audiences of East German youths, we discuss the process of 
how Bourne found the archival footage for this documentary. He says he was fortunate in that 
he was given access to home videos and photographs owned by Paul Robeson, Jr., and that he 
also stumbled across an archive in East Germany that had just been opened for the first time, 
and included an entire documentary on Robeson's tour of Eastern Europe in the 1960s. 

He then explains the concept of a "griot," an African word for an oral historian. "What I've 
discovered with more contemporary subjects is that there's a whole network of people who now 
shoot home videos and keep them," he says. "Especially black people. I found one guy in 
Brooklyn who's got like 21 years of famous and infamous speakers who have come through and 
talked about black subject matter. These guys are basically our own African-American elec- 
tronic griots. I also have still photos that I've been shooting for 30 years, and this summer I orga- 
nized them. So now I have my own archive. I even interviewed my own father for [the Robeson 
documentary] because he had written articles about the protests at the wedding of Paul 
Robeson, Jr.," who married a white Jewish girl. 



We are a facility specializing in 
picture and audio post for projects 

finished on film. We offer full audio 
services; sound design, foley, ADR 

and mixing. Film editing at 24 or 30 
fps on high end digital non linear 

systems and full technical support at 
every stage of your project Please 
contact us for more information. 



Being in Bourne's presence, it's hard not to feel a strong sense of nostalgia. His speech 

is peppered with anachronisms from sixties uptown slang, like "woofing" and "cats." He is one 
of the few remaining members of the old guard who still sees things as clearly as they seemed 




three decades ago — a time that, though more difficult in 
many ways, was also far less complex than the present, 
where the very idea of being a "black filmmaker" is an 
increasingly complicated concept. 

"There are black filmmakers today who don't operate on 
the black aesthetic," Bourne agrees. "And I think that's 
fine. They're just filmmakers who happen to be black, which is essentially what I consider myself 
to be, as well." Yet he says there are several younger people whom he views as carrying on his 
legacy, such as documentarians Kathy Sandler (A Question of Color) and Louis Massiah (Ida B. 
Wells and Eyes on the Prize II), as well as feature director Julie Dash [Daughters of the Dust). 

"I don't think that black documentary will disappear," he says. "But I do worry that the play- 
ing field is getting smaller and creatively more constrained." 

It's nearly 10 p.m. when Bourne finally leaves the editing room for the night, walking out 
onto the cold streets surrounding Times Square. He says he'll be working non-stop to get the 
Robeson film to PBS on schedule for its February 24 air date. Just in time for Black History 
month. 

"Like this young guy once said to me, 'They gave us the coldest month of the year, and the 
shortest,' " he says with a laugh. "No matter what, man, you just can't win." 



Richard Baimbridge is a frequent contributor to The Independent. 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 37 



DISTRIBUTOR 



First Run/Icarus Films 



BY LlSSA GlBBS 



First Run/Icarus Films, Inc., 153 Waverly Place, 6th 
fl., New York, NY 10014 ; (212) 727-1711; fax: 255- 
7923; jmiller@frif.com; www.echonyc.com/~frif/; 
contact: Jonathan Miller, President 

What is First Run/Icarus? 

First Run/Icarus Films is one of the leading distributors 
of documentary film and video in the U.S. and Canada. 

What is First Run/Icarus' relationship to other arms 
of First Run? 

I would not say that First Run/Icarus Films, Inc. is an 
arm of First Run Features. It is a separate corporation 
formed in 1987, when Icarus Films (founded in 1978) 
and First Run Features (founded in 1979) merged their 




nontheatncal divisions to create a new company. It is 
owned by the two companies Icarus Films and First Run 
Features. First Run/Icarus Films does all of the nonthe- 
atrical distribution for all of First Run Features' and 
Icarus Films' titles. In addition we aggressively acquire 
films directly; in fact, most of the 700 films and videos 
that we currently distribute have been acquired for dis- 
tribution directly by First Run/Icarus Films (and most of 
our income comes from those titles). Our primary focus 
remains on the nontheatrical markets, but for all of the 
films that we acquire directly we distribute to all mar- 
kets and territories for which we have the rights. 



Who is First Run/Icarus? 

President: Jonathan Miller; Sales Director: Kan Noreri; 
Acquisitions/Publicity Coordinator: Jennifer Hohlihan; 
and Sales Coordinator: Tom Hyland 

Total number of employees at First Run/Icarus: 

Six. 

Unofficial motto or driving philosophy: 

Never enter into a negotiation you are not prepared to 
walk away from. 

What would people be most surprised to learn 
about First Run/Icarus or its founders and/or key 
staff? 

I have been doing this for over 22 years. At least, that 
is what I am most surprised to realize! I started work- 
ing in distribution in 1976 while attending film school at 
NYU and working on my own documentary film. I start- 
ed out working for Tricontinental Film Center in 1976, 
stuffing envelopes for mailings. I was then promoted to 
cleaning and repairing and shipping 16mm prints (no 
video in those days). 

Films and filmmakers you distribute: 

The Vanishing Line, by Maren Monsen, MD; Family 
Name, by Macky Alston; Travis, by Richard Kotuk; The 
Battle of Chile and Chile, Obstinate Memory, by 



Patricio Guzman; Dear Dr. Spencer, by Danielle Renfrew 
and Beth Seltzer; The Way Things Go, by Peter Fischli 
and David Weiss; Amor Natural, by Heddy 
Honigmann; The Last Bolshevik, by Chris Marker; The 
Uprising of '34, by Judith Helfand and George Stoney; 
and The Last Angel of History and Seven Songs for 
Malcolm X, by John Akomfrah 

Generally speaking, what types of works do you dis- 
tribute? 




We distribute a very broad range of docu- 
mentary films (as well as a few animated 
and short films) of any length, format, pro- 
duction date, language, etc. We have many 
films on international issues, U.S. social 
and political issues, history, sociology, 
anthropology, women's studies, media 
studies, Jewish studies, and a growing col- 
lection of films in health and medical sci- 
ences. And, of course, we are also always 
open to new films on subjects we haven't 
thought of. 



38 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



What drives you to acquire the films you do? 

I like well structured and produced films, though not 
necessarily in any one given form (diary films, narrated 
archival films, un-narrated observational films, etc). I 
don't mind which form, as long as it is well done, inter- 
esting, and engaging. Of course, these choices (length, 
language, form, etc.) may affect "market success," but 
not necessarily our decision of whether to take the film 
or not. 

Is First Run/Icarus also involved in co-production 
or co-financing of works? 

No. 

Best known title in First Run/Icarus' collection: 

This probably depends on how old the person answer- 
ing the question is — whether you want films from the 
70s, '80s, or '90s. Older titles: Americas in Transition 
(Obie Benz), El Salvador: Another Vietnam (Glenn 
Silber and Tete Vasconellos), Gods of Metal (Robert 
Richter), Middletown (Peter Davis), A Veiled Revolution 
(Elizabeth Fernea), The Wobblies (Deborah Shaffer and 
Stu Bird), and of course many other important First Run 
Features titles (The War at Home, Sherman's March, 
etc.). 

What's your basic approach to releasing a title? 

Direct mail (100,000+ pieces per year of different spe- 
cialized brochures). Telephone sales (two full-time peo- 
ple). Free previews. Email (postings to different lists 
every week). Web site (monthly updates). Catalogs. 
Reviews in specialized journals, magazines, and on-line 
newsletters. Conferences. Festivals. Markets. 
Relationships. Reputation. 

Where do First Run/Icarus titles generally show 
(range of theaters, markets, regions, etc.)? 

At colleges, universities, film societies and film festi- 
vals, public libraries, high schools, government agen- 
cies, unions, health care agencies, hospitals and hos- 
pices, some television. Our titles are in most major AV 
collections across the country. We had a major success 
at the Film Forum theater in New York this past 
September with The Battle of Chile and Chile, Obstinate 
Memory, which grossed over $37,000 in two weeks 
playing only three shows per day, and these films have 
played in other festival and art venues across the coun- 
try. Several of our films were on the PBS series P.O.V. 
this past year: The Vanishing Line and Family Name. 

Where do you find your titles and how should film- 
makers approach you for consideration? 

We have recently attended or plan to attend this year: 
the National Educational Media Market (Oakland), Hot 
Docs (Toronto), International Documentary Filmfestival 
Amsterdam, MIP or MIPCOM (Cannes), Sunny Side of 
the Doc (Marseilles), Cinema du Reel (Paris), the Berlin 
Film Festival, and the Yamagata International 
Documentary Film Festival (Japan). We also know peo- 
ple, or they know us. If I don't know you, call me. 




Range of production budgets of titles in your col- 
lection: 

From virtually nothing to well over $1,000,000. 

Biggest change at First Run/Icarus in recent years: 

The continuing growth of the number of films we dis- 
tribute, the subject matters they address, and the mar- 
kets (as a result) that we are selling them to. 

Most important issue facing First Run/Icarus today: 

How to maintain strong growth while retaining what is 
good about what we are and how we do things now. 
That, and when and how to go digital. 

If you weren't distributing films, what would you be 
doing? 

Producing documentary films in South Africa (it's a long 
story!). 

Other (domestic or foreign) distributors you admire 
and why: 

Filmakers Library: they've been doing this even longer 
than I have, and they have good taste and a wonderful 
collection of films, too. Bullfrog Films: Important films, 
nice people, excellent work, committed and dedicated. 

If you could give independent filmmakers only one 
bit of advice it would be to . . . 

Watch a lot of films on the topic you are interested in; 



don't repeat what you have seen — do something that 
adds to the discussion, that is new and fresh. Make a 
well crafted (I don't mean it has to be "polished" at all) 
and structured film in a form and format (gauge) 
demanded by the story (don't use Hi8 just because it is 
less expensive). 

Upcoming titles to watch for: 
Eisenstein: The Master's House (Russian/German co- 
production), a great detailed film bio of the director, 
with stunning clips; Why Men Don't Iron, a three-part 
series about just that; The Underground Orchestra, a 
new film from Heddy Honigmann [O Amor Natural), 
opening at Film Forum. 

Famous last words: 

I am still excited about making a space for films that 
may not fit into the regular "channels" or "brandings" 
or "formats," that aren't necessarily on the list of top- 
ics that "work." I love it when I see a documentary that 
grabs my interest and holds it and that doesn't disap- 
point me in the end intellectually. If I can help get that 
film to an audience who values it for its craft and who 
can also use it constructively in what they do, I find that 
stimulating and rewarding. 



Ussa Gibbs is a contributing editor to The Independent and 
former Film Arts Foundation Fest director. 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 39 



riTlVSER FAQ. 



NAATA 



by Michelle Coe 

The National Asian American Telecommunications 
Association (NAATA), 346 Ninth St., 2nd fl., San 
Francisco, CA, 94103; (415) 863-0814; fax: 863- 
7428; www.naatanet.org; mediafund@naatanet.org 
Contact: Charles Kim, program officer; Janice 
Sakamoto, senior program officer. 



When was NAATA created? 

NAATA was created in 1980. In 1982, it secured fund- 
ing from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) 
to present Asian Pacific American programming to the 
PBS system. 

What is its on-going relationship to CPB? 

The taxpayer-supported CPB gives NAATA funding each 
year to re-grant to Asian American filmmakers with the 
goal of increasing the quality and quantity of Asian 
American works on public television. CPB funds are 
also used to acquire, package, and promote works on 
public television. 

What is the total amount of funding NAATA receives 
from CPB? 

$916,113 annually. 

The driving philosophy behind NAATA is . . . 

To present American audiences with accurate and real 
portrayals of historic and contemporary Asian American 
experiences. Even in this "enlightened" day and age. 
there continues to be a rash of stereotypical, inaccu- 
rate, and culturally insensitive images of Asian 
Americans in the theaters and on television. It is impor- 
tant that our own communities work to get our voices 
heard and our stories told. 

Are the projects NAATA funds broadcast on PBS? Do 
you have a regular series? 

Silk Screen was a series that NAATA presented to the 
PBS system from 1983 to 1987. No other series 
replaced Silk Screen. After that, we began submitting 
single programs and Asian Pacific American heritage 
month packages to the system directly. We submit pro- 
grams to national PBS. local stations, regional strands, 
and to series such as PO.V. 

Is there symbiosis between NAATA's other exhibition 
and distribution components and its funded pro- 
jects? 

Projects funded by NAATA are contractually obligated to 
screen in our San Francisco International Asian 
American Film Festival or another exhibition venue. 
NAATA holds special screenings throughout the year 




outside of the festival. For example, we program one 
night a month for an arts center here in San Francisco. 
We also use this relationship to help secure an educa- 
tional distribution agreement with the filmmaker, 
although this is not a contractual obligation. 

Is this educational distribution agreement through 
NAATA Distribution? 

Yes. NAATA Distribution is our self-sustained educa- 
tional distribution arm. It introduces high-quality works 
by and about Asian Pacific Americans to schools and 
universities, libraries, museums, and public television 
stations worldwide. 

What percentage of your overall funding goes 
towards film or video projects? 
75% of CPB funds. 

When and why did the NAATA Media and Open Door 
Completion Funds come into being? 

NAATA created the Media Fund in 1990 as a way of sup- 
plying Asian American programming to public television 
beyond acquiring completed works. 

The Completion Fund was created in 1996 as a way 
of quickly addressing filmmakers' postproduction needs 
while preparing the program for broadcast distribution. 

How many awards are given out per year for each 
fund? What is the total amount awarded annually? 

The amount and number vary from year to year. To give 
an example, in 1997, NAATA granted awards totaling 
$370,000 to 14 projects through our funding initiatives. 
This total doesn't include works we executive produce 
or support outside of these two funding programs. 

What is the average size of a grant? 

The average amount for both the Media and Open Door 
Funds is $30,000. 

What percent of applicants actually get funded? 

Approximately 10 to 15 percent. 

What are the restrictions on applicants' qualifica- 
tions (e.g., ethnicity, geography, medium)? 



The restrictions are as follows: that the project be of 
standard television length (in half-hour increments); 
that either the producer or the subject matter be Asian 
or Asian American; that the project meets PBS stan- 
dards for quality and content; that the project appeals 
to a wide variety of audiences, Asian American or oth- 
erwise; and that the project sheds light on the Asian 
American experience in a creative and educational way. 

Does NAATA fund projects at various stages of pro- 
duction (e.g., script , development, production, dis- 
tribution, etc.)? 

We currently fund only production and postproduction 
phases. 

Name some of the best known titles and/or artists 
NAATA has funded. 

AKA Don Bonus, by Spencer Nakasako (1996 Emmy 
Award); Picture Bride, by Kayo Hatta (Audience Award, 
1995 Sundance Film Festival); My America . . . or Honk 
if You Love Buddha, by Renee Ta|ima-Pena 
(Cinematography Award, 1997 Sundance Film 
Festival); Licensed to Kill, by Arthur Dong (Filmmaker's 
Trophy & Documentary Director's Award, 1997 
Sundance Film Festival); Maya Lin: A Strong Clear 
Vision, by Frieda Lee Mock (1996 Academy Award). 

Explain your funding cycle and deadlines. 

The Media Fund is a national open call for submissions 
that happens once a year, usually in the summer. A 
panel of filmmakers, public television programmers, 
and other professionals from the field meets in the late 
summer or early fall, and decisions are made in late 
fall. Contingent on the availability of funds, the 
Completion Fund has several deadlines throughout the 
year, usually at three-month intervals. Decisions are 
made within six weeks of the application deadline. 

Who are the Program Officers of the Media Fund? Of 
the Open Door Completion Fund? 

Janice Sakamoto and I administer both funds. 



40 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



Who makes the awards decisions? 

Media Fund submissions are judged by an independent 
panel of filmmakers, public television programmers, 
and other professionals from the field with some staff 
input. The Completion Fund is evaluated by the program 
committees of the NAATA staff and Board of Directors. 
Final decisions for both are approved by NAATA's Board 
of Directors. 




What advice do you have for media artists in putting 
forth a strong application? 

The proposal is very important. It must be clear, concise 
and well-written. You must be able to give the panel a 
clear sense of the project's stylistic treatment. Your 
proposal should have an engaging narrative structure 
and address story development and thematic threads in 
detail. Your proposal should not be weighed down with 
vague concepts or abstract ideas. If after reading it, we 
still have no idea what your film is about, then there's 
a problem. If you're doing a documen- 
tary about a topic that's been done 
often (e.g., Japanese internment 
camps), what sets yours apart 7 What 
makes it different from something 
that's been done before? This needs to 
be right at the top of your proposal. If 
it's buried, then you've already lost us. 
Pay attention to detail. Our panelists 
always notice if a budget is unrealistic, 
a concept isn't clear, or a filmmaker is 
in over his/her head. Also, if you're 
submitting a work-in-progress, it's 
very important to have a strong sam- 
ple tape or rough cut. 

What is the most common mistake 
applicants make? 

Having a budget that's unrealistic. 
This shows the filmmaker is inexperi- 
enced. 

What would people most be sur- 
prised to learn about NAATA and/or 
its founders? 

We do not give outright grants; we are 
buying the program's public television 
licensing rights, something similar to a 
pre-sale. As such, we are obligated to 
pass on requirements from CPB to our 
awardees. 

Other foundations or grantmaking 
organizations you admire. 

Paul Robeson for its progressive agen- 
da; ITVS for the diverse works it funds. 

Famous last words: 

Don't be discouraged. 

Funder F.A.Q. is a new column conducted 
by fax questionnaire profiling founda- 
tions, funding organizations, and 
financiers of independent film and video 
projects. If you are a funder and would 
like your organization or company to be 
profiled, contact: Michelle Coe at AIVF 
304 Hudson St., 6th fl„ New York, NY 
10013, or send an email to: michelle@ 
aivf.org. 

Michelle Coe is the program and 
information services director at AIVF. 



Finding Stock Footage 



with the help of creatively 
inspired researchers who 
really know their library 



takes Energy. 



the Largest a ,J Most Unique 

Collection /Original Cinematography 

m tA« World. 



FILM -LIBRARY 



1.800.IMAGERY/«r Your Most Valuable Resource 
http:// www.cligital-energy.com 



FILM VIDEO ARTS 



The Stomping Ground for 
Independent Giants! 

since 1968 



Courses 
Camera Rentals 

Avid 1000 

Digital Studio 

Video Edit Suites 

Flatbeds 

Dubs & Transfers 

Affordable Rates 




212.673.9361 

817 Broadway NYC 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 41 



FESTIVALS 



by Scott Castle 

listings do not constitute an endorsement. we 
recommend that you contact the festival 
directly before sending cassettes as details 
may change after the magazine goes to press, 
listings deadline: 1st of the month two months 
prior to cover date (april 1 for june issue), 
include festival dates, categories, prizes, 
entry fees, deadlines, formats & contact info, 
send to: festivals@aivf.org 

Domestic 

BALTIMORE'S QUEER FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL, September 
9-19. MD. Deadline: March 10. Fest accepting short & feature- 
length narrative, doc, experimental films, videos & animation. 
Submission format: 1/2" S-VHS, VHS or 3/4" Beta. Sole purpose 
of fest is to exhibit work by, about & of interest to lesbian, gay, 
bisexual and transgendered people from Baltimore & around 
the world. Contact: Chris Lines (410) 433-1395; queerfilm 
@juno.com ; www.bgp.org 

CHICAGO ALT.FILM FESTIVAL, June 9-13. IL. Deadline: April 9 
"Chicago's premiere film festival of American independent 
filmmakers." 2nd annual fest celebrates the best in indie films 
by emerging & established American filmmakers & provides a 
forum for exhibition, recognition & education. Films submitted 
for competition must be a Chicago premiere. Awards: best fea- 
ture, best director, best script, best performace by an actor or 
actress, best debut performance, best cinematography, best 
short & best doc. The Founder's Award will be given to the 
most-promising Midwest filmmaker. Entry fees: $40 features 
(75 min. & over); $20 shorts (under 60 min.) ; $30 docs. 
Formats: 16mm, 35mm & video. Entry form avail, on-line. 
Contact: CAFF, Entries, 3430 N. Lake Shore Drive, Ste. 19N, 
Chicago, IL 60657; (773) 525-4559; fax: 327-8669; chialtfilm 
@aol.com ; www.members.aol.com/chialtfilm/fest 

CRESTED BUTTE REEL FEST, August 12-15, CO. Deadline: May 
1 (regular); June 1 (student). A competitive fest focusing on 
short films under 60 min. in cats of animation, comedy, drama, 
experimental, doc & student. Awards: Tom Skerritt, Erin Skerritt 
& Crested Butte Brewery will present the "Gold and Silver 
Illumination Awards" of cash & a unique statue for exceptional 
merit in educational & humanitarian filmmaking. The "Bob 
Award" of $100 will be presented to the filmmaker who "push- 
es the envelope" the furthest. Gold & Silver "Best of Category" 
awards of $250 & $100 for each cat. plus many industry con- 
tacts. Entry fee: $30 (regular); $20 (student w/ proof of status). 
Preview on VHS. For more info & entry form, contact: Pat Crow, 
Box 1819, Crested Butte, CO 81224; (970) 349-7478; fax: 349- 
5626; cftarts@rmi.net; www.198.147.224.il/cftarts 

DOMINIQUE DUNNE MEMORIAL VIDEO COMPETITION AND 
FESTIVAL, May 16, CO. Deadline; Apr. 16. 29th yr of irt'l com- 
petition for originally produced videos by high school students, 
open to any student currently enrolled in high school grades 9- 
12 or college freshman entering a film produced w/in past 12 
mos. Entries must be sole work of student filmmaker or film- 
makers, w/ 2/3 original content. Awards in dramatic/narrative 
(8-24 min.), experimental (3-12 min.) & stop action/computer 
animated (non prize cat). Awards (one per cat; 6 total): 1st 



prize $100, 2nd prize $75, 3rd prize $50. Entry fee: $12 & 
SASE. Formats: 1/2 ". Contact: David Manley, fest coordinator, 
DDMVCF Fountain Valley School of Colorado, Colorado Springs, 
CO 80911; (719) 392-2657; fax: 391-9039; dunnefest@ 
ftnvalley.com 

GOLDEN SHOWER VIDEO FESTIVAL, June 11-12. TX. Deadline: 
April 28. Looking for experimental, narrative, animation, 
exploitative, doc, stolen & original videos for 5th annual fest. 
Prizes: 1st, lowrider bike; 2nd, mini accordion; 3rd, lucha libre 
gear. Format: VHS (under 30 min.). Entry fee: $10 cash only, no 
checks or money orders. No entries will be returned. An official 
entry form must accompany all entries; avail, for download 
from website. Contact; Adam Rocha, 8039 Callaghan Rd. 
#611, San Antonio, TX 78230; tel/fax: (512) 457-8780; voice- 
mail: (210) 885-5888; arocha@texas net.com; www.arocha. 
home.texas.net 

HOT SPRINGS DOCUMENTARY FILM FESTIVAL, Oct 8-17. AR. 
Deadline: April 30. 8th annual fest accepting nonfiction film 
submissions for one of the country's premier nonfiction film 
celebrations. Noncompetitive fest honors films and filmmakers 
each year in beautiful Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas. 
More than 70 films are screened, including the current year's 
Academy Award nominees in nonfiction categories and 
International Documentary Association honorees. Special guest 
scholars, filmmakers, and celebrities participate in humanities 
forums & lectures. Formats: 16mm, 35mm, VHS, Beta. Entry 
fee: $25 domestic, $35 international. Contact: Gretchen Taylor, 
HSDFF, 819 Central Avenue, Box 6450, Hot Springs National 
Park, AR 71902; (501) 321-4747; fax: 321-0211; 
hsdff@DocuFilmlnst.org; www.DocuFilmlnst.org 

INTERCOM INT'L COMMUNICATION FILM & VIDEO COM- 
PETETION, July. IL. Deadline: May. Oldest mt'l industrial film & 
video fest in US, now in 35th year. Aim is "to showcase enor- 
mous technical & creative energy behind sponsored prods & to 
highlight importance of media arts in business communica- 
tions". Industrial, sponsored & educational prods, eligible. Cats 
incl. dental science, doc. drug abuse, educational, environ- 
ment/ecology, fashion/music video, fundraismg, human rela- 
tions, medicine, personal counseling, public relations, public 
service & info, religion, research, safety, sales/marketing, 
sports/rec, training, travel/transportation & video news 
release. Special achievement awards to acting, cinematogra- 
phy/videography, computer graphics/animation, directing, edit- 
ing, graphics, humor, music, special effects & writing. Awards 
incl. Gold & Silver Hugos to top prods, in each cat. Gold & Silver 
Plaques may also be awarded in each competitive cat. Entries 
must be produced between preceding year & date of entry. All 
formats accepted. Entry fee: $35-$200. Contact: Intercom, 32 
West Randolph St., Ste 600, Chicago, IL 60601; (312) 425- 
9400; fax: 425-0944; filmfest@suba.com; www.chicago. 
ddbn.com/filmfest 

INTERNATIONAL JEWISH VIDEO & FILM COMPETITION, CA. 

Deadline: April 15. 6th annual competition accepts entries on 
Jewish themes from every level & cat of prod, incl. audio & 
interactive media. Awards: Jurors' Choice (share $750); Jurors' 
Citation (share $500), Directors' Choice (share $250); 
Honorable Mention (certificate & screenings); Lindheim Award 
for program that best explores political & social relationship 
between Jews & other ethnic & religious groups. Winners 
screened at Magnes Museum for 2 months; plus cable & other 
venues. All original formats including film accepted. Preview on 



VHS (NTSC). Eligible films produced w/in preceding 3 1/2 yrs & 
be under 100 min. Entry fee $30 (under 30 min.), $40 (over 30 
min. For entry form e-mail or send SASE to: Bill Chayes, Video 
Competition Coordinator, Judah L. Magnes Museum, 2911 
Russell St., Berkeley, CA 94705; (510) 549-6952 or fa* 849- 
3673; jewsvideo@aol.com 

MARTHA'S FLAVOR FEST, Aug. 15-21, MA. Deadlines: April 30 
(early); May 30 (late). Held on island of Martha's Vineyard, fest 
provides platform for indie black films & filmmakers behind 
them through symposia, script readings & public events. Focus 
is to increase awareness, support & recognition within world of 
indie black filmmaker & heighten diversity of indie black films. 
Fest accepts material from any filmmaker who demonstrates 
creative abilities within black cinema. A new event, "Practicing 
the Pitch," gives filmmakers the opportunity to pitch their pro- 
jects to industry executives. The 1999 Script Competition will 
award winner with cash & prizes & showcase winning script as 
part of the "Evening Script Reading Series". Application fees 
("Pitch" & script competition entered separately): $30 (early), 
$45 (late). The 1999 Feature & Short Film Competition will 
award the winner with cash & prizes. Formats: 16mm & 35mm. 
Entry fees: Shorts $25 (early), $40 (late); Features $30 (early), 
$45 (late). For appl. & info: (973) 669-8683; fa* 669-1282; 
cmpnyc@msn.com; www.marthasflavorfest.com 

NEW YORK VIDEO FESTIVAL, July 16-22, NY Deadline: March 
19. Originally presented as part of the New York Film Festival, 
this noncompetitive fest is now an independent project, pre- 
sented in association with the Lincoln Center's summer fest. It 
aims to present the latest in electronic arts & includes video. 
HDTV & CD-ROM. All videos shown are single channel, project- 
ed in the Film Society's 268-seat Walter Reade Theater at 
Lincoln Center. Multi-channel video installations are on view in 
the theater's Furman gallery. There are no categories or 
awards. Average of 40 works presented in 14 programs; cover- 
age in NY Times & Village Voice, as well as out-of-town & int'l 
coverage. Submitted works should be recent (w/in past two 
years); New York premieres preferred, but not required. 
Formats: 3/4", 1/2", Beta, CD-ROM. Preview on 3/4", 1/2", CD- 
ROM (for pc). Please do not submit preview in Beta, though 
Beta is preferred format for screening. No entry fee. Do not send 
masters; tapes not returned. Entry from avail, from website. 
Contact: NYVF, Film Society of Lincoln Center, 70 Lincoln Center 
Plaza, NY, NY 10023; (212) 875-5610; fax: 875-5636; film- 
linc@dti.net; www.filmlinc.com 

NORTH CAROLINA GAY AND LESBIAN FILM FESTIVAL, August, 
NC. Deadline: May 1. 5th year fest aims to open up audiences 
to wide spectrum of films by and/or about gay/lesbian/bisexu- 
al/transgender lives. NCGLFF also produces various events 
leading up until festival. Films shown in Durham's Carolina 
Theatre. Fest accepts features, docs and shorts of any length, 
genre or category. No restriction on films' year of completion. 
Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 1/2". Entry fee: $15. For entry 
form or more info, contact: Lawrence Ferber, NCGLFF 
Coordinator, 1200E Schaub Dr., Raleigh, NC 27606; (919) 859- 
9831; fax: 233-9299; NY office: (718) 369-0601; 
NCGLFF@aol.com 

PHILADELPHIA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, July 19-25, 
PA. Deadline: April 1. Philafilm is calling for entries in 22nd 
annual fest that seeks to provide an int'l forum for the presen- 
taion, critique & distribution of indie film & video productions. 
This year's theme is "PhilaFilm and the Century of Film." Cats: 



42 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



features, shorts, docs, anima- 
tion, exp, TV series, super 8, 
student work, music videos. 
Awards: certificates, trophies & 
cash. Format: 35mm, 16mm, 
super 8, 1/2" VHS, 3/4" U- 
Matic. Entry fees: $25 (super 8, 
student); $50 (all films 84 mm. 
& under); $100 (all films 85 
min. & over). Preview on VHS. 
Contact: Philafilm, Int'l Assoc, 
of Motion Picture & TV Pro- 
ducers, 2623 Sorrento Dr., Suite 
A, Philadelphia, PA 19131; 
(215) 879-8209; fax: 879-3026 



SOPHOMORE EFFORT 
IN WINDY CITY 



Although too new to have developed 
an identity, the Chicago AltFilm 
Festival does have a clear inten- 
tion. (And a distinctive trophy: a 
replica of Picasso's famous sculp- 
ture in Daley Plaza.) It was recently 
conceived by Chicago filmmaker 
Dennis Neal Vaughn to fill what he 
saw as a void in the Chicago festi- 
val scene. With many of the local 
fests bearing prefixes like Inter- 
national, Latino & Underground, the 
idea was to focus on American 
indies and their films. Accepting 
features, docs & shorts in film, 
video & digital formats, AltFilm 
touts the fact that they have well 
rounded industry support from folks 
like DGA, SAG, IFP/ Midwest as well 
as Kodak & Planet Hollywood. Looking 
ahead, the festival's plans include touring 
select films from the festival throughout 
Illinois and the Midwest 



Francke, Director, Edinburgh Int'l Film 
Fest, Filmhouse, 88 Lothian Road, 
Edinburgh, EH3 9BZ, Scotland, United 



WEST PALM BEACH INDEPEN- 
DENT FILM FESTIVAL, May 28- 

30, FL. Deadline: April 1. 4th 
annual fest was created to 
encourage & showcase innova- 
tive, short independent works 
from new, independent, and low 
budget film & videomakers. 
Send VHS tapes of original film l^^^"^^^^*""E 
& video works of 30 min. or less 
in categories of fiction, doc, music video, experimental, and 
animation. Entry fee: $15. Please incl. SASE if you would like 
tapes returned. Award prizes include raw filmstock & equip- 
ment. Contact: WPBIFR 222 Lakeview Ave., Suite 160-284, 
West Palm Beach, FL, 33401; (561) 802-3029, fax: 655-4190; 
www.wpbiff.org. 

WINE COUNTRY FILM FESTIVAL, July 22-Aug. 15, CA. 
Deadline: May 1. In 13th yr, fest features competitive & non- 
competitive programs in the heart of California's wine country, 
60 miles north of S.F Program of over 100 films from around 
the world in theaters & outdoor venues in Napa and Sonoma 
Valleys. Open to features, shorts, docs & animation. Awards 
incl. Blockbuster Short Film Competition, David Wolper Doc. 
Prize, First Feature Prize, Best of Fest & Robert Mondavi Peace 
Prize for film best promoting goodwill & cultural understanding. 
Formats: 35mm, 16mm, some video. Entry fee $30. All sub- 
missions on 1/2". Contact: WCFF, 12000 Henno Rd., Box 303, 
Glen Ellen, CA 95442; (707) 996-2536; fax: 996-6964; wcfilm- 
fest@aol.com; www.winezone.com 

Foreign 

EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL August, 
Scotland. Deadline: Mid May. "Fest of discovery, celebration of 
cinema, centre of debate, & catalyst for new directors & first 
films." Began in 1947 as a doc film fest & is particularly inter- 
ested in non-fiction; also premieres. Showcases about 110 
new features and 120 new shorts each yr ; shows live action & 
animated shorts before every film in every section. In 1995 ini- 
tiated New British Expo, a market & talent spotting showcase 
for British film. All films screened to public audiences except 
NBX; also screenings for press, delegates & attending guests. 
Awards go to Best New British Feature, Best British Animation 
plus Standard Life Audience Award, Channel Four Director's 
Award, Observer Documentary Award and Pathe Performance 
Award. Formats: 70mm, 35mm, 16mm, Beta. Preview on 1/2" 
(VHS). Entry fee: £10-£80, depending on budget. Lizzie 




Kingdom; teh Oil 44 131 228 4051; fax: 
Oil 44 131 229 5501; info@edfilm 
fest.org.uk; www.edfilmfest.org.uk 



FESTIVAL OF NATIONS, June 20-26, 
Ebensee, Austria. Deadline: April 1. All 
noncommercial films & videos qualified to participate. Please 
enclose short description of film. Film/video must be complet- 
ed within the last two years. Duration of film is limited to 30 
min. Films rated by int'l jury. Formats: 16mm, super 8, VHS, S- 
VHS. Awards: "Ebenseer Bear" in gold, silver and bronze. The 
Austrian Science and art Minister Prize: AT 3,000. "Special 
Award for Best Film" of the Competition: The author (or one 
member of the team) will receive an invitation to participate 
free of charge in the festival in the next year. Special Award for 
best experimental film. UNICA-Medaille Certificate for every 
participant. Contact: Erich Riess, Abergstrasse 82, A-4060 
Lmz, Austria; tel/fax: Oil 43 732 673 693 

HUESCA IBEROAMERICAN AND INTERNATIONAL SHORT 
FILM FESTIVAL, June 3-12, Spain. Deadline: April 1. Founded 
in 1973, competitive showcase for Spanish & foreign short 
films has aim of "the dissemination of image as a contribution 
to the better knowledge & fraternity among the nations of the 
world." Awards: "Ciudad de Huesca" Golden Danzante 
(1,000,000 ptas); Silver Danzante (500,000 ptas); Bronze 
Danzante (250,000 ptas.). Other awards: Award "Sociedad 
General de Autores y Editores" for best script; Award 
"Francisco Garcia De Paso" to short film that best emphasizes 
human values; Award "Casa de America" to best new director 
(their first or second production in 16mm or 35mm). No the- 
matic restrictions except no films dealing w/ tourism or public- 
ity. Entries must be unawarded in other fests in Spain, pro- 
duced in 1998 or 1999 & be under 30 min. Of approx. 400 
entries received each year, about 170 shown. Formats: 35mm, 
16mm. Entry fee: None. Contact: Jose Maria Escriche Otal, 
Comite de Direccion, Festival International Cortos "Ciudad de 
Huesca", C/ Parque 1, 2, 22002 Huesca// Apartado 174, 
22080 Huesca, Spain; teh Oil 34 974 21 25 82; fax: 34 974 
21 00 65; huescafest@tsai.es; www.huesca-filmfestival.com 

HUNGARIAN MULTICULTURAL CENTER FILM AND VIDEO 
FESTIVAL, Sept. 20-22, Hungary. Deadline: Apr. 28. 3rd annu- 
al fest accepts film, video (PAL) & animated works. Include 




STUDENTS: CALL FOR ENTRIES 

How is POPULATION GROWTH affecting 

CONSUMPTION • ENVIRONMENT • SUSTAINABIUTY 

$10,000 IN PRIZES 

NO ENTRY FEE 

TV EXPOSURE 'NATIONAL TOUR 

For more information, a resource guide and 
a copy of the video Best of Festival , contact: 
WPFVF • 46 Fox Hill Road, Bernardston, MA 

01337 • TL: 800 638-9464 • FX: 41 3 648-9204 

eM; info@wplvf.com • www.wpfvf.com 

Sponsored by Sopris Foundation, Searchlight 

Films & Population Communications International 



AVID 



New MC 7.1 PCI 

FEATURES 

SHORTS 

DOCUMENTARIES 

BROADCAST COMMERCIALS 

DEMO REELS 

MUSIC VIDEOS 

CORPORATE VIDEOS 



Editorial Services with 
experienced cutting-edge editors 



OFFLINE/ONLINE 

AVR up to 77 

Beta SP/VHS/TC DAT 

After Effects & 3D Effects 



HOURLY/DAILY/WEEKLY RATES 



MERCI MEDIA, INC. 

143 WEST 29TH STREET, 

SUITE 902 

NEW YORK, NY 10001 

VOICE: 212/563 0210 

FAX: 212/563 0221 

mercient@mercient.com 

www.mercient.com 




AA 



l/\ 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 43 




CALL 



F O R 



E N T R 



E S 



4TH ANNUAL STONY BROOK FILM FESTIVAL 

Staller Center for the Arts 

State University at Stony Brook, New York 

Competitions in 1 6mm and 35mm films 
including features, shorts, documentary 
and animation. Largest film screen in the 
region (40 ft. wide) in dolby stereo sound! 
Previous guests and honorees include 
Steve Buscemi, Rod Steiger, Eli Wallach 
and Cliff Robertson. 

For more information, call 516-632-7233 

or email pcohen@notes.cc.sunysb.edu 

Entry forms are available online at www.stallercenter.com/festival 

or write to: Stony Brook Film Festival, Staller Center for the Arts, 

rm 2032, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 1 1 794-5425. 




long & short form nonlinear editing 

online/offline, motion graphics, film 



affordable 

rates for 

independents! 



65 st marks place, suite 16, nyc 10003 David Chmura, editor 



n^i.^,, ~ FILM & VIDEO 
i/CLOUr 212-228-1914 



FESTIVALS 



English text of work & a brief bio, for PR & program book. Work 
must be under 30 min. in length and been completed in 
1997/1998. Preview on VHS (NTSC), include SASE for return. 
Entry fee: $35. Entries must be postmarked no later than April 
12. Contact: Hungarian Multicultural Center, Inc., 6723 Forest 
Lane, Dallas, TX 75230. Or Beata Szechy, tel/fax: (972) 308- 
8191; bszechy@mail.smu.edu 

INTERNATIONAL FILMFESTIVAL CINEMATOGRAPH. June 2-9, 
Austria. Deadline: March 15. Now in 8th year, test presents 50 
films produced in Africa, N. & S. America. This year's retro: 
"From Eisenstein to Marcos — Indigenas in Mexico." Submitted 
films must be Austrian premiere, with no screenings anywhere 
prior to June 4, 1997. Presence of one member of production 
at festival. Freight charges to test borne by producer; return 
charges borne by festival. Cats: feature, short, doc, animation. 
Formats: 35mm & 16mm. Contact: IFFC, Museumstr. 31, Box 
704, A-6020, Innsbruck, Austria; 01 1 43 512 580723; fax: Oil 
43 512 581762; cinematograph@www.tirolkultur.at; 
www.tirolkultur.at/cinematograph 

INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL FOR CHILDREN & YOUNG 

PEOPLE, July 5-16, Uruguay. Deadline: May 7. 8th annual 
test presents overview of new films for children & adolescents, 
facilitates access to best & most diverse material created 
today & encourages distribution of new films for children. 
Awards incL prizes for best fiction, animation, doc ; Guri Prize 
for best of test, UNICEF Prize, to best film/video promoting the 
rights of a child; OCIC Prize, best film/video enhancing human 
values, and Children's Jury Award. Entries cannot have been 
shown in Uruguay and must include; complete tech info, five- 
line synopsis of work, dialogue script in English or Portuguese 
& VHS copy of film. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, S-VHS, Betacam 
SR VHS (NTSC & PAL). Contact: Cinemateca Uruguaya, Lorenzo 
Carnelli 1311, 11200 Montevideo, Uruguay; fax: Oil 598 2 
409 4572; cinemuy@chasque.apc.org 

JERUSALEM FILM FESTIVAL July 8-17, Israel. Deadline; Apr. 
15. 16th annual test will screen over 175 films in various cats, 
including int'l cinema, doc, shorts, animation, avant garde, US 
indie, Israeli & Mediterranean cinema; Jewish themes, restora- 
tions & classics. Awards inch Wolgin Awards for Israeli cine- 
ma, Upper Award for best Israeli script; (Int'l competition: Wim 
van Leer In the Spirit of Freedom Award, Jewish Theme Award 
& Mediterranean Cinema). Must be Israeli premieres. Formats: 
35mm, 16mm, video. No entry fee. Contact: Lia van Leer, 
Director. Box 8561, Derech Hebron 11, Box 8561, Jerusalem 
91083; tel; Oil 972 2 671-5117 or 672-4131; fax: 673-3076; 
festival@jer-cin.org.il; www.jer.cine. org.il 

KARLOVY VARY INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, July 2-10, 
Czech Republic. Deadline; April. Annual FIAPF-recognized 
competitive fest, founded in 1946. Held at one of world's old- 
est & most famous spas, fest is one of largest film events in 
central Europe. Feature competition & Doc competition (fea- 
ture-length & shorts) accompanied by several noncompetitive 
sections. Competition entries must have be completed since 
Jan. 1 of previous yr & not have competed in other int'l tests. 
Awards: Grand Prize of Crystal Globe, Special Jury Award, Best 
Director Prize, Best Actor/Actress & Lifetime Achievement 
Award. Formats: 35mm only. Entry fee: None. Contact: Jiri 
Bartoska, Karlovy Vary Int'l Film Festival, Panska 1, 110 00 
Prague 1. Czech Republic; Oil 420 2 24 23 54 13; fax: Oil 
420 2 24 23 34 08. 



44 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, July 22-Aug. 
8, Australia. Deadline: March 5 (shorts); April 2 (features). 
FIAPF-recognized test celebrates 48th anniv. as one of 
Australia's largest, and its oldest, fests. Eclectic mix of indie 
work, w/ special interest in feature docs & shorts. Substantial 
program of new Australian cinema. Int'l short film competition 
important part of test, w/ cash prizes in 7 cats: Grand Prix City 
of Melbourne Award for Best Film ($5,000) & $2,000 each in 
best Australian, experimental, animated, doc & fiction film 
cats. Add'l special awards inch Kino Cinemas Award for cre- 
ative excellence in Australian short film ($2,500). Open to 
films of all kinds, except training & ads. Films 30 min. or less 
eligible for Int'l Short Film Competition; films over 60 min. eli- 
gible for noncompetitive feature program. Video & super 8 pro- 
ductions considered for "out-of-competition" screenings. 
Entries must have been completed w/in previous yr & not 
screened in Melbourne or broadcast on Australian TV. Fest use- 
ful window to Australian theatrical & nontheatrical outlets, 
educ distributors & Australian TV. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 
3/4", 1/2", super 8. Preview on VHS (NTSC or PAL). Entry fee: 
$20. Contact: Sandra Sdraulig, exec, dir., MIFF, Box 2206, 
Fitzroy VIC 3065 Australia; 011 61 3 417 2011; fax: 011 61 3 
417 3804; miff@netspace.net.au; www.cinemedia.net/MIFF 

MUNICH FILM FESTIVAL, June 26-July 3, Germany. Deadline: 
May 1. Fee: none. Open to all genres w/ awards for Best Int'l 
TV Film, as well as special awards for German filmmakers. 
Formats: 35mm, 16mm. Contact: Eberhard Hauff, Director, 
Filmfest Munchen, Kaiserstr. 39, D-80801 Munchen, Germany; 
011 49 89 38 19040; fax: 011 49 89 38 190426. 



ODENSE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, Aug 16-21, 
Denmark. Deadline: April 1. 14th annual fest is organized by 
city of Odense & Danish Film Institute. It is designed to screen 
unusual short films w/ an original & imaginative sense of cre- 
ative delight as found in the works of Hans Christian Anderson 
Cats: Experimental-imaginative & fairy tale. Films must not 
exceed 45 min. Film must have been completed on or after May 
1, 1998. Educational, advertising & tourist films cannot com- 
pete. Awards: Grand Prix, most imaginative, most surprising & 
special jury prizes. Formats: 16mm & 35mm. Preview on VHS 
Entries must include: entry form, one still photo & complete 
dialogue list in English. Contact: OIFF, Vindegade 18, DK-5000 
Odense C, Denmark; 011 45 6613 1372 x.4044 ; fax: 45 6591 
4318; filmfestival@post.odkomm.dk; www.filmfestival.dk 

PESARO FILM FESTIVAL, Mid-June, Italy. Deadline: March 31. 
35th annual festival, The "New Cinema" program includes: 
features, shorts, fiction, nonfiction, experimental, animation 
works on film (35/16mm) and on video (U-matic, Betacam) 
production requirements: Italian premiere, completion after 
January 1st, 1998. Festival is non-competitive. There is entry 
form or fee for entries. Send a VHS tape, any standard, (if not 
English or French spoken or subtitled, enclose dialogue list in 
one of these languages) to: Mostra Int. Nuovo Cinema, Via 
Villafranca 20, 00185 Rome, Italy; pesarofilmfest@mclmk.it 

ST. PETERSBURG "MESSAGE TO MAN" FESTIVAL, July 17-24 
Russia. Deadline: April 10. Accepts feature doc (up to 120 
min.), short doc (up to 40 min.), short fiction (up to 60 mm.), 
animated films (up to 60 mm.). Program mcl. best debut (1st 
professional as well as student films), int'l competition & spe- 
cial programs. Entries must have been completed after Jan., 



1998. Cash awards. Formats: 35mm, 16mm. Preview on 1/2" 
VHS. Entry fee: $35. Contact in US: Anne Bonn, c/o Donnell 
Media Center, 10 W 53rd St., NY, NY 10019; (212) 586-6367; 
fax: 586-6391; Contact: Mikhail Litviakov, SPIFF, 12 
Karavannaya 191011, St. Petersburg, Russia; tel: Oil 7 812 
235 2660; fax: Oil 7 812 235 3995. 

VILA DO CONDE INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM FESTIVAL, 

July 6-11, Portugal. Deadline: April 23. 7th annual fest accept- 
ing films under 40 mm. produced in 1998 or 1999. Cats: fic- 
tion, doc, animation. Awards: Grand Prize in each category of 
a trophy, diploma & PTE500.000; Prize of the Audience, trophy 
& PTE300.000. Preview on VHS. If film has dialogue in lan- 
guages other than English, French, Spanish or Portugese & it is 
not subtitled in any of these languages, include translated 
script. Extracts of accepted films may be broadcast on TV 
channels for festival publicity. Entry form required & avail, on 
website. Contact: Auditorio Municipal, Praca da Republica, 
4480-715 Vila do Conde, Portugal; Oil 351 52 641644; fax: 
351 52 642871; isffviladoconde@mailtelepac.pt; www. 
ficm-vc.bsi.net 

WELLINGTON FILM FESTIVAL/AUCKLAND INTERNATIONAL 
FILM FESTIVAL, July, New Zealand. Deadline: late April. 
Noncompetitive fest, now in 28th year. From core program of 
120 features (& as many shorts), fest simultaneously presents 
Auckland & Wellington Film Festivals & programs that travel to 
cities of Dunedin & Chnstchurch. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 
Beta. No entry fee. Contact: Bill Gosden, NZFF, Box 9544, Te 
Aro, Wellington, New Zealand; tel: 01 1 64 4 385 0162; fax: 01 1 
64 4 801 7304; enzedff@actrix.gen.nz; www.enzedff.co.nz 



The Independent Feature Project 
in association with the 
Writers Guild of America, East presents 

FROM SCRIPT 
TO SCREEN 

A conference on screenplay development 

April 9-11, 1999 




IFP 



Fashion Institute of Technology, New York City 



For a brochure and application form call the Independent Feature Project at (212) 465 8244 ext: 801 
or download from IndieLink, IFP's website www.ifp.org. after March 1, 1999. 



Sponsored by 



iVOICE 




March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 45 



NOTICES 



NOTICES OF RELEVANCE TO AIVF MEMBERS ARE LIST- 
ED FREE OF CHARGE AS SPACE PERMITS. THE 
INDEPENDENT RESERVES THE RIGHT TO EDIT FOR 
LENGTH AND MAKES NO GUARANTEES ABOUT THE 
NUMBER OF PLACEMENTS FOR A GIVEN NOTICE. LIMIT 
SUBMISSIONS TO 60 WORDS & INDICATE HOW LONG 
INFO WILL BE CURRENT. DEADLINE: 1ST OF THE 
MONTH, TWO MONTHS PRIOR TO COVER DATE (E.G., 
APRIL 1 FOR JUNE ISSUE). COMPLETE CONTACT INFO 
(NAME, ADDRESS & PHONE) MUST ACCOMPANY ALL 
NOTICES. SEND TO: INDEPENDENT NOTICES, FIVF, 304 
HUDSON ST., 6TH FL, NY, NY 10013. WE TRY TO BE AS 
CURRENT AS POSSIBLE, BUT DOUBLE-CHECK BEFORE 
SUBMITTING TAPES OR APPLICATIONS. 



Competitions 

buck henry screenwriting scholarship: two $500 

scholarships to support work of students enrolled in 
Screenwriting course of study. Sold or optioned scripts ineli- 
gible. Contact: American Film Institute (213) 856-7690: 
www.afionline.org 

F.0.CU.S. INSTITUTE OF FILM call for screenplays: "original, 
compelling human stories that promote positive values & 
social responsibility — material that endeavors to stir the 
human spirit." Deadline: June 1. 2-5 screenwriters selected 
for mentorship program & one script will go into production. 
Proceeds from release of films produced by FO.C.U.S. will 
est. academic & vocational scholarship funds for underpriv- 
ileged foster children. Info & appl. materials available by fax- 
ing name, address & tel. to: (310) 472-1481 or go to 
www.focusinstituteoffilm.com 

SCREENWRITERS: Film Factory is currently seeking original 
feature-length screenplays to produce in 1999. Please send 
treatments or scripts to: FILM FACTORY, c/o Dominic 
Giannetti & Harry Glen, M.D, 103 US Hwy, Ste. 209. Jupiter, 
FL 23477. Others interested (actors, crew, etc.) please send 
head shots and/or resumes. 

TREATMENTS FOR DOCUMENTARY FILMS not more than 10 
pgs, sought by working independent doc filmmakers. 
Contact: Cinnabar Pictures, 62 White St., New York, NY 
10013; (212) 334-6838. 

Conferences • Workshops 

AVID FEATURE FILM CAMP and Avid Short Film Camp: 

Digital Media accepting submissions for its 1999 Filmcamps. 
Filmcamp offers free nonlinear postproduction on feature 
films and shorts. Editors-in-training, under the supervision of 
an experienced feature editor, learn postproduction on multi- 
ple Avid Media Composers while editing your film. Thirteen 
features and four shorts will be accepted before the end of 
1999. Principal photography and transfer must be completed 
on feature-length film (70+ min.) or short (70- mm.). Can 
be doc, narrative, or experimental. Contact: Jaime Fowler, 
AFFC director, (503) 297-2324; www.filmcamp.com 

CONTENT '99, May 19-21. The National Educational Media 
Network presents 13th Annual Media Market and biennial 



Conference for producers an distributors. The Market — the 
only one in the nation devoted exclusively to educational 
works — seeks submissions by film/video producers. Early 
bird deadline: March 15; regular deadline: April 27. At the 
biennial conference, attendees learn the latest trends in pro- 
duction, distribution and exhibition. Early bird deadline: April 
19. Rates vary; discounts available for '99 Apple Awards 
Competition entrants. CONTENT will culminate in the 29th 
Annual Apple Awards Film & Video Festival (May 21-22) at 
the Oakland Museum of California. For brochure & applica- 
tion contact: NEMN, 655 13th St., Ste. 100, Oakland, CA 
94612; (510) 465-6885; fax: (510) 465-2835; content® 
nemn.org; www.nemn.org 

Films • Tapes 

AIR YCUR SHORTS: new public access cable show seeks 
short films to run & filmmakers to interview. No pay, just sat- 
isfaction & publicity of having films aired. Sean (714) 723- 
6740; http://members.aol.com/ShortFilmz 

THE AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE is accepting entries for its 
ongoing program, The Alternative Screen: A Forum for 
Independent Film Exhibition and Beyond. Send submissions 
on 1/2" VHS tape. Feature-length independent film, docu- 
mentary and new media projects wanted. 1800 N. Highland, 
Ste. 717, L.A.. CA 90028. For more info, call (213) 466-FILM. 

A.R.C. GALLERY reviewing for solo & group exhibitions. All 
media including video, performance & film. Send SASE for 
prospectus to: ARC Gallery, 1040 W. Huron, Chicago, IL 
60622 or call (312) 733-2787. 

ASHLAND CABLE ACCESS seeks video shows. VHS, S-VHS & 
3/4" OK, any length or genre. For return, incl. sufficient SASE. 
Send w/ description & release to: Suzi Aufderheide, Southern 
Oregon State College, RVTV, 1250 Siskiyou Blvd., Ashland, OR 
97520; (541) 552-6898. 

BALLYHOO!: Central Florida TV show featuring independent 
film and filmmakers is accepting films & videos under 30 
min. Hour-long community access show produced by 
Frameworks Alliance, a non-profit organization that also pro- 
duces the Central Florida Film & Video Festival. Each 
Ballyhoo! episode aired twice weekly for one month to over 
700,000 viewers. Submit VHS tape and return postage to 
Frameworks Alliance, c/o Sean Wilson at 1906 E. Robinson 
St. Orlando. FL 32803. (407) 839-6045; fax: 898-0504. 

BIG FILM SHORTS is now accepting short films, any genre, 
for worldwide distribution. Details at www.bigfilmshorts.com 
or for info: (818)563-2633. 

THE BIT SCREEN premieres original short films, videos and 
multimedia works made specifically for the Internet. Looking 
for original films scaled in both plot line and screen ratio for 
the Internet; films that challenge the assumption of band- 
width limitations. Want to define the look of a new medium 7 
For submission guidelines, check out: www.lnPhiladelphia. 
com/TheBitScreen 

BLACKCHAIR PRODUCTIONS, in its 4th year, accepting 
video, film and computer-art submissions on an ongoing 
basis for monthly screening program called "Independent 
Exposure." Artists paid an honorarium. Looking for experi- 
mental, erotic, humorous, dramatic, narrative, subversive, 



animation & underground works, but will review anything for 
possible screening. Submit a VHS (or S-VHS) , clearly labeled 
w/ name, title, length, phone number along w/ any support 
materials, incl. photos. Also include $5 entry fee which will be 
returned if your work is not selected. Include SASE if you wish 
the work(s) to be returned. Send submissions to: Blackchair 
Productions. 2318 Second Ave.. #313-A, Seattle, WA 
98121. Info/details: (206) 568-6051, joel@speakeasy.org; 
www.speakeasy.org/blackchair 

CABLE SHOWCASE seeks productions. Send 1/2" or 3/4" 
tapes to: Bob Neuman, Program Director, Laurel Cable 
Network, 8103 Sandy Spring Road, Laurel, Maryland 20707. 
Tapes cannot be returned. 

CHICAGO ADULT AMATEUR VIDEO FESTIVAL celebrates the 
worlwide free speech of diverse sexually-oriented lifestyles 
through showcasing all genres of erotic video. Accepting all 
genres, under 40 mm., 1/2" NTSC or PAL versions. Request 
info: CAAVF, 2501 N. Lincoln Ave., #198, Chicago, IL 60614- 
2313; (312) 910-5224; caavf@juno.com; www.elsenent.er- 
tainment.com/xxx 

THE CINELINGUA SOCIETY seeks short & feature-length 
European films on video for language project, preferably 
without subtitles. We desire only limited rights. Contact: 
Brian Nardone, RO. Box 8892, Aspen, CO 81612; (970) 925- 
2805; fax: 925-9880; briann@rof.net; www.rof.net/yp/cine 
lingua.html 

DOBOY'S DOZENS seeks short films for monthly showcases 
highlighting works by up & coming filmmakers. Contact: 
Eugene Williams or Marceil Wright, Doboy's Dozens, 1525 N. 
Cahuonga Blvd. #39, Hollywood, CA 90028; (213) 293-6544. 

DOCUMENTAL, doc. and exp bimonthly film video series at 
LA's historic Midnight Special bookstore, accepting entries of 
any length. Contact: Gerry Fialka (310) 306-7330. 

DOMESTIC HOME VIDEO LABEL seeks films of all genres for 
possible distribution. Send VHS screening tapes and press 
kits to: Screen Pix Home Video, Attn: David Eddy, 172 
Honeywell Corners Rd„ Broadaldm, NY 12025. 

DUTV-CABLE 54, a progressive, nonprofit access channel in 
Philadelphia, seeks works by indie producers. All genres & 
lengths considered. No payment. Will return tapes. VHS, S- 
VHS, 3/4" accepted. Contact: George Mc Collough or Debbie 
Rudman, DUTV-Cable 54, 3141 Chestnut St., Bldg 9B, Rm 
4026, Philadelphia, PA 19104; (215) 895-2927; 
dutv@post.drexel.edu; www.httpsrv.ocs.drexel.edu/~dutv/ 

EXHIBITION OPPORTUNITIES tor the 99-00 exhibition sea- 
son. All media considered including 2-D, 3-D, performance, 
video, and computer art. Send resume, 20 slides or compa- 
rable documentation, SASE to: University Art Gallery. 
Wightman 132, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Ml 



EXHIBIT YOUR FILMS AT GRAND ILLUSION. Seattle s 

Northwest Film Forum seeks 16mm & 35mm shorts (60 mm. 
or less) for ongoing exhibition. Selected works shown before 
regular programming at Seattle's only md. arthouse theater. 
Send video & SASE to NWFF c/o Grand Illusion, 1403 NE 50th 
St., Seattle, WA 98105. 

FINISHING PICTURES accepting shorts & works-in-progress 
seeking distribution or exposure to financial resources for 



46 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



CLIPS, quarterly showcase presented to invited audience of 
industry professionals. Deadline: Ongoing. Contact: Tommaso 
Fiacchino, (212) 971-5846. 

FLOATING IMAGE seeks film/video animation & shorts for 
public/commercial TV program. Send VHS or SVHS to Floating 
Image Productions, Box 7017, Santa Monica, CA 90406 (incl. 
SASE for return). (310) 313-6935; www.artnet.net/~floating 
image 

"FUNNY SHORTS" requests submissions of funny short films 
for new syndicated TV show. Shorts maybe on film or video & 
must be no longer than 20 min. Students, amateurs & pro- 
fessionals welcome. Cash & prizes will be awarded for films 
chosen for broadcast. Tapes not returnable. Send entries on 
VHS to: Funny Shorts c/o Vitascope, Box 24981, New 
Orleans, LA 70184-4981. 

IN THE COMPANY OF WOMEN: Public access TV show fea- 
turing the works of women filmmakers. All lengths welcome. 
Send VHS copy, filmmakers bio, and SASE to: In the Company 
of Women, 139 E. 89th St., Brooklyn, NY 11236. 

KINOFIST IMAGEWORKS seeks work with relevance to alter- 
native youth culture for screening and distribution within the 
underground community. DIY, exp. & activist work encour- 
aged. Send VHS, SASE to Kinofist Imageworks, Box 1102, 
Columbia, MO 65205; dmwF92@hamp.hampshire.edu 

KNITTING FACTORY VIDEO LOUNGE seeks VHS tapes for 
ongoing bi-weekly series. Any genre or subject. Send tape w/ 
brief bio and SASE to: Knitting Factory Video Lounge, Box 
1220 Canal Street Station, New York, NY 10013. Info: 
kf_vl@hotmail.com 

MIDNIGHT MATINEE seeks alternative videos for monthly 
cable access show on Maui. Possible Hawaiian distribution. 
Any topics, genres; the more "out there," the better. Send 
SVHS or VHS copy & release w/ SASE. Paradise Productions, 
326 Pukalani St., Pukalani, HI 96768. 

NEW YORK FILM BUFFS: film society promoting indie films 
seeks 16mm & 35mm features, shorts & animation for ongo- 
ing opinion-maker screenings during fall & winter seasons. 
Send submission on VHS tape w/ SASE to: NY Film Buffs. 
318 W. 15th St., New York, NY 10011; (212) 807-0126. 

OCULARIS seeks submissions from indie filmmakers for our 
continuing series. Works under 15 mins long will be consid- 
ered for Sunday night screenings where they precede that 
evening's feature film, together with a brief Q & A w/ audi- 
ence. Works longer than 15 mins will be considered for the 
regular group shows of indie filmmakers. We only show works 
on 16mm w/ an optical track. Please send all films, together 
w/ a completed entry form (download from website) to: Short 
Film Curator, Ocularis, Galapagos Art & Performance Space, 
70 N. 6th St., Brooklyn, NY 11211; tel/fax (718) 388-8713; 
ocularis@billburg.com; www.billburg.com/ocularis 

THE PARTNERSHIP FOR JEWISH LIFE introduces an ongo- 
ing series showcasing emerging Jewish filmmakers' work at 
MAKOR, a place for New Yorkers in their 20s and 30s. Now 
accepting shorts, features, docs and/or works-in-progress on 
any theme for screening consideration and network building. 
PJL's film program is sponsored by Steven Spielberg's 
Righteous Persons Foundation. For more info, contact Ken 
Sherman: (212) 792-6286; kensherman@ makor.org 



School 



Learn How 

Independent Filmmaking 

Really Works 

THE ART OF THE PITCH 

The Shooting Gallery's Jim Powers 

coaches you on pitching 

your project to the industry. 

CINEMATOGRAPHY 
FOR THE DIGITAL AGE 

A breakdown of digital video 

from shooting through post, 

with screenings on video and 

35mm. 

Spring Session Begins In March 

Call for complete class listing. 

212-965-9444 x240 

reelschool@filmmakers.org 

http://www.filmmakers.org/school.htm 



«* / ii e/ & a 




non-linear video editing 



Create, 






in the comfort 



of a private edit suite 



component interformat studio: 

betacam-sp,3/4",hi-8,s-vhs 

3d animation/graphics/cg 



Video for Art's Sake 

Independent Post Production 
in the East Village 



Meg Hanley, Editor 

212.254.1106 



1999 Call for Entries 




FIL7VA FESTIVAL 

lit! Annul fill/Video F e s t i v a 

Staller Center for the Arts/Stony Brook & 

Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center 

May 20th-July 30th, 1999 

Call or Write for Entry Forms (Due 4/1/99) 

Christopher Cooke, Director 

Long Island Film Festival 

c/o P.O. Box 13243 

Hauppauge, NY 11788 

1-800-762-4769 . (516) 853-4800 

From 10:00am-6pm, Mon-Fri 

or visit our website at www.lifilm.org 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 47 



ERICAN MONTAGE INC 




«;ivifia kw=p=rirj=fj r: 



Award Winning Clients And 
Productions at Reasonable Rates 



A V 



9 & 4 

Film & Video Production 

Post-Production Specialists 

Time Coded Duplication 

Hi-8, VHS, 3/4SP, Betacam SP 
Editing & Dubbing 

Mac Graphics & Digital Effects 



375 West B'way 3R, NY, NY 10012 

3 3 4-8283 



DTD 
Authoring dt Encoding 




DITUCATIOX 
POiT PRODUCTION 



Media 100 Editing 

DVD Authoring 
MPEG 2 Encoding 

DVD Burning 

Video Duplication 

Transfers & Conversions 

145 West 20th St. 

New York, NY 10011 

Fax: 212-242-4419 



Film Festival Duplication Special 



20 VHS Tapes 

w/sleeves & labels 

Independents 

Only 



NOTICES 



PERIPHERAL PRODUCE, presented by Rodeo Film Co., is 
Portland-based roving showcase & distr. co-op for exp & 
underground film/video. Curated shows exhibited bi-monthly. 
Formats: 16mm, VHS. $5 entry fee. Contact: Peripheral 
Produce, Rodeo FilmCo., Box 40835. Portland, OR 97240; 
mattmpproduce@msn.com 



QUEER PUBLIC ACCESS TV PRO- 
DUCERS: Author seeks public access 
show tapes by/for/about gay, lesbian, 
bi, drag and trans subjects, for inclu- 
sion in an academic press book on 
queer community programming. All 
program genres are welcome. Send 
VHS tapes to: Eric Freedman, 
Assistant Professor, Communication 
Dept., Florida Atlantic University, 777 
Glades Rd., Boca Raton, FL 33431; 
(561) 297-3850; efreedma@fau.edu; 
Please include information about your 
program's history and distribution. 

SUDDEN VIDEO call for entries. Ind. 
curators seek short works. Looking for 
experimental works that approximate 
emotional tone of events that inspired 
their production. Works should be 
under 10 mm. long & be available on 
videotape for exhibition/distribution. 
Send submissions on VHS w/ SASE to: 
Gort/Raad, 17 Edward Ave., 
Southampton, MA 01073. 

UNQUOTE TV: 1/2 hr nonprofit pro- 
gram dedicated to exposing innovative 
film & video artists, seeks ind. works 
in all genres. Seen on over 60 cable 
systems nationwide. Send submis- 
sions to: Unquote TV, c/o DUTV, 33rd & 
Chestnut Sts., Philadelphia, PA 19104; 
(215) 895-2927; fax 895-1054. 



DROP ONE, PURL ONE 



Now in its 7th year, the Knitting 
Factory's bi-weekly Video Lounge 
presents Searching for Go-Hyang 
from the Women Make Movies Video 
collection in celebration of Women's 
History Month. Dedicated to 
the video works of emerging jB^. 
international artists, the 
Video Lounge showcases 
experimental, digital, and 
animation works on all 
themes ranging from erot- 
ica to comedy. Recent I 
special programs include 
the monthly Independent Exposure 
Erotic and Animations series, co- 
curated with Blackchair Productions, 
7th Annual Short Attention Span Film 
and Video Festival, 6th Annual New 
York Digital Salon, and Peyotl's Aller 
Retour. Now accepting entries for a 
special April Fool's Day Gag & Joke 
show, deadline: March 13th. Video 
Lounge, PO Box 1220, Canal St. 
Station, New York, New York 10013; 
kf_vl@hotmail.com; www.video 
lounge.org 



DeCordova, DeCordova Museum, 51 Sandy Pond Rd., 
Lincoln, MA 01773-2600. 

WORLD OF INSANITY looking for videos & films to air on 
local cable access channel, particularly anything odd, 
bizarre, funny, cool. Any length. One hour weekly show w/ 
videos followed by info on the makers. Send VHS or SVHS to: 
World of Insanity, Box 954, Veneta, 
OR 97487; (541) 935-5538. 



WXXI PUBLIC TELEVISION'S 
"INDEPENDENT FILM SERIES" 

wants short films/videos, animation, 
art films and longer documentaries 
for possible screenings on weekly 
pnmetime series. Topics are your 
choice, but should 



for viewing by a general television 
audience. Submit entries on VHS. If 
chosen, a broadcast quality version 
will be required. For more info or 
entry forms, call: (716) 258-0244. 

Publications 



UPLOAD YOUR VISIONS: The Sync Internet Video Gallery 
seeks short noncommercial ind. films to showcase on web- 
site. Filmmakers must own rights to all content, incl. music. 
Send videos & written permission to display film to: Carla 
Cole, The Sync, 4431 Lehigh Rd., #301, College Park, MD 
20740; (301) 806-7812; www.thesync.com 

VIDEO/FILM SHORTS wanted for local television. Directors 
interviewed, tape returned with audience feedback. 
Accepting VHS/S-VHS, 15 mm. max. SASE to: Box 1042, 
Nantucket, MA 02554; (508) 325-7935. 

VIDEOSPACE BOSTON seeks creative videos for fall & spring 
programming. Any genre & length. Nonprofit/no payment. 
Send VHS, Hi-8, or 3/4" with description, name, phone, and 
SASE to: Videospace, General Submissions, 9 Myrtle St., 
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130. 

VIDEOSPACE AT DECORDOVA MEDIA ARTS ARCHIVE: 

DeCordova Museum & Sculpture Park seeks VHS copies of 
video art & documentation of performance, installation art & 
new genres from New England artists for inclusion in new 
media arts archive. Send for info & guidelines: Videospace at 



ART ON FILM DATABASE offers free 
listings. Have you produced films, 
videos, or CD-ROMs on art or archi- 
tecture? Send info for inclusion in 
database of over 25,000 prods on 
visual arts topics. Prods about 
artists of color & multicultural arts projects are welcomed. 
Send info to: Program for Art on Film, Inc., c/o Pratt SILS, 200 
Willoughby Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11205; (718) 399-4206; fax: 
399-4207; artfilm@sils.pratt.edu; www.artfilm.org 

CANYON CINEMA'S 25th Anniversary Catalog (including 
1993-5 supplements) with over 3,500 film and video titles is 
available for $20. Call or fax (415) 626-2255; canyon® 
sj.bigger.net 

FILMMAKER'S RESOURCE: A Watson-Guptill publication by 
Julie Mackaman. A veritable "supermarket of great opportu- 
nities; more than 150 of them, for a wide variety of filmmak- 
ers.. .from feature to doc to educational to animated films." 
Contact: Watson-Guptill, Amphoto, Whitney Library of 
Design, Billboard Books, 1515 Broadway, New York, NY 
10036. 

GUIDE TO TAX EXEMPTIONS FOR FILMS SHOT IN NY STATE 

is available for producers who want clear instructions on how 
to claim the numerous tax exemptions available in NY state 
for film, television & commercial production. Put together by 
the Empire State Development Corp. and the NY State Dept. 



48 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



of Taxation and Finance, the 51-page reference guide can be 
obtained by contacting NY State Governor's Office or the Tax 
Office. NY State Governor's Office for Motion Picture and 
Television Development, 633 3rd Ave., 33rd Floor, New York, 
NY 10017-6706; (212) 803-2330; fax; 803-2369; 
www.empire.state.ny.us/mptv.htm 

INDEPENDENT PRESS ASSOCIATION Save the Ideas! 
Without independent sources of ideas and discussion, 
democracy and dissent cannot thrive. The IPA works to nur- 
ture and encourage indie publications committed to justice 
for all. To find out more, write to IPA, Box 191785, San 
Francisco, CA 94119; or call (415) 896-2456; indy 
press@igc.org; www.indypress.org 

IFFCON '99 transcripts are now avail. Topics discussed by 
financiers & producers include: Myths & Realities of Domestic 
Financing & The New Digital Frontier. Send $45 to: IFFCON; 360 
Ritch St.; San Francisco, CA 94107; (415) 281-9777. 

MEDIA MATTERS, Media Alliance's newsletter, provides 
comprehensive listings of New York area events & opportuni- 
ties for media artists. For a free copy, call Media Alliance at 
(212) 560-2919 or visit their web site at www. 
mediaalliance.org. 

THE SQUEALER, quarterly journal produced by Squeaky 
Wheel, puts an upstate NY spin on media-related subjects. 
Once a year, The Squealer publishes "State of the State," a 
comprehensive resource issue w/ detailed info on upstate 
media arts organizations, access centers, schools & coali- 
tions. Subscriptions $15/year. Contact; Andrea Mancuso, 
Squeaky Wheel, 175 Elmwood Ave., Buffalo, NY 14201; 
http://freenet.buffalo.edu. -wheel/ 

Resources • Funds 

ARTS LINK Collaborative Projects allow US artists and arts 
organizations to undertake projects overseas with colleagues 
in Central and Eastern Europe with grants from $2,500- 
$10,000. Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents 
of the United States. Deadline; Applications must be post- 
marked by March 15. Contact; Arts Link, CEC International 
Partners, 12 West 31 St., New York, NY 10001-4415; arts 
link@cecip.org 

BAVC OPENS JOB RESOURCE CENTER: Funded by the San 
Francisco Mayor's Office of Community Development, the Job 
Resource Center provides San Francisco residents with free 
access to information and resources pertaining to video and 
new media industries. Internet access is available for online 
job searches, as well as industry publications, career devel- 
opment books and job/internship listings. Open Mon.-Fri. 12- 
6p.m. BAVC, 2727 Mariposa St., 2nd FL, San Francisco, CA 
94110; (415) 861-3282; www.bavc/org 

CALIFORNIA ARTS COUNCIL offers various grants & pro- 
grams for film & mediamakers. Contact: California Arts 
Council, 1300 I St., Ste. 930, Sacramento, CA 95814; (916) 
322-6555; (800) 201-6201; fax: (916) 322-6575; 
cac@cwo.com; www.cac.ca.gov 

CITIZEN CINEMA, INC., 501[c]3, nonprofit arts education 
org. dedicated to promoting the art of filmmaking, is planning 
to establish filmmaking workshops in high schools and is 



looking for donations of used 16mm cameras, sound, lighting 
& editing equipment in good working order. Donations of 
equipment are gratefully accepted & tax deductible. Contact: 
Dan Blanchfield, Executive Director, at (201) 444-9875. 

CREATIVE PROJECT GRANTS: Subsidized use of VHS, inter- 
format & 3/4" editing suite for ind. creative projects. Doc, 
political, propaganda, promotional & commercial projects are 
not eligible. Editor/instructor avail. Video work may be done 
in combination w/ S-8, Hi8, audio, performance, photogra- 
phy, artists, books, etc. Studio includes Amiga, special 
effects, A&B roll, transfers, dubbing, etc. Send SASE for 
guidelines to: The Media Loft, 727 6th Ave., New York, NY 
10010; (212) 924-4893. 

INDEPENDENT TELEVISION SERVICE considers proposals 
for new, innovative programs & limited series for public TV on 
an ongoing basis. No finished works. Contact: ITVS, 51 
Federal St., Suite 401, San Francisco, CA 94107; (415) 356- 
8383; www.itvs.org 

MATCHING GRANT FOR RESTORATION offered by VidiPax. 
VidiPax will match 20% of funding received from govt, foun- 
dation or corporate funding agency. Individual artists need 
non-profit fiscal sponsorship to apply. Video & audiotape 
restoration must be performed at VidiPax. Contact: Dara 
Meyers-Kingsley, (212) 563-1999, xl 11. 

NEW DAY FILMS: premier distribution cooperative for social 
issue media, seeks energetic independent film & videomak- 
ers w/ challenging social issue documentaries for distr. to 
nontheatncal markets. Now accepting applications for new 
membership. Contact: New Day Films 22D Hollywood Ave., 
Ho-Ho-Kus, NJ 07423; (201) 332-7172; www.newday.com 

NEXT WAVE FILMS, funded by Independent Film Channel, 
offers finishing funds and other vital support to emerging 
filmmakers. We are focused on English language feature 
films that will be released threatrically. Contact: Tara 
Veneruso, Next Wave Films, 2510 7th St., Ste. E, Santa 
Monica, CA 90405; (310) 392-1720; fax: 399-3455; 
launch@nextwavefilms.com; 

OPEN DOOR COMPLETION FUND: Natl Asian American 
Telecommunications Association (NAATA) offers completion 
funding for projects in final stages of postproduction, w/ 
awards averaging $40,000. Works should present fresh & 
provocative takes on contemporary Asian American & Asian 
issues, have strong potential for public TV & be of standard 
TV lengths (i.e., 1 hr.). Conact: NAATA Media Fund, 346 Ninth 
St., 2nd Floor, San Francisco. CA 94103; (415) 863-0814; 
fax: (415) 863-7428; mediafund@naatanet.org; www. 
naatanet.org 

OPPENHEIMER CAMERA: new filmmaker grant program 
offers access to professional 16mm camera system for first 
serious new productions in dramatic, doc, exp, or narrative 
form. Purely commercial projects not considered. Provides 
camera on year-round basis. No application deadline, but 
allow 10 week min. for processing. Contact: Dana Meaux, 
Oppenheimer Camera, 666 S. Plummer St., Seattle, WA 
98134; (206) 467-8666; fax: 467-9165; dana@ 
oppenheimercamera.com 

PACIFIC PIONEER FUND offered by Film Arts Foundation to 
documentary filmmakers living in California, Oregon & 
Washington. Limited to organizations certified as public char- 



MHM ■■■ 


r r .-Ti 

1 * J£mL n ■ 


cly c lie 
[P o s J 


We're a Full-Service Post- 
Production facility for the 
alternative filmmaker. We have 
an ADR/Foley Studio, AVIDs, 
AudioVisions, ProTools, and a 

high-speed, 8-plate, 
supercharged steenbeck. We 

provide creative editors, 
experienced technical support 
and expert post supervision at 

competitive rates. For more 

information, contact Jeanette 

King at (212) 679-2720. Or Fax at 

(212 679-2730. 

SPIN CYCLE POST, INC. 

■ 12 West 27th St., 6th Floor ■ 

New York, NY 10001 


m—m ■ hJ 





Learn 

Film 

Making 

in Vermont 



B.A. Degree program. 
Learn from successful independent 
filmmakers in beautiful Burlington, 
I ermont. Call for more information. 



J w!fi Burlington 
^S§ College 

l)c/it. MM. 95 North Ave. Burlington VT 05401 
1-800-862-9616 www. burkol.edu 



March 1 W THE INDEPENDENT 49 



Creative editorial 
services for film 
and television. 

A seasoned and capable editor 
with documentary and feature 
credits, as well as national 
TV commercials and award- 
winning corporate video. 

MEDIA 100 EDIT SUITE... 

ii i:. 4AAvn innnt.n 



Real-Time transitions), 
54GB storage, BetaSP, SHVS, 

DAT, CD, Scanner, After Effects, 
Photoshop, Illustrator... 

Midtown Manhattan location 



(800) 807-4142 

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS WELCOME 



Context Studios 

Film & Video Services 



LOW COST 




■ ■ I 1 ■■ VJMIM 

film-to-video 

transfer 

• double system 

• time coded transfers 

precise drop frame sync for computer editing 
and original picture matchback 

• mag track recording 

PLUS: 

• non-linear editing 

• 1 6 track digital recording studio 

• film and video screening 

• theater with tights, sound system, multiple 
camera video recording and live switching 

• 10,000 Sf Of Space for rehearsal, 
shooting & set construction 



Context StudiOS • 28 Avenue A 
NY, NY 10009 • (212) 505-2702 



MASTER OF ARTS IN 



Medi 



at The New School 



Open House: 

February 11 & March 24 

At 6:00pm 

To request a catalog or 
attend an open house 

ifcall: 212-229-5630 x230 






www.newschool.edu/mediastudies/inFo68 



New School University 

The New School 

66 West 12th Street New York NY iooii 



The New School oFFers you a unique 
opportunity to tailor your own 
Master oF Arts in Media Studies 
program in multimedia, Film, audio, 
photography and video. Learn on- 
site, online or compose your own 
Flexible learning program using the 
New School's unique combination oF 
media theory and production in our 
state-oF-the-art Facilities. 






ities which control selection of individual recipients & super- 
vise their projects. Grants range from $1,000-$8,000 with 
approx. $75,000 awarded annually. For proposal summary 
sheet, send SASE to: Film Arts Foundation, 346 Ninth St., 2nd 
fl.. San Francisco, CA 94103, or call: (415) 454-1133. 

PANAVISION'S NEW FILMMAKER PROGRAM provides 
16mm camera pkgs to short, nonprofit film projects of any 
genre, including student thesis films. Send SASE to: Kelly 
Simpson, New Filmmaker Program, Panavision, 6219 DeSoto 
Ave., Woodland Hills, CA 91367-2602. 

PEN WRITERS FUND & PEN FUND FOR WRITERS & EDI- 
TORS WITH AIDS. Emergency funds, in form of small grants 
given each year to over 200 professional literary writers, 
including screenwriters, facing financial crisis. PEN's emer- 
gency funds are not intended to subsidize writing projects or 
professional development. Contact: PEN American Center, 
568 Broadway, New York, NY 10012-3225; (212) 334-1660. 

SOROS DOCUMENTARY FUND supports mtl doc. films and 
videos on current & significant issues in human rights, free- 
dom of expression, social justice & civil liberties. Two project 
categories considered for funding: initial seed funds (grants 
up to $15,000), projects in production or postproduction 
(average grant is $25,000, but max. is $50,000). Highly com- 
petitive. For more info., contact: Soros Documentary Fund, 
Open Society Institute, 400 W. 59th St., New York, NY 10019; 
(212) 548-0600; www.soros.org/sdf 

SPECIAL ASSISTANCE GRANTS offered by the Illinois Arts 

Council. Matching funds of up to $1,500 to Illinois artists for 
specific projects. Examples of activities funded are registra- 
tion fees & travel for conferences, seminars, workshops; 
consultants fees for the resolution of a specific artistic prob- 
lem; exhibits, performances, publications, screenings; mate- 
rials, supplies or services. Funds awarded based on quality 
of work submitted & impact of proposed project on artist's 
professional development. Applications must be received at 
least 8 weeks prior to project starting date. Call for availabil- 
ity of funds. Illinois Arts Council, 100 W. Randolph, Suite 10- 
500, Chicago, IL 60601; (312) 814-6570 toll-free in IL (800) 
237-6994; ilarts@artswire.org 

UNIVERSITY FILM & VIDEO ASSOCIATION: student grants 
available for research & productions in following categories: 
narrative, documentary & expenmental/ammation/multi- 
media. For app. & info, contact; Prof. Julie Simon, UFVA 
Grants, U. of Baltimore, 1420 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 
21201. 



AND NOW A WORD ABOUT THE 
INDEPENDENTS CLASSIFIEDS: 

"The response to my classifed ad has 

been fantastic. When you need to 

reach the independent film 

community, look no further than 

The Independent." 

—MIKE H0LL0WAY 
OPTICAL SOUND, CHICAGO 

To make the classifieds work for you, call 
(212) 807-1400 x.229 or email: scott@aivf.org 



50 THE INDEPENDENT March 1990 



CONTACT: [scott@aivf.org]. DEADLINES: 1ST OF EACH 
MONTH, 2 MONTHS PRIOR TO COVER DATE (E.G. APRIL 
1 FOR JUNE ISSUE). CLASSIFIEDS OF UP TO 240 CHAR- 
ACTERS (INCL. SPACES & PUNCTUATION) COST 
$25/ISSUE FOR AIVF MEMBERS, $35 FOR NONMEM- 
BERS; 240-480 CHARACTERS COST $45/ISSUE FOR 
AIVF MEMBERS, $65 FOR NONMEMBERS. INCLUDE 
VALID MEMBER ID#. ADS EXCEEDING REQUESTED 
LENGTH WILL BE EDITED. ALL COPY SHOULD BE TYPED 
AND ACCOMPANIED BY A CHECK OR MONEY ORDER 
PAYABLE TO: FIVF, 304 HUDSON ST., 6TH FL, NY, NY 
10013. TO PAY BY CREDIT CARD, INCLUDE: CARD TYPE 
(VISA/MC); CARD #; NAME ON CARD; EXPIRATION 
DATE; BILLING ADDRESS & DAYTIME PHONE. ADS RUN- 
NING 5+ TIMES RECEIVE A $5 DISCOUNT PER ISSUE. 



Buy • Rent • Sell 

1999 MEDIAMAKER HANDBOOK: The essential resource for 

making independent film, video & new media. Completely up- 
to-date for 1999, the Handbook includes listings of film festi- 
vals, distributors, screenplay competitions, exhibition venues, 
media arts funders, film and video schools, broadcast venues 
& other resources. Contact: Bay Area Video Coalition, 2727 
Mariposa St., San Francisco, CA 94110; (415) 861-3282; fax: 
861-3282; bavc@bavc.org 

FOR RENT: Sony DCR-VX1000 3-chip digital camera. Also 
available: mike, light & tripod. Negotiable rates for both short- 
and long-term rentals. Please call (718) 284-2645. 

GUERILLAQUIP Light & Grip equipment rental. Mole- 
Richardson, Arri, Lowell; complete light & grip packages & light 
kits for the true low-budget indie filmmaker. Our prices will 
help you get it in the can! (212) 252-2485; gorillaquip@ 
smartweb.net 

SOHO AUDIO RENTALS: Time code DATs, RF diversity mics, 
playback systems, pkgs. Great rates, great equipment & great 
service. Discounts for AIVF members. Larry (212) 226-2429; 
lloewinger@earthlink.net 

VIDEO DECKS/EDIT SYSTEMS FOR RENT: I deliver! All types/ 
best prices: Beta-SP deck (Sony UVW-1800) $150/day, 
$450/week. D/Vision nonlinear offline $450/week. SVHS offline 
$350/week. Canon digital 3-chip camera $200/day. Call David 
(212) 362-1056. 

WANTED TO BUY: Good condition S-VHS or DV editing system 
w/TBC. Call (203) 226-8313 

Distribution 

16 YEARS AS AN INDUSTRY LEADER! Respected distributor 
of award-winning video on healthcare, mental health, disabili- 
ty & related issues, seeks new work. Fanlight Productions, 47 
Halifax St., Boston, MA 02130; (800) 937-4113; www.fan 
light.com 

A+ DISTRIBUTOR since 1985 invites producers to submit 
quality programs on VHS w/ SASE for distributor consideration. 
Mail to Chip Taylor Communications; 15 Spollett Dr., Derry, NH 
03038; www.chiptaylor.com 

AQUARIUS HEALTH CARE VIDEOS: Leading distributor of out- 
standing videos because of outstanding producers. Join our 
collection of titles on disabilities, mental health, aging, nursing. 



psychosocial issues, children & teen issues. For education- 
al/health markets. Leslie Kussmann, 5 Powderhouse Lane, 
Sherborn, MA 01770; (508) 651-2963; www.aquarius 
productions.com 

ATA TRADING CORP., actively & successfully distributing inde- 
pendent products for over 50 yrs, seeks new programming of 
all types for worldwide distribution into all markets. Contact: 
(212) 594-6460; fax: 594-6461. 

ATOMFILMS is a new, innovative, short-film distribution com- 
pany seeking high-quality short films in all genres (30 mm. or 
less) to distribute to broadcast and cable TV, home video, DVD, 
Internet, hospitality & other major markets. Films must have all 
clearances & rights for commercial distribution. Submissions 
on VHS (NTSC, PAL, SECAM): AtomFilms Acquisitions, 80 S. 
Washington, Ste 303, Seattle, WA 98104; information@atom- 
films.com; www.atomfilms.com 

FLICK0RAMA.COM is an Internet exhibition theater dedicated 
to independent cinema. Flickorama showcases underexposed 
work by indie filmmakers (animation, avant-garde, docs, fea- 
tures & shorts). The site provides a glimpse, via clips or pre- 
views on RealMedia Player, so that potential distributors, fes- 
tival coordinators, financiers, cable channels, agents & pro- 
ducers can see what exciting visions are out there. The site is 
updated every two weeks. Flickorama will contact filmmakers 
if their work has recieved notice from interested parties. (718) 
625-0926; www.flickorama.com 

LOOKING FOR AN EDUCATIONAL DISTRIBUTOR? Consider the 

University of California. We can put 80 years of successful 
marketing expertise to work for you. Kate Spohr: (510) 643- 
2788 or www-cmil.unex.berkeley.edu/media/ 

SEEKING EDUCATIONAL VIDEOS on guidance issues such as 
violence, drug prevention & parenting for exclusive distribution. 
Our marketing gives unequaled results. The Bureau for At-Risk 
Youth, Box 760, Plainview, NY 11803; (800) 99-YOUTH x. 210. 

Freelance 

35MM/16MM PROD. PKG w/ cmematographer. Complete stu- 
dio truck w/ DP's own Arri 35BL, 16SR, HMIs. dolly, jib crane, 
lighting, grip, Nagra . . . more. Ideal 1-source for the low-bud- 
get feature! Call Tom today for booking. (201) 807-0155. 

AATON & DAT-equipped team seeks projects of interest. Years 
of experience include indie films, docs, commercials & b'cast. 
We have talent, experience, style & dedication for filmmaker w/ 
vision. (888) 699-8881; cinedirect@hotmail.com 

AATON CAMERA PKG. Absolutely perfect for independent fea- 
tures. Top of the line XTR Prod w/ S16, time code video, the 
works! Exp DP w/ strong lighting & prod skills wants to collab- 
orate in telling your story. Andy (212) 501-7862; 
circa@interport.net 

ACCLAIMED & UNUSUAL instrumental band can provide 
music for your next project. Contact "Magonia" for demo: (781) 
932-4677; boygirl@mediaone.net 

ACCOUNTANT/BOOKKEEPER/CONTROLLER: Experience in 
both corporate & nonprofit sectors. Holds MBA in Marketing & 
Accounting. Freelance work sought. Sam Sagenkahn (212) 
481-3576. 

AWARD-WINNING EDITOR, w/ Avid and Beta SP facility. 



CLASSI 



Features, shorts, doc, music videos, educational, industrials, 
demos. Trilingual: Spanish, English, Catalan. (212) 627-9256. 

BETA SP videographer w/ new Sony Betacam SR mics & lights. 
Very portable, lightweight & I'm fast. Experience includes: docs, 
interviews, industrials, fashion shows & comedy clubs. Please 
call John Kelleran (212) 334-3851. 

BETA SP VIDEOGRAPHER, skilled in everything from exterior 
hand-held to Rembrandt interior lighting styles, seeking inter- 
esting projects to shoot. Has attractive Sony Betacam SR cool 
sets of lights & sensitive microphones. Willing to travel. Yitzhak 
Gol (718) 591-2760. 

BRENDAN C. FLYNT: Director of Photography w/ 15 feature 
credits & dozen shorts. Owns 35 Am, Super/Std.16 Aaton, 
HMIs, Tungsten, & dolly w/ tracks. Call for quotes & reel at 
tel/fax: (212) 226-8417; ela292@aol.com Credits: Tromeo 
and Juliet, The Offering, Fine Young Gentlemen, Brushfire-, 
www.dp-brendanflynt.com 

CAMERAPERSON: Visual storyteller loves to collaborate, 
explore diverse styles & formats. Brings passion & productivi- 
ty to your shoot. Award-winner w/ latest Super/Std.16 Aaton 
XTR Prod, package. Todd (718) 222-9277; wacass@ 
concentric.net 

CAMERAPERSON: Straight from Europe, bicontinental experi- 
ence in features and feature-length documentaries. Ambitious, 
unusual, awarded. Call Wolfgang at (718) 596-3907; 
lewo@compuserve.com 

CINEMATOGRAPHER w/ Aaton & lighting, looking forward to 
working w/ collaborative directors on: narratives, exp, docs, 
RS.A.s, music videos. Steven Gladstone (718) 625-0556 for 
new reel; VEENOTPH@aol.com 

CINEMATOGRAPHER w/ Aaton Super/Std.16 pkg w/ video tap 
& more. Credits in features, shorts & music videos of diverse 
styles w/ special interest in docs. Great rates for compelling 
visions. Kevin Skvorak (212) 229-8357. 

COMPOSER: Affordable original music in any style that 
enhances the mood/message of your project. Save money 
without compromising creativity. Full service digital recording 
studio, Yale MM. FREE demo CD/intial consultation/rough 
sketch. Call Joe Rubenstein; (212) 242-2691; joe56@ 
earthlink.net 

COMPOSER, 20 yrs. experience in film, theatre, dance. Well- 
known composer/performer & expert in World/Ethnic music 
styles. Call for CD incl. new symphony based on Hebraic 
theme. Bill Vanaver, Vanaver Caravan Prod. Inc., (914) 658- 
9748; vanaver@aol.com 

COMPOSER for film/video, new media projects. Innovative 
sounds that won't strain your pocketbook. For a free demo & 
brochure, contact Progressive Media Arts at: (415) 550-7172; 
pma@progmedia.com; www.progmedia.com 

COMPOSER: Experienced, versatile composer avail, for scor- 
ing, sound design. Can meet all postproduction requirements. 
Video & audio reels avail. Cam Millar (212) 781-7737; 
Ccmillar@aol.com 

COMPOSER: Perfect music for your project. Orchestral to tech- 
no — you name it! Credits incl. NFL, PBS, Sundance, Absolut. 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 51 



Dndie Since 1988 



W 



>N' 



, f 



SOUND DESIGN 



OMPOSITIN 



i in 



1 1 WEEHAWKEN STREET, NYC 



«* 



212.691.1 




Digital Media Arts Center 

audio & video 
post-production 

protools 4 / media 100 /after effects 

1 6 - track lock to betacam sp & 3/4 

voice over & adr/sound effects 

video capture & compression 

original music/sound design 

special rates for independents 

Harvestworks Digital Media Arts Center 

2 12.431.1130 x I 

596 Broadway, Suite 602, NYC 10012 

http://www.harvestworks.org 



WWW. GLC. COM 



Betacam SP 

DV & DVCAM 

3/4 SP Hi-8 SVHS 
Component Editing 

Transfers, Window Dubs 
45/hr 340/day 175/night 




1123 Broadway, Suite 814 
New York, New York 10010 

www2.infohouse.com/earthvideo 



212-228-4254 



Bach, of Music, Eastman School. Quentin Chiappetta (718) 
383-6607; qchiap@el.net 

COMPOSER FOR FILM/TV: Academy Award-winning. 
Broadcast: PBS, NBC, ABC, CBS. Highly experienced & dedi- 
cated. Music in all styles w/ an original touch. Complete digi- 
tal studio. Reasonable rates. Leonard Lionnet (212) 980-7689. 

DIGITAL VIDEO Videographer/D.P with Canon 3-CCD digital 
videocam; prefer documentaries; video-assist for films; docu- 
mentation for dance and performace; misc. projects. 
Reasonable. Alan Roth (718) 218-8065; 365892© 
newschool.edu 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY with Arn SR II w/ tap and 

Panavision filters, Sony Beta SP HMI's, Kino Flos, Jimmy Jib & 
grip truck. I make great pictures, work fast & have tons of expe- 
rience. Call for reel: (203) 254-7370; page: (917) 824-3334. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: 35mm, S16mm/16mm. 
Creative, experienced, award winning, w/ feature, ads, docs, 
music videos & industrial credits. Own Arri SR 1 S16/16mm pkg 
w/ Zeiss lens, tungstens, sound pkg. LKB Prod: (718) 802-9874. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY looking for interesting features, 
shorts, ind. projects, etc. Credits incl. features, commercials, 
industrials, short films, music videos. Aaton 16/S16 pkg avail. 
Abe (718) 263-0010. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY w/ complete Arri-Zeiss 16mm 
pkg. Lots of indie film experience. Features, shorts & music 
videos. Save money and get a great looking film. Willing to 
travel. Rates are flexible and I work quickly. Matthew: (914) 
439-5459 or (617) 244-6730. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: Award-winning, exp, looking 
for interesting projects. Credits incl. features, docs & commer- 
cials in the U.S., Europe & Israel. Own complete Aaton Super 
16 pkg & lights. Call Adam for reel. (212) 932-8255 or (917) 
794-8226. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY w/ awards, talent & experience. 
Credits include features, commercials, docs, shorts & music 
videos. Owner of Aaton Super/Std.16 pkg; 35mm pkgs also 
available. Call for reel. Bob (212) 741-2189. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: w/ Digital Canon XL1, digital 
postproduction facility, and a powerhouse Macintosh graph- 
ic/compositing workstation. Real film look quality without the 
high cost of shooting on film. Available for shorts, features, 
music videos, industrials, commercials. Strong lighting back- 
ground & accustomed to working with limited resources. 
Flexible rates & willing to travel. Call for reel. Seeing is believ- 
ing. Tom (203) 849-8953; innervisions@earthlink.net 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY w/ own 35mm sync sound 
Arnflex BLII avail. Beautiful reel, affordable rates. Crew on 
standby. Work incl. several features, shorts, music videos. Travel 
no problem. Dave (718) 230-1207; page: (917) 953-1117. 

DOCUCREW WEST: Award-winning writer, producer, director 
w/ new Betacam (D-30) pkg; Media 100 editing. Trilingual in 
English, Spanish & German. Let us help shape your project. 
Reasonable rates. Near San Diego. Mark (760) 630-7398. 

DOCUMENTARY TEAM wants new challenge. DP & Mixer with 
decades of experience seek filmmakers with mission. Film & 
video packages avail. (888) 699-8881; docuteam@hotmail.com 



52 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



OP w/ full postproductlon support. Experienced film/video DP 
w/ 16:9 digital & 16mm film cameras, lighting/sound gear & 
complete nonlinear editing services. Call (212) 334-4778 
Derek Wan, H.K.S.C. for reel & low "shoot & post" bundle rates. 

EDITOR w/ or w/out own Avid. Avid available for dryhire. Neg. 
rate for interesting projects. Experienced in editing docs, ads & 
music videos on Avid or flatbeds. Phone lsa : (212) 874-3289; 
fax: 874-3289; isalee@hotmail.com 

EDITOR WITH AVID, 14 years experience, including 4 features. 
Full featured Avid MC1000 w/ AVRs 3-77, 3D DVE, Ultimatte & 
Film matchback. Low price package deals for independent pro- 
jects. Contact Dan Lantz at (610) 337-3333. 

EDITOR W/ EQUIPMENT: Producer/director w/ 18 years expe- 
rience in advertising & industrial work available for projects. 
Just completed NEH historical doc for NYU. (212) 952-0848; 
Ruvn@aol.com 

ENTERTAINMENT ATTORNEY: frequent contributor to "Legal 
Brief" columns in The Independent & other magazines offers 
legal services on projects from development to distribution. 
Reasonable rates. Robert L. Seigel, Esq.: (212) 307-7533. 

ENTERTAINMENT ATTORNEY: Former AIVF exec. dir. and an 
ITVS founder offering legal & business services to indies at rea- 
sonable rates. Over 4 years experience as biz affairs exec, at 
NYC production/distribution companies. Contact Lawrence 
Sapadin; (718) 768-4142. 

EXPERIENCED CINEMATOGRAPHER with crew & equipment; 
16mm & 35mm. Short films & features. Vincent (212) 995-0573. 

FILM CONSULTANT: Award-winning writer/director (PBS, MTV, 
feature credits), acquisitions executive for Infinity Films, offers 
advice to filmmakers, critiques scripts & films. Reasonable 
rates. Nick Taylor (212) 414-5441 

INNOVATIVE EDITOR w/ Avid available for challenging projects. 
Experienced in fiction features, commercials, music video & 
documentary. Reel available. Rodney (718) 246-8235. 

JOHN BASKO: Documentary cameraman w/ extensive interna- 
tional Network experience. Civil wars in Beirut, El Salvador, 
Nicaragua, Tienanman Square student uprising. Equipment 
maintained by Sony. (212) 727-7270; fax: 727-7736. 

LOCATION SOUND: Over 20 yrs sound exp. w/ timecode Nagra 
& DAT, quality mics. Reduced rates for low-budget projects. 
Harvey & Fred Edwards, (518) 677-5720; beeper (800) 796- 
7363 (ext/pin 1021996); edfilms@worldnet.att.net 

ORIGINAL MUSIC composed, arranged, orchestrated for film, 
video & multimedia. Output to tape, DAT, Zip, or Jaz. Quick turn- 
around, very reasonable rates. Demo reel, references available. 
(212) 749-9340; www.musicnyc.com 

SCI-FI MOVIE, creature effect maker, ammatronic. DP w/ crew, 
own equipment. Plus shooting on Betacam. All jobs pay. Set 
designer, stunt coordinator, more. Send reel/resume to: BDS 
Co., Box 59, Dunellen, NJ 08812. 

SONY VX1000 DIGITAL CAMERA w/ cameraman. Kenko wide 
angle lens, Sennheiser ME 66 shotgun mic, boom, XLR adapter, 
pro tripod, 3 Bescor 4 hour batteries. $150/day. (212) 677-6652. 

STEADICAM: Dolly smooth moves w/ the flexibility of a hand- 
held camera. Call Sergei Franklin (212) 228-4254. 



nn mm 



THE 



Luna delt'rers. 




* 




free delivery and set-up in your home or office 

long term // short term rentals 
the most cost-effective way to cut your indie film 




PICTURES 



212 255 2564 



mania 




A not-for-profit media arts 
organization providing access 
to broadcast quality video 
post-production services for artists 
& independent producers at 
drastically discounted rates. 
— Standby also publishes FELIX, 
A Journal of Media Arts and 
Communication. -■ 



• Interformat Online Edit $ 85/hr 

• Digital Audio Post $ 85/hr 

• Digi Beta to D2 Edit $120/hr 

• Duplication & Conversions Inquire 

Contact us for other services, 
prices and access information . 



POB 184, New York, NY 10012 
Email: maria@standby.org 
Phone:(212)219-0951 
Fax: (212) 219-0563 TT 
www.standby.org 



NON LINEAR 
EDITING 




V 



E O 



REAL TIME TRANSITIONS 



BROADCAST ONLINE 
3:1 TO 200:1 OFFLINE 



MULTI-LAYERING 



BETACAM SP EDITING 
HI 8 & 3/4SP — 3/4 AB 

ANIMATION & GRAPHICS 

DUPLICATION 

TRANSFERS from HI8 to BETA 



Phone (212) 219-9240 
Fox (212) 966-5618 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 53 



Need legal representation? 

Call Ken Feldman or Abe Michael Shainberg at the 
Feldman Law Firm for 

INDEPENDENT FILM PACKAGING TO FINANCIERS AND DISTRIBUTORS 

AGREEMENTS .CONTRACT REVIEW, LITIGATION , COLLECTION, OR DEFENSE IF SUED. 

•3 s Free Consultation © Fair Rates "*» 



FELDMAN LAW FIRM , 12 East 41 st Street, #1302, 212-532-8585, fax: 212-532-8598 
www. feldman-law.com or e-mail us at abems@concentric.net 




Avid MC9DQO, MC1000 

Film Composer, Xpress Plus 

off/on-line AVR77 & 3D DVE 

Digital Betacam, Digital I/O 

DVCPRO, 3/4 SP, HIS S VHS V I D 

transfers & duplication Crush available] 

Macintosh graphics & After Effects compositing 
tape to disk [Jazz, Zip, Syquest, CD-R] 
web site design & maintenance 

Betacam SP & DV field packages 

cffef"«\gspec\odra.\esfcf xrMjs-t-S *nd independents since ' trt 

212.523.S204 

D ¥ B V I D E / lU BRQHDWHV / PENTHOUSE / N Y C 10003 




AVID EDIT SUITES 

OFFLINE /ON LINE/3DFX 



Grafix Suite/After Effects 
Audio Design/Mixing/Protools 
V.O. Booth /Read To Picture 



VOICE 



1D4 WEST 29TH ST NY 1DOD1 



212. 244. 0744 



212.244.0690 



CLASSIFIEDS 



VISUAL MUSIC/PURE AUDIO DALI, Exp., eclectic composer 
avail for collaboration. Techno-orchestral, hip-hop collages/ 
ambient sound design. Billy Atwell at foreHEAD productions 
(212) 576-TUNE. Jeunet/Caro, Lynch, S. Shepard types pref. 
Animation! 

Opportunities • Gigs 

ACTORS & ACTRESS NEEDED for drama workshop program. 
Our class is taped & broadcast weekly on Comcast Cablevision 
of NJ ; 1.2 million subscribers. Call James (973) 674-8680. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CINEMA, Dept. of Cinema at San 
Francisco State Univ. seeks an ass't professor in film produc- 
tion. M.F.A. in film or equivalent degree, significant body of film 
work & teaching experience required. Applicants from all eth- 
nic and cultural backgrounds encouraged to apply. Applications 
reviewed between Feb. 1 and March 5, 1999. Send letter of 
interest, cv & names of 3 references to: Search Committee, 
Dept. of Cinema, SF State Univ., 1600 Holloway Ave., San 
Francisco, CA 94132. 

TEMPLE UNIV. Dept. of Film & Media Arts seeks active inde- 
pendent mediamaker for full-time, tenure track Ass't Professor 
position starting Aug. '99. Teach in two areas: film &/or video 
production at undergrad & graduate level, advance production 
specialties, producing, culture/media studies, media literacy, 
along w/ one large intra lecture course in production &/or 
media studies. Sensitivity to issues of diversity, in addition to 
ability to teach & work across theory & practice. MFA, Ph.D. or 
equiv. professional experience required along w/ impressive 
portfolio of creative work in film, video, or digital media, or 
combo of scholarly & creative work. Position will remain open 
until filled. Submit cover letter, vita & names & telephone num- 
bers of three references to: Chair, Search Committee, Dept. of 
Film & Media Arts, Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA 19122. 
AA/EO Employer. Women & minorities encouraged to apply. 

WELL-ESTABLISHED freelance camera group in NYC seeking 
professional shooters as well as soundmen w/ Betacam video 
experience to work with our wide array of news & news maga- 
zine clients. If qualified, contact COA immediately at (212) 
505-1911. 



Preproduction • Development 

DIRECTOR/PRODUCER looking for original film script or play to 
be made into short film for festival submission. Humorous, 
alternative viewpoints preferred. No fee. (203) 226-8313. 

LOOKING FOR SCRIPTS w/ female protagonist, 20s-30s. Send 
1 page synopsis and cover letter to Bluepoint Entertainment, 325 
East 64th St., #209, New York, NY, 10021; bluepoint@mind- 
spring.com. You will be contacted if there is interest. 

SU-CITY PICTURES: The Screenplay Doctor, The Movie 
Mechanic: We provide screenplay/treatment/synopsis/films- 
in-progress insight/analysis. Studio credentials include: 
Miramax & Warner Bros. Competitive rates. Brochure: (212) 
219-9224; www.su-city-pictures.com 



54 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



POSTPRODUCTION 

16MM & 35MM OPTICAL SOUNDTRACKS: If you want "High 
Quality" optical sound for your film, you need a "High Quality" 
optical sound negative. Mike Holloway, Optical Sound Chicago, 
Inc., 676 N. LaSalle St., #404, Chicago, IL 60610; (312) 943- 
1771, or eves: (847) 541-8488. 

16MM CUTTING ROOMS: 8-plate & 6-plate fully equipped 
rooms, sound-transfer facilities, 24-hr access. Downtown, near 
all subways & Canal St. Reasonable rates. (212) 925-1500. 

16MM SOUND MIX only $100/hr. Interlocked 16mm picture & 
tracks mixed to 16 or 35mm fullcoat. 16mm/35mm post ser- 
vices: picture & sound editorial, ADR, interlock screening, 
16mm mag xfers (.06/ft) 16mm edgecoding (.015/ft) Call Tom 
(201)807-0155. 

AVID 8000: Why rent an Avid Media Composer 400 when you 
can get an 8000 for less 7 Avid Media Composer 8000; real- 
time fx; 4 channel pro-tools; 24 hr access. Seriously unbeat- 
able prices!' (212) 375-0785; (718) 638-0028. 

AVID 8000 & 1000 SUITES: Pleasant, friendly, comfortable 
Upper West Side location. On-line & off-line, AVR 77; reason- 
able & affordable rates. Tech support provided. (212) 595- 
5002 or (718) 885-0955 

BRODSKY & TREADWAY Film-to-tape masters. Reversal only. 
Regular 8mm, Super 8, or archival 16mm to 1" or Betacam SR 
We love early B&W & Kodachrome Scene-by-scene only. 
Correct frame rates. For appt. call (978) 948-7985. 

FOR RENT: OFF-LINE AVID In a spacious air conditioned suite, 
located at 180 Vanck Avid 1000; AVR 3-77; 69 GB Storage; 
Beta Deck; Media Composer 6.5.3.; Power Mac 9600. Available 
March 1999. Please call Moxie Films, Inc. (212) 620-7727. 

MEDIA 100 FOR RENT IN BOSTON: Excellent rates! Top of the 
line XR system with 300 KB resolution; 32 gigs hard drive 
space; Beta SP deck; Private office with 24 hour access and 
beautiful garden. Call Liz Canner (617) 266-2418. 

MEDIA 100 EDITING Broadcast quality, newest software. Huge 
storage & RAM. Betacam, 3/4", all DV formats, S-VHS, Hi8. 
Great location, friendly environment & low rates, tech support, 
talented editors & FX artists available (212) 431-9299. 

MEDIA 100 EDITOR: Accomplished visual storyteller will edit 
on your equipment or in my fully equipped project studio. 
Credits: several narrative projects, major ad agencies (Young & 
Rubicam, Warwick Baker & O'Neill, Seiden Group), accounts 
(Johnson & Johnson, Arm & Hammer, PSE&G), and corp. pro- 
jects (The Equitable, USA Today, CUNY, SUNY). Studio w/ Media 
100XS (300KB), 54GB storage, Beta, Scanner, DAT, PhotoShop, 
Illustrator, AfterEffects. John Slater (800) 807-4142. 

MEDIA 100 PCI, broadcast quality, real time suite: Beta-SR 
Hi8, 3/4", VHS, AfterEffects, Elastic Reality, PhotoShop, 
Illustrator, Hi Res Scanner. Short- & long-term TV or feature 
projects in comfortable Tribeca setting. (212) 941-7720. 

THE MEDIA LOFT, High-end look at low-end prices! VHS & 3/4 
suites, Hi-8 video, Super-8 film, audio & photo services. Call 
Bill Creston: (212) 924-4893. 

OUTPOST Digital Productions: 3 rooms, all MedialOO V-4.5 
broadcast quality. Beta, DV, Hi8, VHS; AfterEffects, Deck 2. Lots 
of drive space; great editors or self-operate. Low rates, free 
coffee. (718) 599-2385. Williamsburg; outpostvideo.com 




m 



All In One Productions 

Your Low Budget Production Paradise 

Newest Software V 5.0— supports 16:9 DTV 

mm m* -4 /y/1 On-line Quality 

/MGu/cJ 7C/U As low as $200/Day 



Non-Linear Digital Editing Systems FC/n /fC/V/*Editors Available 

G3s, 91 GIGs, 300 MB of RAM, Support ALL Formats 

After Effects, Commotion, Boris Effects, Photoshop, Illustrator, ProTools... 

Multi-lingual Voice Over, Titling & Sub-Titling 

Chinese, Spanish. Russian, Japanese, Korean, Hindi, Arabic, Italian Tagaktg, English, and counting — — 

DV Cloning, Timecode Burn-in, Multi-Format Transfers & Dubs 
www.AllinOne-USA.com (212) 334 47'7'8 401 Broadway, Suite 2012, NYC 




29 



TH STREET VIDEO 



A full service video editing and production company. 
Formed by independent producers who saw the need 
for a hi-quality, fair priced facility. Fifteen years of 
experience in Broadcast, Documentary and Corporate 
video. We know how to do it. 

PRODUCTION: 29th Street Video is a full 



service video production house. One camera or multi- 
camera, we do it the best, and we do it for less. 

POSTPRODUCTION: full service 



BETACAM SP ON-LINE EDITING S95/HR. Included: Sony 
DSF500 3D digital effects, Tascam 10 ch. mix, a very 
comfortable room. More flash, less cash. 

DUPLICATION: Talk is cheap. Send 
something to dub and you won't regret it. We use high 
grade tape and the best SONY machines. 

212.594.7530 



Production and Post 
Non Linear Offline & Online 

Beta to Beta From All Sources 
A Professional Facility 

Intelligent Solutions 

(And, oh, in case you need to space out, 

we've got a cool view of the city, too) 

New York City (Union Square) 

212.529.2875 www.pixbiz.com 



TKME 

BUSINESS 

PRODUCTIONS INC 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 55 



www.aivf.org 



EVEKTS 



By Michelle Coe 
& Vallery Moore 

Most events listed take place at the AIVF Office: 
304 Hudson St. (between Spring & Vandam) 6th 
fl., in New York City. Subways: 1, 9 (Houston St.); 
C, E (Spring St.); A (Canal St.) We encourage 
people to RSVP for events (larger events require 
50% fee deposit to save seats) as well as to check 
in tor updates and potential time changes. 

The following is a list of events whose details, 
upon deadline, were being confirmed. Please visit 
our website: www.aivf.org or our Event Hotline: 
(212) 807-1400 ext. 301 for the latest info. 



IViarch Events 

AIVF AT THE 
NEW YORK UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL: 

DO-IT-YOURSELF DISTRIBUTION 

When: Saturday, March 13, 1-3 p.m. 

Where: Anthology Film Archives (32 2nd Ave. at 

2nd St. in NYC), Maya Deren Theatre. 

Cost: Free! 

To register/hear more details: Participants will be 

announced on the AIVF hotline: (212) 807-1400 

x. 301. No RSVP necessary. 




Get the low-down on self-distribution from the 
hottest filmmakers on the cutting-edge. Panelists 
will include film and videomakers from all for- 
mats and genres who have gone the distribution 
route on their own and thrived to tell about it. 
Come hear the war stories and absorb the advice. 
For a complete festival schedule, contact: 
NYUFF Hotline (212) 252-EVIL. 




MEET & GREET: 

SOLID ENTERTAINMENT 

WITH RICHARD PROPPER 

Wlien: Thursday, March 18, 6:30-8:30 p.m. 
Where: AIVF office. 

Cost: Free to members; $10/general public. 
To register/hear more details: (212) 807-1400 x 
301. Tickets also at the door. 

Solid Entertainment is an international distribu- 
tion company specializing in documentary televi- 
sion programming. The company was established 
in 1994 by Richard Propper 
and since then has sold pro- 
gramming in 86 broadcast 
territories. Broadcasters 
include: Animal Planet; BBC; 
the Discovery Channel; 

C m . ll + ;HB0 lt h e SOLID 

Learning Channel; NHK; tN i tKiAiiNMtw i 
Odyssee; Planete; 

Premiere; PBS; STAR Channel; SBS6; and 
VTM. Secrets of the Deep, Cyberwarriors, Americas 
Schools, and The Band are among Solid's repre- 
sented work. President Richard Propper will dis- 
cuss his company and the projects it seek, as well 
as the climate for the documentary sales. 

NEW EVENTS SERIES! 
UP CLOSE: CONVERSATIONS WITH FILMMAKERS 

T7us series presents personal insight and advice from 
fdmmakers. Featured guests will discuss their process- 
es and styles, and reflect on their careers in the 
industry. Clips may be shown of their latest work, 
with full screenings when possible. 

GOING DIGITAL PT 2 

A panel with Bennett Miller, Todd Verow, and 
Lance Weiler. Moderated by Esther Robinson. 
When: Tuesday, March 30, 7-9 p.m. 
Where: AIVF office. 

Cost: $5 AIVF members/$10 gen. public. 
To register/hear more details: (212) 807-1400 
x. 301. Tickets also at the door. 

Join in on this conversation among accomplished 
filmmakers who've made digital video their medi- 
um of choice. Directors and key creative person- 
nel will present clips and reflect on their creative 
and technical processes and experiences in the 
independent realm. Filmmakers include Bennett 
Miller (The Cruise), Todd Verow (Shucking the 



Curve — showing in April at New Filmmakers) , 
and Lance Weiler (The Last Broadcast). 

EXHIBITION SERIES: 

NEW FILMMAKERS 

Co-sponsors: AIVF, Angelika Entertainment 
Corp., New York Underground Film Festival 
When: Every Wednesday: Shorts at 7 p.m.; fea- 
tures at 8 p.m. 

Where: Anthology Film Archives (32 2nd Ave. 
at 2nd St. in NYC) 
Cost: $5. Tickets at box office. 
For a complete schedule: Visit the AIVF Resource 
Library, pick up an Anthology monthly schedule, 
or call Anthology at (212) 505-5110. 

New Filmmakers gives independent film- and 
videomakers the chance to exhibit their work to 
the public and provides New York audiences with 
the opportunity to see outstanding new films. A 
year-round festival, the program is administered 
by filmmakers for filmmakers. Every Wednesday, 
get in on the most promising of emerging talent 
with screenings of shorts beginning at 7 p.m. and 
features at 8 p.m. 
See Resource Profile on page 58 for further details'. 

April Events 

ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING 

Come to AIVF's Annual Membership Meeting 
and join with fellow independent media makers 
to discuss the state of the independent communi- 
ty. Meet AIVF staff and the AIVF/ FIVF Board 
of Directors and learn about our upcomming pro- 
grams. This meeting will be held on Friday, April 
9th and is open to all. Location TBA. 

NEW SERIES: 

TECHSPEAK 

AIVF and Film/Video Arts announce TechSpeak, 
a series exposing the infinite resources in the 
New York City area that independent filmmakers 
can tap into. Tours will be offered of indie-friend- 
ly postproduction & equipment facilities and 
enhanced by roundtable discussions with film- 
and videomaking pros. Demos will be offered to 
give you the lowdown on the newest systems and 
gadgets. See the events page of our website for 
current details. 



56 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 




THE ASSOCIATION OF INDEPENDENT 
VIDEO AND FILM 



About AIVF and FIVF 

The Association of Independent 
Video and Filmmakers (AIVF) is a 
national membership organization of 
over S,000 diverse, committed, 
opinionated and fiercely independent 
video and filmmakers. ATVF is 
affiliated with the Foundation for 
Independent Video and Film (FIVF), 
an educational 501(c)(3) nonprofit 
dedicated to the development and 
increased public appreciation of 
independent film and video. 

To succeed as an independent today, 
you need a wealth of resources, strong 
connections, and the best information 
available. Whether through the pages 
of our magazine, The Independent Film 
8r Video Monthly, or through the 
organization raising its collective 
voice to advocate for important 
issues, ATVF preserves your 
independence while letting you know 
you're not alone. 

Here's what AIVF 
membership offers: 

^Independent 

"We Love This Magazine!!" 
-UTNE Reader- 

Vlembership provides you with a 
jear's subscription to The Independent 
[hought-provoking features, news, 
ind regular columns on business, 
:echnical and legal matters. Plus 
estival listings, distributor profiles, 
under profiles, funding deadlines. 



exhibition venues, and announcements 
of member activities and new 
programs and services. Special issues 
highlight regional activity and focus 
on subjects including experimental 
media new technologies, and media 
education. 

INSURANCE 

Members are eligible to purchase 
discounted personal and production 
insurance plans through AIVF 
suppliers. Health insurance options 
are available, as well as E&O and 
production plans tailored to the 
needs of low-budget mediamakers. 

TRADE DISCOUNTS 

Businesses across the country offer 
AIVF members discounts on equipment 
and auto rentals, film processing, 
transfers, editing and other production 
necessities. Plus long-distance and 
overnight courier services are 
available at special rates for AIVF 
members from national companies. 
Members also receive discounts on 
hotels and car rentals. 

WORKSHOPS, PANELS, 
AND SEMINARS 

Special events covering the whole 
spectrum of current issues and 
concerns affecting the field, ranging 
from business and aesthetic to 
technical and political topics. 

INFORMATION 

Stay connected through www.aivf.org. 
Members are entitled to exclusive 
on-line services such as searchable 



AKERS 

databases and web-specific content 
published by The Independent We 
also distribute informational resources 
on financing, funding, distribution, 
and production; members receive 
discounts on selected titles. With 
over 600 volumes, our office library 
houses information on everything 
from distributors to sample contracts 
to budgets. 

COMMUNITY 

Monthly member get-togethers 
called AIVF Salons occur in cities 
across the country. These member- 
run, member organized salons 
provide a unique opportunity for 
members and non-members alike to 
network, exhibit, and advocate for 
independent media in their local 
area. To find the salon nearest you 
check the back pages of The 
Independent the AIVF website, or 
call the office for the one nearest 
you. If you can't find one in your 
area then start one! 

CONFERENCE ROOM 

Members have access to our low- 
cost facility to hold meetings, 
auditions, or small private video 
presentations of work for friends, 
distributors, funders, and producers. 

ADVOCACY 

AIVF continues its efforts to advocate 
for the field, holding forums around 
the country and publishing articles 
to keep independent mediamakers 
abreast of the latest issues 
concerning our community. 



MEMBERSHIP CATEGORIES 

INDIVIDUAL/STUDENT MEMBERSHIP 

Includes: one year's subscription to The Independent • access to group insurance plans and discounts • 
on-line or over-the-phone information services • discounted admission to seminars and events • book 
discounts • advocacy action alerts • eligibility to vote and run for board of directors • members' 
only web services. 

SUPPORTING MEMBERSHIP 

All of the above benefits extended to two members of the same household except for the year's 
subscription to The Independent, which is shared by both 

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION/BUSINESS fr INDUSTRY MEMBERSHIP 

All the above benefits (except access to insurance plans) with 3 one-year subscriptions to The 
Independent • representative may vote and run for board of directors • special mention in 
The Independent 



LIBRARY/UNIVERSITY SUBSCRIPTION 

Year's subscription to The Independent for multiple readers 



JOIN AJVF TODAY! 



□ $100/1 yr. 

□ $150/1 yr. 



MEMBERSHIP RATES 

Student □ $35/1 yr. 

(enclose copy of current student ID) 

Individual □ $55/1 yr. 

Supporting □ $95/1 yr. 

Non-profit Organization 

Business 8r Industry 

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION 

□ $75 domestic □ $90 foreign 

Name 

Organization 

Address 

City 



□ $60/2 yrs. 

□ $100/2 yrs. 

□ $l£0/2 yrs. 



MAILING RATES 

Magazines are mailed second-class in the US 

□ Canada - add $15 

□ Mexico - add $20 

□ All other countries - add $45 

□ First-class U.S. mailing - add $30 



Your additional contribution will help support programs of 
the Foundation for Independent Video and Film, a public 
educational non-profit tax exempt under section S01(cX3). 



State 



ZIP 



Weekday teL 
Email 



Country 
fax 



\ 



Membership cost 

Mailing costs (if applicable) 

Additional tax-deductible contribution to FIVT* 

(please make separate check payable to FIVF) 

Total amount enclosed (check or money order) 

Or please bill my LJ Visa LJ Mastercard 

Acct# 

Exp. date: / / 

Signature I 



Mail to AIVF, 304 Hudson St, 6th Floor, NY, NY 10013; or charge by phone (212) 507-1400 x236, 
by fax (212) 463-5519, or via our website www.aivf.org 



Member Benefits 

CIGNA Health Plan 

Geographic Area Expanded! 

AIVF members who are residents of New Jersey 
and Connecticut may now enroll in the CIGNA 
Health Plans. For more info, contact: TEIGIT, 
845 Third Ave., New York, NY 10022; (212) 
758-5675; fax: 8884916. 

NEW TRADE DISCOUNTS 

FILM EMPORIUM 



date on the flyer to help keep our boards cur- 
rent.) Send information to the attention of 
Michelle Coe/Resume Bank c/o AIVF, 304 
Hudson St., 6th fl., New York, NY 1001 3. 

NOT RECEIVING YOUR 
INDEPENDENT? 

If you have any problems receiving The 
Independent or questions regarding your AIVF 
membership, please call LaTrice Dixon or Marya 
Wethers at x. 236. 



TRULY MODERN 



17 E. 45th St., Ste. 308, 
New York, NY 10017; 
(212) 681-6922; (800) 
371-2555; fax: 681- 
6920; mail@filrn.empo- 
rium.com; www.filmem- 
porium.com; Contact: 
Csilla Criner. Kodak & 
llford 1 6/35mm motion 
picture film: 1 0% off; 
video & audiotape in all 
professional brands & 
formats: 1 0% off; pro- 
duction insurance: com- 
plnnentary consultations. 

NETWORK 
THROUGH AIVF 



We get an average of 60 
walk-ins per week of 
filmmakers looking to 
crew up or get involved 
in projects. Our resume 
bank and bulletin 
boards are tilled with 
listings of talented cast 
and crew looking for 
projects and collabora- 
tors. We are currently 
updating our resources, 
so send us your resumes 

or business cards! Likewise, if you are looking to 
crew up your project, mail or fax us your posting. 
(Please include a deadline or announcement 



AIVF Reel • 

Holiday 

On December 7th, we held another of our leg- 
endary Christmas parties at AIVF. Over 300 
filmmakers, friends, and supporters of AIVF 
were in attendance to mix V mingle, weigh 
up the year's events, and hear the speeches 
of outgoing executive director Ruby Lerner 
and new ED Elizabeth Peters, who were 
introduced with usual applomb by Rob Moss., 
chair of the AIVF board. Catering by Hudson 
Caterers surpassed all other years, while the 
generous donations of Jones Soda, Brooklyn 
Brewery, and par- 
ticularly our sup- r^lH. 
porting donors M - ^ 
HBO and Forest 
Creatures 
Entertainment 
made the event 
memorable one 
Don't miss Reel 
Holiday '99! 



(top) J 

chair R„~. 

says so long, but 

not goodbye, to 

AlVF's fearless 

leader Ruby 

Lerner, who left 

AIVF in January to 

head up a new 



(below) The AIVF 

Christmas party 

also served to 

welcome incoming 

executive director 

Elizabeth Peters 







Find information, advocacy updates, articles, 

EA.Q.S & news on AIVF S website, along 

with bulletin boards, AIVF member salons, 

and databases. Check it out: 

WWW.AIVF.ORG 



FILM BYTES 

AIVF copresents FILM BYTES, a webcast series 
about independent media production (on 
every Monday at 8 p.m. at www.pseudo. com). 
Produced by Kinotek 6k Pseudo Network. 
Check out our website for further details 
[www.aivf.org]. 




• AATON XTRprod SUPER 16/16mm 

• ARRI SR2 16mm 

• SONY DVW-700 DIGITAL BETACAM 
WITH FILM-STYLE ACCESSORIES 

• SONY BVW-D600 BETACAM SP 

• STEADICAM PRO 

• 1 & 3-TON GRIP & LIGHTING / HMI'S 

• FIELD AUDIO FOR FILM & VIDEO 

• INDIE FRIENDLY LOW WEEKLY RATES 



MODERN MOVIE 

MACHINE J 



QUALITY PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT RENTALS 

281-561-7200 

888-569-7200 

mmm@insync.net 

www.modernmovie.com 

HOUSTON. TEXAS 



ip©s4 j®slh 


AVID EDITING 


AVR77 & a brain 


$1K / day 


Joshua Schwarz 


Editor 


Tribeca Film Center 


212 965-4632 


www.postjosh.com 



March 1 999 THE INDEPENDENT 57 




FILM t, VfOEO 



Sound Stage Rentals: 

34 x 28 x 14 

200 Amps 

Hard Cyc / Blue Screen 

$500 / day 

On Line Editing: 

DVCam, BetaSP, 3/4", S-VHS 

ABC Roll 

DVE: Pinnacle Alladin 

w/lots of Effects 

Video Toaster 4. 1 

$85 / hour with Editor 

Production Packages: 
SONY DVCAM: 

DSR-130 $380 /day* 

DSR-300 $280 / day* 

* Including Cameraperson 

Audio Services: 

ADR, voice-over recording 

$55 / hr. 

In-house Sound Design & Scoring 

also available. 

Tel: 212-679-9779 
Fax: 212-532-0444 



INFO RESOURCES 



NEW FILMMAKERS 




Everything 
included. 

Avid Media 

Composer Off-line 

at rates the artist 

can afford. 



kitchen 



225 Lafayette, suite 1113, Soho 
Tel: (516) 810-7238 • Fax (516) 421-6923 




Barney Oldfield, executive producer; David 
Maquiling, program director; c/o Anthology 
Film Archives, 32 Second Ave., New York, 
NY 10003; (212) 410-9404; fax: 410-3712 
(office). For schedule info: (212) 505-5110 
(Anthology) 

What is New Filmmakers? 

New Filmmakers is New York's year-round fes- 
tival. It gives filmmakers the opportunity to 
show their work directly to New York audi- 
ences. 

Your driving philosophy: 
That every filmmaker has something to say . . . 
although not everyone is going to pay $5 to 
hear it. 

How does New Filmmakers support itself? 
All the costs of New Filmmakers are paid hy my 
company, Angelika Entertainment. 

Who is behind New Filmmakers? 

David Maquiling is program director and works 
with our filmmakers board to select the films. I 
am executive director and work with the advi- 
sory Foard. (We wear suits and worry about 
business things.) In addition, we have a volun- 
teer promotional staff of three. 

And the specific services you offer? 

We try to get films and filmmakers recognized 
by audiences, by industry, and by other film- 
makers. We promote every screening heavily, 
with listings in Anthology and New 
Filmmakers schedules (both reaching over 
10,000 people), press releases, and email 
announcements. We have a strong industry fol- 



lowing who often come in 
person or ask for video 
copies. 

Where do your screen- 
ings occur? 

All New Filmmakers 
screenings are at Anthol- 
ogy Film Archives in New 
York City. 

Where do your submis- 
sions come from? 

We screen about 150 films 
and videos each year. Our 
submissions come from all 
over America and beyond, 
including Romania, Serbia, 
Bosnia, Germany, and 
Mexico. Most come from New York and Los 
Angeles, but we are seeing some interesting 
work coming from the Midwest and the South. 
The diversity makes for good programming. 

What kind of films do you present? 

We will screen just about anything. We look 
particularly for women filmmakers, gay and les- 
bian filmmakers, minority filmmakers, and total 
sociopaths with cameras. We try to stay away 
from normal festival fare, not because it is bad, 
but because it is a little tired and worn around 
the edges. 

How can filmmakers submit their work? 

We have no forms and charge no fees. Just send 
a VHS tape with your contact information and 
any accompanying material (press kits, syn- 
opses, bios, etc.) to David Maquiling (see 
above). You can also leave it at the Anthology 
box office. 

What are your long-term goals? 
Get longer runs at Anthology and other local 
theaters for some of our stronger films. We 
would also like to put our films on the road and 
screen some of our programs in other cities. 

Any famous last words? 

At the beginning, before David and the film- 
makers board, I programmed two of the worst 
films I had ever seen, one by mistake and the 
other under duress, and now they are all any- 
one wants to talk about. Festival programmers 
should remember, I think it was Sam Goldwyn's 
saying, "Nobody knows nothing." 

Michelle Coe 



58 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



IIW A. OUT OF PRODUCTION 



by Gesha-Marie 
Bryant 

Believe, the latest media instruction pro- 
ject at Northwest High School in Omaha, is 
based on a script written by TV producer and 
high school film instructor Blake Tippens. 




harsh reality of taking charge of his own destiny 
and the ease of fantasy life. With his predilec- 
tion for fantasy in matters of career and 
romance, Lang dreams of meeting Mastroianni 
and becoming a brilliant, celebrated screen- 
writer. Figure Eight Films, Box 1532, Ann Arbor, 
MI, 481064535; (734) 741-1114; www.fig- 
ureeightfilms.com 

If you find the Catholic Church's position on 
sexuality contradictory, Forbidden Wedding 
makes one of the strongest cases ever. Director 
Flavia Fontes (Chico Mendes: Voice of the 
Amazon and Living with Chimpanzees: Portrait of 
a Farnily) was inspired to make this documen- 
tary after an international uproar around a for- 



Inspired to "create a simple story 
that would appeal to and interest 
the students I work with everyday," 
this 16mm feature follows the 
Scream genre. A group of teens lock 
themselves in the local high school 
for a weekend to shoot the perfect 
horror film only to discover a men- 
acing presence in their midst, while a deeply 
religious member of the crew questions her 
belief system and faith. Other than the writing, 
the students enrolled in the Film Production 
course completed the film from start to finish as 
both cast and crew members, 75 percent of 
whom have and will enroll in broadcasting/pro- 
duction programs in college. Northwest Video 
Productions, 8204 Crown Point Avenue, Omaha, 
NE 68134; btippens(q:'ops.org 

Since Marcello Mastroianni's 1996 death 
from pancreatic cancer, the actor has been hon- 
ored with a slew of documentaries, retrospec- 
tives, and homages, including the recent Ciao 
Marcello, by novice producer Claudette 
Jocelyn Stern and writer/director Michael 
Hogan of Ann Arbor-based Figure Eight Films. 
Inspired by 8 1/2, Ciao Marcello is a 35mm fea- 
ture about a mid-twenties cineaste and 
Italophile, Otto Lang, who is torn between the 




bidden marriage. Because he is paralyzed below 
the waist, Hedir Antonio de Brito was denied 
the right to marry his fiancee, Elzimar de 
Lourdes Serafim, under Ecclesiastic Law 1084 
of the Roman Catholic Church, which forbids 
marriage without sexual union of partners. As a 
devout Catholic, de Brito protested this law 
and found church-sanctioned marriage 
through the dissident Brazilian Catholic 
Church, founded by priests fed up with the 
archaic inequities of the Vatican high courts. 
Now in postproduction, Forbidden Wedding 
explores the social issues at hand for Brazilian 
and Catholic communities through on-location 
interviews. Means of Production, 209 E. 81st St., 
New York, NY 10028; (212) 794-1982. 

When Two Won't Do, a Canadian television 
doc, funded in part by the Canada Council and 
SODEC, explores alternatives to monogamy 
and the traditional nuclear family using the 
road trip genre. With a variety of perspectives 



on the alternatives, which include group fami- 
lies, open relationships, swinging, polyamory, 
and the latest sexual therapies, filmmakers 
Maureen Marovitch and David Finch traveled 
to conventions and visited various experts 
nationwide. Interviews with a biologist, anti- 
monogamy sci-fi visionaries, divorce lawyers, 
alternative Utopian communities, relationship 
traditionalists, and even a jaded wedding gown 
merchant explore this lifestyle explosion to the 
hilt. With more footage to be shot on Beta and 
DVD and then blown-up to 35 mm, Marovitch 
and Finch plan to add the finishes touches with 
their personal involvement and discoveries of 
alternative relationships. Picture This 
Productions Inc., 154 Hillcrest St, Ville St. Pierre, 

Quebec, H8R 1]4; 

(514) 484-3777. 

Unsatisfied with 
less-than-generous 
distribution deals, 
self-proclaimed 
street producers 
and actors Jorge 
Ameer and John 
Greenlaw have 
marked their indie 
birth with efforts 
to self-distribute 
California Myth to 
theaters in Los 
Angeles and New 



York. The film 
is a cheeky 
'90s L.A. 

romantic com- 
edy of mid-life 
crises, new- 
age nude acting classes, unbridled libido, and 
pre-natal psychics. It has paved the way for 
their next feature, Strippers, yet another LA 
story of corporate greed and deceit. A J. 
Productions, 1135 N. La Brea Ave, Ste. 2197, 
Hollywood, CA 90028; (323) 876-0975. 

"In & Out of Production" invites AIVF members to 
send information about their works-in-progress or 
recently completed films or videos. Please include a 
synopsis, running time, format, and contact infor- 
mation. If available, send labelled photos, prefer- 
ably b&w glossies. Mail to: The Independent, 304 
Hudson, 6th fl. New York, NY 10013, attm In & Out. 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 59 




ffMiH 



Media 100 Suites 

(with or without editor) 

beta sp - 3/4" - Hi8 - VHS - SVHS 

2d/3d Graphics Design 

photoshop, illustrator, 
after effects, electricimage 

Voice-over Booth 
Internet and CD-ROM 

integration of your video projects 
into web pages and cd-rom. 



Medialuna 
Productions 

636 broadway, suite 214 

tel. 212.228.1133 

fax 212.228.1101 

www.medialuna.com 



Salons provide an opportunity for members to discuss 
work, meet other independents, share war stories, 
and connect with the AIVF community across the 
country. Note: Since our copy deadline is two months 
before the meetings listed below, be sure to call the 
local organizers to confirm that there have been no 
last-minute changes. 

Albany, NY: 

When: 1st Wednesday of each month, 6:30 p.m. 
Where: Borders Books 6k Music, Wolf Rd. 
Contact: Mike Camoin, (518) 518-5269; videos4c(5' 
cris.com 



THE PALM BEACH STORY 



Atlanta, GA: 

When: Second Tues. 
of the month, 6:30. 
Where: Redlight Cafe, 
Amsterdam Outlets 
off Monroe Dr. 
Contact: Mark 

Wynns, IMAGE 
(404) 352-4225 xl2. 

Austin, TX: 

When: Last Monday 

of the month, 8 p.m. 

Where: Electric 

Lounge, 302 Bowie 

Street. 

Contact: Ben Davis, 

(512) 708-1962. 

Birmingham, AL: 

When/Where: Call 
for date & location. 
Contact: Michele Foreman, 
(205) 298-0685. 

Boston, MA: 

When/Where: Call for date 6k 

location. 

Contact: Susan Walsh, 

528-7279. 



Chuck Elderd (I), Palm 
Beach County Film 
Commissioner, congrat- 
ulates Palm Beach AIVF 
salon founder/director 
Dominic Giannetti on a 
job well done during the 
first AIVF/Palm Beach 
networking party, held 
at The Lounge (a bar 
conveniently owned by 
AIVF member Rodney 
Mayo). 




(508) 



Brooklyn, NY: 

When: 4th Tuesday of each 

month; call for time. 

Where: Ozzie's Coffeehouse, 7th Ave. & Lincoln PI. 

Contact: Glenn Francis Frontera, (718) 646-7533 

Chicago, IL: 

When/Where: Call for date 6k location. 

Contact: Oscar Cervera, (773) 751-8000 x. 2564- 

Cleveland, OH: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: Annetta Marion, (216) 781-1755 

Dallas, TX: 

When: 3rd Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. 

Where: Call for locations. 

Contact: Bart Weiss, (214) 999-8999. 

Denver/Boulder, CO: 

Monthly activist screenings: 
When: Second Thursday of the month, 7 p.m. 
Where: Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center, 
Other events: Call for date and location. 
Contact: Diane Markrow, (303) 449-7125 or 
Jon Stout (303) 442-8445. 



Houston, TX: 

When: Last Tuesday of each month, 7 p.m. 

Where: Call for locations. 

Contact: Houston Film Commission Hotline, (713) 

227-1407 

Kansas City, MO: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: John Sjlobom (816) 333-7574 

Lincoln, NE: 

When: Second Wednesday of each month, 5:30 p.m. 

Where: Call for location 

Contact: Lori Vidlak, (402) 476-5422 or dot@inet- 

nebr.com 

New Brunswick, NJ: 

When: Last Wednesday of each month, call for time. 

Where: Cappiccino's Gourmet Cafe, Colonial Village 

Rte. 27 6k Parsonage Rd., Edison, NJ. 

Contact: Allen Chou (908) 756-9845 or www.pas- 

sionriver.com 

New Haven, CT: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 

Contact: Jim Gherer, ACES Media Arts Center, 

(203) 782-3675 

Palm Beach, FL: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: Dominic Giannetti, (561) 326-2 

Portland, OR: 

When/Where: call for date 6k 

location. 

Contact: Beth Harrington, 
(360) 256-6254 

San Diego, CA: 

When/Where: Call for 
date 6k location. 
Contact: Paul Espinosa, 
espinosata electriciti.com 
(619) 284-9811 

Seattle, WA: 

When/Where: Call for 
dates and locations. 
Contact: Joel Bachar, 
(206) 282-3592 

Tucson, AZ: 

When/Where: The first Monday of each month from 
6-8 p.m. at Club Congress, 31 1 E. Congress, in down- 
town Tucson. 

Contact: Beverly Seckinger, (520) 621-1239, Robert 
Ashle at robert(5'access. tucson.org or visit 
http://access.tucson.org/aivf/ 

Washington, DC: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: DC Salon hotline (202) 554-3263 x. 4 

Westchester, NY 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 

Contact: Bob Curtis, (914) 741-2538; reclll@aol. 

com or Jonathan Kaplan (914) 948-3447; jkap3@ 

juno.com 

Youngstown, OH: 

When/Where: Call for dates and times. 
Contact: Art Byrd, The Flick Clique 
com/flickclique 




/.cboss. 



For updates or changes to these listings, contact Marya 
Wethers: (212) 807-1400 x. 236. 



60 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 



IHEinBER BENEFITS 



Discounts are available to current AIVF members with card. 



CAR RENTAL DISCOUNTS 

Alamo: (800) 354-2322/Assn #254018, rate code BY 
Avis: (800) 331-1212/Discount #B636135 
Budget: (800) 772-3773/Assn #T514143 
Hertz: (800) 654-2210/CDP #283761 
National: (800) CAR-RENT/ Recap #5600368 

HOTEL DISCOUNTS (NYC) 

Carlton Arms (212)679-0680 

160 E. 25th St., New York, NY 10010 

Rates from $52-$76 with an additional 10% off for stays of 7 

days or more. 

Gramercy Park Hotel 

2 Lexington Ave New York, NY 10010 

Contact: Tom O'Brien, Sales Manager (212)475-4320 

$95 dbl/$125 twin on a space-available basis. You must call the 

Sales Manager to get the discounted rate. 

OVERNIGHT MAILING SERVICES 

Airborne Express (800) 642-4292 

Save up to 40% on overnight air express services. Member rate 

is $9.75 for an 8 oz. overnight letter express. Further discounts 

for volumes over 10 packages a month. Discount Code: 

1340130100 

ON-LINE SERVICES 

Echo Communications Group, Inc. 

179 Franklin Street, 4th Fl. New York, NY 10013 
Contact: Josh Chu (212) 292-0900; fax: (212) 292-0909; 
accounts@echonyc.com or jchu@echonyc.com 
http://www.echonyc.com 

25% discount on all Echo conference and SLIP/PPP accounts. 
Up to 25% off on commercial and non-profit web hosting pack- 
ages. 

The Sync- online network 

4431 Lehigh Rd #301 College Park, MD 20746 

Contact: Carla Cole (301) 806-7812; fax: (301) 474-5192; 

info@thesync.com 

5% off services. 

LEGAL CONSULTING 

Cinema Film Consulting 

333 W. 52nd Street New York, NY 10008 
Contact: Robert Seigel (212) 307-7533 

Cowan, Gold, DeBaets, Abrahams & Sheppard 

40 W. 57th Street New York, NY 10019 
Contact: Timothy DeBaets (212) 974-7474 

Law Office of Miriam Stern 

303 E. 83rd Street New York, NY 10028 

Contact: Miriam Stern (212) 794-1289; fax: (212)794-2340 

Stephen Mark Goldstein 

186 Riverside Dr. New York, NY 10024 
Contact: Stephen Goldstein (212) 878-4078 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

Creative and Career Development 

19 W. 34th Street, Penthouse Ste. New York, NY 10001 
Contact: Michelle Frank, CSW (212) 957-9376 



Licensed psychotherapist with film and TV experience assists 
indie filmmakers with creative and career development. 10% 
discount on individual sessions. 

FINANCIAL SERVICES 

Bell & Company, LLP 

15 E. 26th Street, Ste. 1605 New York, NY 10010-1599 
Contact: Martin M. Bell, CPA (212) 683-6111 phone/ 
(212) 683-2911 fax 
Free consultation on tax issues. 

Guardian Life Insurance 

Contact: Deborah Baum or Lisa Glass (212)261-1859 
Offering term, whole, universal, and variable life insurance; 
Disability for individuals and corporations; Retirement planning. 

Working Capital Management Account (WCMA) 
with Merril Lynch 

Contact: Sally Ann Weger (800) 999-6371 or (212) 415-7967 for 
more information. 

MEMBERSHIP MAILING LIST 

Contact: Marya Wethers at AIVF (212) 807-1400 x222 for dis- 
counted rates and other information. 

CONFERENCE/SCREENING ROOM 

Contact: Michelle Coe at AIVF (212) 807-1400 x235 
Seats 25 comfortably; 1/2" and 3/4" decks and 32" monitor cur- 
rently available. $25 per hour during office hours-evenings and 
weekends by arrangement. 

PRODUCTION INSURANCE 

Alliance Brokerage Corp. 

990 Westbury Rd Westbury, NY 11590 
Contact: Jay Levy (516) 333-7300; fax: (516) 333-5698 
Exclusive AIVF insurance program for owned equipment-can 
include rentals. World-wide all risk, replacement cost basis. 
Annual rate $55.00 per $1,000.00 of insured value. 

C&S International Insurance Brokers, Inc. 

20 Vesey Street, Ste. 500 New York, NY 10007 

Contact: Jennifer Del Percio (212) 406-7588 

Offers special discounted rates on commercial General Liability 

Insurance. 

Marvin S. Kaplan Insurance Agency, Inc. 

68 Fargo Street, Boston, MA 02210 

Contact: Marvin Kaplan (617)345-0666; fax: (617)261-0666 

A one of a kind program for film/video production insurance. 

Offers coverage of equipment owned or rented. Policy covers all 

states. 

HEALTH INSURANCE 

The following are happy to consult with AIVF members about 

health insurance. 

Jeff Bader (Agent) (718)291-5433 

Meyer Braiterman (Agent) (718) 965-3505 

Teigit (Administrator) (800) 886-7504 or (212) 758-5656 

DENTAL INSURANCE 

Community Dental Program, Inc. (888) 950-2259 
Teigit/Cigna (800) 886-7504 or (212) 758-5656 



AIVF 
J 



ASSOCIATION 

OF INDEPENDENT 
VIDEO AND 
FILMMAKERS 



MEMBERSHIP 
DIRECTOR 



I AIVF seeks a creative, 

organized, and 
enthusiastic individual 
to lead our busy 
membership department. 

The AIVF Membership Director works 
alongside 2 PT Membership Associates 
and FT Information Services and Program 
Director, among staff of 1 2. Responsibilities 
include maintenance of membership data 
and materials, development of member 
benefits and incentives, outreach to 
current and new constituencies. Requires 
strong written and oral communication, 
computer, and management skills; 
background in media arts. Prior nonprofit 
experience desirable. 
20 hrs/wk, starting salary %13/hr; 
possibility of full time w/ benefits. 

Please fax cover letter and resume by 
March 5 to: (212) 463-8519, or mail to 
AIVF, 304 Hudson St. 6th FL, New York, NY 
WOT 3. All applicants will be contacted. 

AIVF is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 



WHEN IT COMES TO 

ENTERTAINMENT & 

MEDIA INSURANCE 



WE ARE 
THE EXPERTS! 




DeWITT STERN 
GROUP, INC. 

NEW YORK 

420 LEXINGTON AVENUE 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 10170-0199 

TEL: (212) 867-3550 • FAX: (212) 983-6483 

JOLYON F. STERN, President 



CAROL A. BRESSI-CILONA, SR. Vice Pres. 



AFFILIATES IN: LONDON • PARIS • MUNICH 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 61 



KITCHEN 
CINEMA 




MEDIA nonlinear on-line 



editing suite 



UIJI 

at affordable 

rates 

NTSC & PAL Beta SP 
63 2i2 MicroNet Data Dock 
Jazz Drive - Mackie 1402 Mixer 

After Effects 

Editors available 



149 5 th AVE ■ NYC 
212 253 9472 




SCREENPLAY 



June 15th, 1999 

ROSARITO BEACH, 
BAJA CALIFORNIA 



The filming location ol Ihe movie epic, "II TANK" 




1ST PRIZE 


$2,000 


vius 


2ND PRIZE $1,000^ 


3RD PRIZE 


$500 


pflL<: 



FOR INFORMATION & APPLICATION 
Send S AS E to our U.S. Border address 

BISC 

P.O.Box 439030 

San Ysidro, CA 92143 

(619) 615-9977 



The Foundation for Independent Video and Film (FIVF), the educational affiliate 
of the Association for Independent Video and Filmmakers (AIVF), supports a variety 

of programs and services for the independent 
media community, including publication of 



Itvi 



- --' ^ * ^ 



The Independent and operation of the Festival Bureau, seminars and workshops, and an 
information clearing house. None of this work would be possible without the generous 
support of the AIVF membership and the following organizations: 

Academy Foundation Albert A. List Foundation, Inc. 

City of New York Department of Cultural Affairs John D. and Catherine T MacArthur Foundation 
The Mary Duke Biddle Foundation National Endowment for the Arts 

Home Box Office New York State Council on the Arts 

Heathcote Art Foundation The Rockefeller Foundation 

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation The Andy Warhol Foundation for the 

Jerome Foundation Visual ^ Inc - ^ m 



NYSCA «,.,,,„,, 

We also wish to thank the following organizational members: 

Business/Industry Members: CA: White Night Productions Inc.; CO: BET Movies/Starz!3; 
Intrepid Film & Video Inc.; FL: Thunder Head Productions; Respectable Street Inc.; GA: 
Legacy Pictures Inc.; MA: Blackside Inc.; MD: Koch TV Productions; MI: Jes & Woodcraft 
Video Prod. Inc.; MO: Wild Pictures, LLC; NJ: Galarza & Associates, Inc.; NM: Antares 
Research; NV: United Pictures; NY: Asset Pictures; Bee Harris Productions; The Bureau 
for At-Risk Youth; C &. S International Insurance Brokers; Cando Entertainment; Engel 
Production; Ericson Media Inc; G Productions; H & M Productions; Media Principia; Merci 
Entertainment, Inc; New Rican Filmmaker; NTV Studio Productions; One Such Films; Surf 
and Turf Films Inc.; Tribune Pictures; Virtual Media; Wonder Entertainment; PA: DUTV- 
Cable 54; RL Treasure Chest Television; TX: Aries Productions; Texas World Television; 
VA: Henninger Media Services; Spain: Sogecable. 

Nonprofit Members: AZ: University of Arizona; Women's Studies/Northern Arizona 
University; CA: Filmmakers Alliance; IFP/West; ITVS; Jewish Film Festival; Media 
Resource Center; NAMAC; USC School of Cinema TV; University of California; CO: 
Center for the Arts; CT: Film Fest New Haven; FL: Cultural Development Group; GA: 
Image Film Video Center; HI: Aha Punana Leo; University of Hawaii; IL: Community 
Television Network; The Art Institute of Chicago; Video Data Bank; Women In The 
Director's Chair; KY: Appalshop; Media Working Group; MA: Harvard Medical School; 
Long Bow Group Inc; Mass. College of Art; Northampton Film Festival; MD: Laurel Cable 
Network; MI: Ann Arbor Community Access TV; Ann Arbor Film Festival; Public Benefit 
Corp; WTVS Channel 56; MN: Bush Artist Fellowships; IFP/North; Intermedia Arts; 
Walker Arts Center; MO: Webster University; NC: Institute For Public Media Arts; NE: 
Ross Film Theater; NY: AARP New York State; Ascap; Brooklyn Film Institute; Center For 
New American Media; Cinema Arts Centre; Communications Society; Copiague Memorial 
Library; Cornell Cinema; Educational Video Center; Films for Educators; Ford Foundation; 
Guggenheim Museum Soho; John Jay High School; Learning Matters; Magnetic Arts, Inc.; 
Manhattan Neighborhood Network; National Video Resources; New York Women In Film 
and Television; Open Society Institute; Opposable Thumb Prod., Inc; Paul Robeson 
Fund/Funding Exchange; Rochester Film Office; Ross-Gafney; Squeaky Wheel; 
SUNY/Buffalo Dept. Media Studies; Syracuse University; Third World Newsreel; Upstate 
Films, Ltd.; WKSG Public Television & Radio; WNET/13; Women Make Movies; OH: 
Athens Center For Film & Video; Cincinnati Community Video; Cleveland Filmmakers; 
Flick Clique; Ohio Independent Film Festival; Ohio University-Film; OR: Communications 
Arts, MHCC; Northwest Film Center; PA: Carnegie Museum of Art; New Liberty 
Productions; Council On The Arts; Philadelphia FilnWideo Assoc; Scribe Video Center; 
Univ. of the Arts; RL Flickers Arts Collaborative; SO South Carolina Arts Commission; 
TN: Nashville Independent Film Fest; TX: Austin Cinemaker Coop; Austin Film Society; 
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Southwest Alternate Media Project; Texas Film 
Commmission; U. of Texas Dept. Radio -TV- Film; Worldfest Houston; WL Madison Film 
Forum; Mexico: Centra De Capacitacion Cinematografica; Australia: Clememger Harvie; 
Canada: Video Pool; York University;Reach Foundation Norway: Hogskulen I 
Volda/Biblioteket; Singapore: Ngee Ann Polytechnic Library. 



62 THE INDEPENDENT March 1999 




The Millennium Campaign Fund is a 
3-year initiative to develop a $150,000 

cash re- 
serve fund 
for the Foundation for Independent 
Video and Film by the year 2000. Since 
its inauguration in March 1997, we have 
raised more than $90,000. 

Our heartfelt thanks to all those who 
have so generously donated to the 
Millennium Campaign Fund! 

Corporate/Government/ 
Foundation Contributors 

BET/Encore; District Cablevision; Home 
Box Office; Jewish Communal Fund; New 
York State Council on the Arts; Tower 
Records/Video/Books; Washington DC 
Film Society. 

Honorary Committee Members 

(gifts of $500 or more) 

AIVF DC Salon; Ralph Arlyck; Peter 
Buck/C-Hundred Film Corp.; C&S 
International Insurance Brokers; Hugo 
Cassirer/Felix Films; Martha Coolidge, 
Linda & Bob Curtis; Rick Linklater/ 
Detour Film Foundation; Loni Ding; 
Jacqueline Donnet; Karen Freedman & 
Roger Weisberg; David Haas; Henry 
Hampton; Nik Ives; Bill Jersey; Leonard 
Merrill Kurz; Richard Kylberg; Tom 
LeGoff; Helaine & Sidney Lerner; Ruby 
Lerner; Juan Mandelbaum; John Bard 
Manulis; Diane Markrow; Sheila Nevins; 
David & Sandy Picker; Sarah E. Petit/ 
R.E.M./Athens LLC; Barbara Roberts; 
James Schamus; Robert L. Seigel; Liza 
Vann Smith; Miranda Smith; Michael 
Stipe; Ann Tennenbaum; Walterry 
Insurance Co.; Marc N. Weiss & Nancy 
Meyer; Robert E. Wise; Susan Wittenberg. 

We also wish to thank the individuals and 
organizations who have recently made or 
renewed generous donations of $100 or 
more as MCF Friends: 

Anonymous; Tessa Blake & Jason Lyon/ 
Asset Pictures Inc.; Steven Bognar; Virginia 
Loring Brooks; David H. Brown; Karen 
Cooper; Hal Hartly; Matthew & Katie 
Heineman; Ted Hope; Graham C. Leggat; 
Brad Lichtenstein; Jodi Magee; Donna 
McKay; Rob Moss; Michel Negroponte; 
Robin Reidy Oppenheim; Eloise Payne; 
Robert Richter; Lynne Sachs; Robin 
Schanzebach; Vivian Sobchack; Somford 
Entertainment; Jon A. Stout; Eugene B. 
Squires; Nick Taylor; Ed Williams; Pamela 
Yates. 




Northeast Negative Matchers, inc. 



Your Avid Film Composer Matchback Specialists 



Negative cutting & Conforming 

y 35mm 
> 16mm 
y Super 16mm 



"g&&& r 



413-736-2177 S413-734-1211 • 800-370-CUTS 



25 Riverview Terrace 
Springfield, MA 01 108-1603 



www.nenm.com 
e-mail: nenm@nenm.com 



NEW ITVS FUNDING INITIATIVE 



^LlaCS^ 




LOCAL INDEPENDENTS 
COLLABORATING 
with STATIONS 

Funded productions have included: 

O Sing Faster: 

The Stagehands' Ring Cycle 

O Tobacco Blues 

O Escape from Affluenza: 
Living Better on Less 

O Holding On; 

A Love Story pom the Street 

O Hopi Quilts 

O Shaker Heights: 

The Struggle for Integration 
For application guidelines: 

ITVS, 51 Federal Street, Suite 401, San Francisco, CA 94107 
(415) 356-8383, ext. 444 
Email: itvs@itvs.org 



O Production funds for independent 
producer & public television 
station partnerships 

© Station cash and in-kind 
contributions matched 1:1 

O Funding amounts will range from | 
$10,000-$65,000 

O All genres — singles, series and 
interstitiats eligible 

O Application deadline: April 30, 1999 



Pro Tools • Sound Editing 
• Surround Sound • ADR • 
Automated Mix to Picture • 
Foley • SFX • Sound Design 
I • Custom Music 



- Media 100 XR • HDR Real 
I Time FX • Adobe After 
Effects • Photoshop • D3 
Digital • Betacam SP • 
Off-Line • On-Line • Ani- 
mation • Full On-Location 
Services 




601 Gates Road • Vestal, NY 13850 
SERVING INDEPENDENTS SINCE 1971 

1-800-464-9754 



March 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 63 









Subscribe & Save 25% 



RealScreen brings the whole picture into focus! 

Subscribe today and receive the only publication dedicated to providing you with 
everything you need to know about the factual programming industry. 




Nobody covers the factual programming industry like RealScreen. A bold 
claim perhaps, but one we are proving to our readers with every monthly 
issue of RealScreen. We go that extra mile, exploring how developments in 
the factual programming industry impact you and your business. 

The Definitive Source 

> Each issue is packed with the latest news and analysis on production, 

programming, distribution, broadcasting, financing and much more. 

> Regular previews on industry-related markets and festivals. Find out the 
inside scoop on the key events! 

> Special editorial features on topics such as: 

> Stock Footage Archive - Profiles of the rarest and most unique stock 

footage libraries 

> Natural History Guide - A special edition that focuses on the trends, 

issues and prominent people in the Natural History genre. 



RealScreen is the must have, must read magazine for key players in the factual programming 
and documentary industries. Just listen to what these readers say: 

C C Finally there is a magazine like RealScreen. It's a great resource. 

Vivian Schiller, Senior Vice President & General Manager, CNN Productions. Atlanta, U.S. 

Succinct articles and some great nuggets of gossip and fact for the documentary 
market - RealScreen is a good read from cover to cover. 

Sarah Allan, Head of Programming. History Channel, U.K. 



It's a FACT! Nobody covers the factual programming industry better than RealScreen. 



About the business of docs, infomags and lifestyle programming 

ReaLSCReeN 



Fax today! 1.416.408.0870 

Subscribe & save 25% 

on a one year subscription! 

□ YES! Send me one year * 1 ^ issues ) °* RealScreen & 
I'll save 25% off the regular subscription price. 

□ US. S44 (reg. S59) □ CON S59 (red. $79) □ OutsiHe U.S. S Canada U.S. S74 (req. S99) 



Method of Payment 



Q Cheque enclosed (Payable to Brunico Communications Inc) 



□ Vis 



□ MC □ AMEX □ Please brll me 



Check us out at 
www.realscreen.com 



Telephone: 1.416.408.2300 and ask for the Summit offer 

Mail to: RealScreen. 366 Adelaide St, w, Suite 500, Toronto. ON M5V 1R9 Canada 



**** 



ATTENTION 



icickic 



riLH SL VIDEC PRODUCERS 




ERRORS & OMISSIONS 
INSURANCE 



ONE TIME PREMIUM 



ANNUAL RENEWAL NOT NECESSARY 



$$$ 



**> 



r 



<p& 



~y 



$$$ 



11 ra 



INSURANCE BROKERS 






% ,3 



P.O. BOX 128, CLINTON, MD 20735 
WWW.WALTERRY.COM 

1-800-638-8791 



1 



I 



ASSOCIATION OF I 



E P E N D E N T 



If 

VIDEO 

T 



AND FILMMAKERS 



Ofl 



never had formal training in film, so when i decided 

to make one, I joined AiVF. They have resources 
^aot writing bud^etin^ directing and distribution, 

not to mention a ^est community of fellow studen 
For $" a year, it's a lot cheaper than film school.' 



r^ 



Ruth L Dzeki , 

Director, Halvirfifffie Bones 
Author, My Year of Meats 



Photo; Tom LeGoff 



Design. Nik Ives 



TOTALLY IHDtPfHOfHT^ 

Contribute to the Foundation for Independent Video and Film's three year Millennium Campaign Fund which ensures that AIVF/FIVF (publishers ' 
of Ihe Independent) not only survive, but thrive in their mission to serve the growing and diverse independent media community. 



Name. 



Enclosed is my gift of independence 

in the amount of: 



Address. 
City 



State . 



Zip. 



Home Phone. 



Business Phone. 



I /We wish to be listed in acknowledgements as: 



J $35 
J $50 

J sine 
I 



er 



_| SI5D 

| $200 

_J $500 ,.d, 

Honorary 

Committee 

Member 



Make your check payable tn FIVF and return it with this form to FIVF, 304 Hudson St.. Gth Floor. NY, NY 11113. For more information call (2121 807-1400. act. 223. 
Ihe Foundation for Independent Video and Film is a not-for-profit organization. Your contribution is tax-deductible. 



APRIL 1999 



A Publication of The Foundation for Independent Video and Film www.aivf.org 




■Ji><V]l)^£)A][)j'J-f}Jl,J 




S3.95 us S5.25 can 




Gill Holland 

on Picking 

Your Producer 



Tony 

& OTHER 

SUNDANCE 

WINNERS 



v Bin'; U 



The Politics of 
Exhibition 

Digital Preproduction 

The Casting Director 
as Producer 



o 74470 ll 80114 l " 6 



TELESCRIPTION LIBRARY • STUDIO 54 LIBRARY • PATHE NEWS, INC. • THE BIG PICTURE 




Select from the greatest sources on the planet! 
1 Over 30,000 hours of historic footage 
and musical performance clips. 
Transferred, databased, copyright-cleared 
and instantly available! •* 



A Century of Images 




AMERICANA • COMMERCIALS 

NEWSREELS • VINTAGE TELEVISION 

BEAUTY SHOTS • SLAPSTICK 

HOLLYWC )OD FEA FUR ES 

WILDLIFE • NATURE 

COUNTRY & WESTERN 

ROCK & ROLL •JAZZ & BLUES 





liijM 




i 




i 



STOCK FOOTAGE LIBRARY 
JJ 

Call For Free Demo Reel • 1-800-249-1940 • 516-329-9200 • 516-329-9260 fax 

www.historicfilms.com • info@historicfilms.com 

£ CLASSIC COMEDY LIBRARY • THE RHYTHM & BLUES AWARDS SHOW • STORYViLLE JAZZ COLLEC 






» 



■I 



- 


'"i 






•^11 




I 1 


i^P ■£ 


r \£Z7 




Ei^ 


»JM 






^^PPIS^***^ 


ji^HHillHI 




Fll 


Wa 




(r)iHU 


LAB 



23815 industrial park drive, farmington hills, mi 48335 • voice 248.474.3900 • fax 248.474.1577 



Independent 

' FILM &VDEO MONTHLY 



Publisher: Elizabeth Peters 

Editor in Chief: Patricia Thomson 
[editor@aivf.orgl 

Managing Editor: Paul Power 
hndependent@aivt.orgl 

Listings Editor: Scott Castle 
lfestlvals@aivf.org] 

Intern: Gesha-Marie Bryant 

Contributing Editors: Richard Baimbridge. Michelle Coe, 

Lissa Gibbs, Mark J. Huisman, Gary 0. Larson, Cara Mertes, 

Barbara Bliss Osborn, Rob Rownd, Robert L. Seigel, Esq. 

Design Director: Daniel Christmas 
lstartree@xslte.netl 

Advertising Director: Laura D. Davis 

(212)807-1400x225: 

ldisplayads@alvf.orgl 

Advertising Rep: Scott Castle 

(212)807-1400x233: 

lscott@aivf.orgl 

Articles from The Independent are archived online at 
Iwww.elibrary coml 

• 

National Distribution: Total Circulation 

(Manhattan) (201) 342-6334: 

Ingram Periodicals (800) 627-6247 

Printed in the USA by Cadmus Journal Services 



POSTMASTER Send address changes to: 
The Independent Film & Video Monthly. 304 Hudson St.. 6 1 



. NY. NY 10013. 



77ie Independent Film & Video Monthly (ISSN 0731-5198) is published month- 
ly except February and September by the Foundation tor Independent Video and Film 
(FIVF). a nonprofit, tax-exempt educational foundation dedicated to the promotion of 
video and film Subscription to the magazine ($55/yr individual; $35/yr student, 
$100/yr nonprofit organization; $150/yr business/industry) is included in annual 
membership dues paid to the Association of Independent Video and Filmmakers 
(AIVF). the national trade association of individuals involved in independent film and 
video Library and school subscriptions are $75/yr. Contact; AIVF. 304 Hudson St.. 6 
fl , NY. NY 10013, (212) 807-1400; fax 1212) 463-8519; independent© aivf.org; 
wwwaivf org Periodical Postage Paid at New York. NY, and at additional mailing 
offices. 

Publication of The Independent is made possible in part with public funds from the 
New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, and the National Endowment for 
the Arts, a federal agency. Publication of any advertisement in 77;e Independent 
does not constitute an endorsement AIVF/FIVF are not responsible for any claims 
made in an ad. 

Letters to The Independent should be addressed to the editor Letters may be edit- 
ed for length. All contents are copyright of the Foundation for Independent Video and 
Film, Inc. Reprints require written permission and acknowledgement of the article's 
previous appearance in The IndependentJte Independent is indexed in the 
Alternative Press Index. 

c Foundation for Independent Video & Film, Inc. 1999 
AIVF/FIVF staff; Elizabeth Peters, executive director, Michelle Coe, program & infor- 
mation services director: LaTnce Dixon, membership/advocacy associate; Eugene 
Hernandez, webmaster; Jodi Magee. development consultant Jessica Perez, admin- 
istrative director: Marya Wethers, membership assistant. 

AIVF/FIVF legal counsel; Robert I. Freedman, Esq., Leavy, Rosensweig & Hyman 

AIVF/FIVF Board of Directors; Loni Ding (co-president), Lee Lew-Lee, Graham Leggat, 
Ruby Lerner'. Peter Lewnes. Richard Linklater. Cynthia Lopez*. Diane Markrow (sec- 
retary). Jim McKay. Robb Moss (chair). Elizabeth Peters (ex officio). Robert Richter 
(treasurer). James Schamus* Valerie Soe. Barton Weiss (co-president) 
* FIVF Board of Directors only. 

2 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 




26 Recasting the Casting Director 



As name actors have become more of a necessity for greenlighting independent features, the casting 
director's role has grown in importance. Some are now asking for — and getting — producer credits. 

by Amy Goodman 

29 Someone to Watch Over Me 

Picking a producer is like hiring your own boss. A veteran independent producer offers some words of 
advice to novice directors looking for that special someone to produce their films. 

by Gill Holland 

32 Indie Jones & the Raiders of the Lost Art 

Has the artsyplex boom housebroken independent film? An in-depth look at the politics of arthouse 
exhibition. 

by Rob Nelson 




k. v ■- 




Departments 



Upfront 



5 News 

The Gore Commission Report arrives not with a bang, but a whimper; two 

new distributors open shop. 

by Gary O. Larson, Richard Baimbridge 



10 Profiles 

Jill Godmilow and Cauleen Smith. 
BY Cara M ertes 

&.KATE HAUG 




12 Fest Circuit 

Highlights from the Sundance and Slamdance film festivals. 

by Richard Baimbridge, Mark J. Huisman, 

Cara Mertes, Patricia Thomson & Jay Lowie 



l i 



21 Books 

Short takes on Christine Vachon's Shooting 
to Kill: How an Independent Producer Blasts 
through the Barriers to Make Movies that 
Matter and 

The Filmmaker's Handbook: A 
Comprehensive Guide for the Digital Age, 
by Steven Ascher & Edward Pincus 
by Robert S e i g e l 6k 
Ryan Deussing 

22 Technology 

Digital still cameras make their mark on 
preproduction, revising how to approach 
storyboarding and location scouting. 
by Rob rownd 

25 On View 

Independents opening at a theater or on 
national television this month. 

by Paul Power 



FAQ & Info 

38 Distributor FAQ 

Formed two years ago, Stratosphere 
Entertainment is a hopeful up-and-comer 
in the arena of medium- sized theatrical 
distributors. 

BY LlSSA GIBBS 

40 Funder FAQ 

The Creative Capital Foundation, brand 
new as of January 1999, will be funding 
media, among other disciplines. Heading 
it is former AIVF/FIVF 
executive director Ruby Lerner. 

by Michelle Coe 

Festivals 42 
Notices 48 
Classifieds 52 




David Edelsleii 







@AIVF 



Events 58 

Letter to AIVF Members 59 
Trade Discounts 60 
Salons 61 




Cover: Nguyen Ngoc Hiep in Three Seasons, by Tony Bui, which swept three top awards at the 
Sundance Film Festival. For festival coverage, see pages 12 - 16. Photo courtesy October Films 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 3 



B 



: 



'todggsi 



.J--X* 



;*Bs4L 9*€+*P 




"K 



^V 



Nobody has the 20th Century covered with news footage like ABCNEWS VideoSource! 



*> f X*:f-. 







From the turn of the century to its approaching 
climax, the historical events that have shaped our 
times are mere fingertips away. 

Your Source for the 20th Century! 

Nobody in the footage business has as much 
news footage as ABCNews VideoSource! We've combined 
three of the world's finest news and stock footage 
collections - ABC News, Worldwide Television News, 



and British Movietone News - at America's newest 
and most modern footage resource. If it happened from 
1900 right up to today, we've got it covered! 

The great thing is, it's all so easy to access. 
Just click us up on the Web or, even better, come visit 
our fantastic facility in person. Our highly-skilled 
and footage-sawy Customer Service Representatives 
will simplify your search. It's footage searching the 
way it should be! 



For the fastest, easiest way to find 
the exact footage you want, come to the Source! 

©ABCNEWS 

VideoSource 

125 West End Avenue at 66th Street • New York, NY 10023 
800 • 789 • 1250 • 212 • 456 • 5421 ♦ FAX 212 • 456 • 5428 

Visit http://www.abcnewsvsource.com 



©1998 



TELECOM 



THE GORE 
COMMISSION REPORT 

Expanding the Vast Wasteland 



Between the impeachment proceedings in 
Washington and the bombing runs over Iraq, 
the mid-December release of a final report by 
the Advisory Committee on Public Interest 
Obligations of Digital Television Broadcasters 



al scandal," citing in particular its failure to 
address spiraling campaign costs by requiring 
broadcasters to provide free airtime to political 
candidates. Ironically, 14 of the panel's 22 
members had supported such a requirement 



ic 






Advisory Committee on Public Intere 
Obligations of Digital Teievision Broadcasters 



NEWS 



EDITED BY PAUL POWER 

Actually, we won't have to wait quite that 
long to lament the Gore Commission's failure. 
The digital television roll-out has already 
begun in several cities, and DTV signals will be 
available to half of all households by year's end. 
Adoption by large numbers of households will 
proceed much more slowly, but once affordable 
set-top boxes become widely available after the 
turn of the century, we'll begin to see the real 
fruits of the digital television harvest. It won't 
be the high-definition television broadcasts 
we've heard so much about (a 
money-losing proposition until 
monitors large enough to take 
advantage of the HDTV stan- 
dard become much more com- 
mon), but rather multiplexed 
signals. Such digital magic will 



„. 



The official Gore Commission web site. 

didn't stand much of a chance. Even on a slow 
news day, this was not the kind of material to 
create much of a stir. Still, the issue under con- 
sideration — determining what the nation's 
1,600 TV stations owe their communities in 
exchange for free use of the public airwaves — 
remains a vital one, especially as the Federal 
Communications Commission prepares to take 
up the matter in a formal rulemaking process. 
At stake is a range of new civic, educational, 
and cultural programming that will be possible, 
given the vastly expanded capacity of the new 
digital TV platform, but not very probable in 
light of the current diminished state of public- 
service regulations. 

The so-called "Gore Commission," appoint- 
ed by the Clinton administration in the sum- 
mer of 1997, was in a position to strengthen 
those regulations, but it wasn't quite up to the 
task. Like a lot of blue-ribbon committees 
formed in Washington over the years, this lat- 
est version (pitting such noncommercial stal- 
warts as the Independent Television Service's 
James Yee and children's television pioneer 
Peggy Charren against such industry insiders as 
CBS president Leslie Moonves and USA 
Networks chairman Barry Diller) came up with 
a typically colorless set of recommendations 
(www.ntia.doc.gov/pubintadvcom/piac 
report.pdf and www.benton.org/PIAC). So 
bland was the committee's final report, in fact, 
that the reaction to its tepid recommenda- 
tions — including some strong dissenting opin- 
ions from several of the panel's own members — 
proved far more newsworthy. 

A Los Angeles Times editorial entitled 
"Airwave Avarice" called the report a "nation- 



before caving in to industry pressure and call- 
ing for a voluntary "five minutes each night for 
candidate-centered discourse in the thirty days 
before an election." National PTA President 
Lois Jean White, meanwhile, a dissenting 
member of the committee, brought her criti- 
cism much closer to home: "The recommen- 
dations contained in the report do little to pro- 
mote, and nothing to secure, the interests of 
families and children." 
But leave it to for- 
mer FCC chairman 
Newton Minow to 
come up with the best 
line of all. The man 
who bestowed the 
"vast wasteland" label 
on network television 
in 1962 had equally 
sharp words for the 
consensus-driven 
process of the Gore 
Commission, one that 
sought common 

ground between the 
TV moguls and their 
critics before arriving, after over a year of delib- 
erations, at a decidedly unhappy medium. 
"[T]he price paid for this laudable effort to 
accommodate conflicting views," wrote Minow 
in his dissent to the full committee report, "left 
us with a low common denominator at a time 
when we need a broader vision equal to the 
promise of new digital channels ... Our grand- 
children will one day regret our failure to meet 
one of the great communications opportunities 
in the history of democracy." 



yield four or more extra chan- 
nels of programming for each existing station in 
the country, along with a variety of computer 
data services. The potential for this new pro- 
gramming environment to serve the public 
interest — including the interest of independent 
video and filmmakers — is incalculable. But in 
the absence of adequate new public-interest 
requirements, the digital TV revolution will 
likely prove even less hospitable to public ser- 
vice than network television is today, if that's 
possible. 



Celebrating "the high standards of public service 
that most stations follow and that represent the 
ideals and historic traditions of the industry," the 
committee's attempt to build a regulatory frame- 
work out of wishful thinking was doomed from the 
outset. The road to primetime in the new digital era, 
it seems, will be paved with good intentions — along 
with pay-per-view programming, home shopping, 
and personalized advertising. 



It cannot be said, on the other hand, that 
the Gore Commission didn't tackle the impor- 
tant issues, including plans for enumerating 
specific public-interest requirements, for set- 
ting aside space for noncommercial program- 
ming, and for developing local alternatives to 
the existing public broadcasting bulwark. But 
the recommendations that the panel ultimately 
came up with in these areas, vague and lofty 
promises at best, were compromised beyond 
recognition. In one of its most extraordinary, 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 5 



ead i ng for 



new millennium? 






C; 



C-? 



Q 



^ 



*4»g~ 






^f'^ 



,"*«.*' 



|f 



- m 



*it~ 



\ ; : 



check out our on-line database: 



The past is always with us ... in the most in-depth selec- 
tion of historical stock footage and photos on earth. Reel 
or real, our images can help you document the last two mil- 
lennia of human achievement, from man's first upright step to 
the walk on the moon. 

Give us a call today and we'll give you an eyeful of 
yesterday: 30,000 phenomenal hours of historical, lifestyle 
and entertainment footage, plus over 20 million historical and 
news photographs. All computer-cataloged and copyright- 
cleared, with thousands of images already available in digital 
form. So your next film or multimedia project can really fly! 



THE TOTAL PICTURE OF HUMAN EXPERIENCE 



w www.arcniveTiims.com 




TM 

Archive Films 


Archive Photos 


800-875-4798 



k^l 



5* 



e> 



. W 



.^!S 



- \>*? 



w*r 



0*0*^ „ ** * 1 



a j> 



530 W. 25th Street, Dept. IND, New York, NY 10001 
Phone (212) 822-7800 ■ Fax (212) 645-2137 ■ e-mail: salesaarchivefilms.com 



fox-guarding- the -henhouse recommendations, 
the Gore Commission called on the National 
Association of Broadcasters — vocal in its oppo- 
sition to the committee process from the out- 
set — to draft a new voluntary code of conduct. 
The committee favored, in its own words, "pol- 
icy approaches that rely on information disclo- 
sures, voluntary self-regulation, and economic 
incentives, as opposed to regulation." In other 
words, in exchange for the free use of what is 
estimated to be $70 billion worth of spectrum 
for the eight-year digital transition, the broad- 
casters will be asked merely to conduct business 
as usual. Celebrating "the high standards of 
public service that most stations follow and 
that represent the ideals and historic traditions 
of the industry," the committee's attempt to 
build a regulatory framework out of wishful 
thinking was doomed from the outset. The road 
to primetime in the new digital era, it seems, 
will be paved with good intentions — along with 
pay-per-view programming, home shopping, 
and personalized advertising. 

For all its shortcomings, however, the Gore 
Commission at least managed to identify a pair 
of issues that warrant further study. "First, the 
recommendation that "the FCC should adopt a 
set of minimum public interest requirements for 
digital television broadcasters" raises the possi- 
bility that federal regulators will be able to do 
what the all-star panel could not: lift the pub- 
lic-service obligations from their current 
embarrassingly low level (namely, the scattering 
of late-night public-service announcements, 
three paltry hours of allegedly educational chil- 
dren's programming each week, and some of 
the shallowest local news coverage this side of 
the supermarket tabloids) to something approx- 
imating genuine public service. But even the 
least onerous new requirements are sure to 
incur the wrath of the NAB and its multi-mil- 



DISTRIBUTION 



lion-dollar lobbying operation. It's not clear 
whether the new FCC chairman William E. 
Kennard, who assumed his post in the fall of 
1997, will prove any less resistant than the 
Gore Commission to industry pressure. 

Second, in the area of educational program- 
ming, the Gore Commission came up with a 
three-pronged strategy, calling for (1) the cre- 
ation of a trust fund for the support of public 
broadcasting ("to remove it from the vicissi- 
tudes of the political process"); (2) the reserva- 
tion of the digital equivalent of 6 MHz of ana- 
log spectrum for noncommercial educational 
programming in each community (when, some- 
time after 2006, the stations return the extra 
channel space they were lent for the transition 
to digital broadcast); and (3) the incorporation 
of noncommercial, community-service material 
by those stations using the new digital platform 
for potentially lucrative Internet datacasting 
activities. In one of its most profound under- 
statements, the commission acknowledged that 
"the market alone may not provide program- 
ming that can adequately serve children, the 
governing process, special community needs, 
and the diverse voices in the country." 

That frank admission might well serve as a 
starting point (along with an acknowledgment 
that public broadcasting as it currently exists is 
equally ill-equipped, financially and philosoph- 
ically, to serve community and diversity) for the 
FCC deliberations. A consortium of advocacy 
organizations, led by the the Civil Rights 
Forum, the Project on Media Ownership, and 
Center for Media Education (and including 
AIVF, among 40 other organizations), has 
formed to press the case for new public-interest 
obligations. Thus the work left unfinished by the 
Gore Commission can now begin. Stay tuned. 

Gary O. Larson 

Gary O. Larson lglarson(<>arts<wire.com] is a 
contributing editor at The Independent 



NEW HOPEFULS 

Indican & Urbanworld Films Hang Out Shingles 



TWO NEW COMPANIES HAVE RECENTLY 
announced plans to step into the ring of 
national theatrical distribution for independent 
films, hoping to capitalize on smaller films and 
niche markets that they believe are being over- 
looked in an environment of distributors who 
are increasingly allying themselves with larger 
studios and corporations. Late last year, Indican 



Pictures, a Los Angeles-based distribution com- 
pany, entered the scene with their first release, 
a feature addressing neo-Nazi violence, called 
Pariah. The film, directed by Randolph Kret, 
received commendations from the NAACP 
and Martin Luther King Foundation that 
American History X, which was released by New 
Line around the same time and deals with sim- 




ilar subject matter, failed to receive. Pariah 
opened in Pittsburgh this January and has had a 
national release, screening in venues from Iowa 
City to New York and Los Angeles, while 
Indican's second pickup, John Reiss' Cleopatra's 
Second Husband, is due for a late summer 
release. 

Meanwhile, Stacey Spikes, former Miramax 
and October Films marketing exec, as well as 
current executive director of the Urbanworld 
Film Festival, also recently announced plans to 
open a distribution company, name Urbanworld 
Films, which he says will release approximately 
10 titles per year, mostly (though not exclusive- 
ly) for African American audiences. "Though 
we are related, the Urbanworld distribution 
company will be a completely separate entity 
from the Urbanworld Film Festival," Spikes says 
from the company's New York headquarters. 

These two announcements come at a time 
when most news surrounding the indie distribu- 
tion market is of companies such as Miramax 
and October merging with major studios. Yet it 
is exactly that phenomenon, says 30-year-old 
Kevin Ramon, vicepresident and head of mar- 
keting for Indican, that inspired him and his 
partners (most of whom are in their late 20s, 
with little direct industry experience) to get into 
the business. "Since distributors like October 
and Fine Line have all moved into the studio 
system, we feel that they have left a vacuum in 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 7 




their wake. A lot of good films that would've 
been picked up just a few years ago are now 
being missed," Ramon says. "We see this as an 
opportunity to pick up the films that we believe 
are powerful and give them a real chance." 

Spikes says Urbanworld also saw a niche in 
the studio system that he thinks it can fill. 
"There is a huge void," says Spikes. "African 
Americans make up one quarter of all box 
office sales, spending $1 billion a year. If you 
look at those averages, you see that out of the 
300-400 films released, at least 100 should be 
black films. Yet, on average, only about 15 
black films are being made. If we can double 
that and get just ten percent of the [African 
American] box office, you're looking at a little 
company sailing to the tune of $100 million a 
year." 

With the success of the Urbanworld Festival, 
which in only two years has managed to 
become a force in the industry, premiering such 
hits as Soul Food and How Stella Got Her Groove 
Back, Spikes' expectations seem feasible. 
Importantly, he adds, Urbanworld Films will 
also be focusing on the much-overlooked 
potential among African American tilmgoers to 
support independent film. "We will be going 
out and conducting a grassroots campaign to 
create support for independent films by, for 
example, going to historically black colleges 
and doing promotion there," Spikes says. 
Urbanworld Films further hopes to bring what 
Spikes calls "the Gospel market" to movie the- 
aters by getting black Broadway and off- 
Broadway productions like Bring in da Noise, 
Bring in da Funk to the big screen. 

But, even with all the hopes and good inten- 
tions of Indican and Urbanworld Films, the sta- 
tistics are clearly against them. 

Jeffrey Jacobs, who booked New York's 
Angelika theater for seven years before it was 
sold to Reading Entertainment in late 97 and 
who remains one of the nation's leading book- 
ing agents, scrolls down his list of clients, not- 
ing approximately 90 active distribution com- 
panies in the U.S. today. "Of those," he says, 
"about 90 percent of the films I book come 
from less than 30 distributors. After those 30, 
I'd say that perhaps 40 others occasionally have 
films." 

Jacobs says that though technically there are 
more distribution companies than there were 
12 years ago, the actual number of players in 

ERRATA 

On the cover of the March 1999 issue, 

St.Clair Bourne's name was misspelled. 

The Independent apologizes for this error. 



8 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



POES YOUR UBRARY 

HAVE THE 

INDEPENDENT? 

Take this coupon to your 
school or public librarian and 
request a subscription today! 

10 issues/yr. 

Library subscription rate $75 

($90 foreign) 

Published by the Foundation for 

Independent Video and Film 

ISSN 0731-0589 

Order from FIVF, 

304 Hudson St., 6th FL, NY, NY 10013; 

(212) 807-1400 x222; members@aivf.org 

EBSCO: (205) 991-6600 

fax: (205) 991-1479 

Faxon (US): (800) 283-2966; 

(Can) (519) 472-1005 
(Can) fax: (519) 472-1072 



Get these essential books delivered right to your door! 

Liquidation Special on ATVF/FIVF books 

The AIVF/FIVF Guide to International Film & Video Festivals 

Kathryn Bowser, ed.; $17 $ 

The ATVFIFFVF Guide to Film & Video Distributors 

Kathryn Bowser, ed.; $12 $ 

The Next Step: A Film and Video Distribution Handbook 

Morrie Warshawski, ed.; $12 $ 

OR...order all three for just $30 and save! $ 

Alternative Visions: Distributing Independent Video 

in a Home Video World Debra Franco; $9.95 $ 

Contracts for the Film & Television Industry 

Mark Litwak; $29.95 $ 

Director's Journey Mark Travis; $26.95 $ 

Directing Actors: Creating Memorable Performances 

for Film and TV Judith Weston; $26.95 $ 

Film and Video Budgets Michael Wiese; $26.95 $ 

Film and Video Financing Michael Wiese; $22.95 $ 

Film and Video Marketing Michael Wiese; $18.95 $ 

Film Directing Shot by Shot: Visualizing from Concept 

to Screen Steven D. Katz; $24.95 $ 

Film Directing Shot by Shot: Cinematic Motion 

Steven D. Katz; $24.95 $ 

The Independent Film & Videomakers Guide (2nd Ed.) 

Michael Wiese; $29.95 $ 

Persistence of Vision: An Impractical Guide 
to Producing a Feature Film For Under $30,000 

John Gaspard & Dale Newton; $26.95 $ 

Production Assistant Guidelines Sandy Curry; $6.00 $ 

The Search for Reality: The Art of 

Documentary Filmmaking Michael Tobias, ed; $29.95 $ 

Surviving Production: The Art of 

Production Management Deborah Patz; $26.95 $ 

The Writer's Journey (2nd Ed.) 
| Christopher Vogler; $22.95 $ 

Postage/handling: US - $3.50 1st book, $1.00 ea. addl 

Foreign - $5.00 1st book, $1.50 ea. addl $ 



TOTAL 



Make checks payable to FIVF, and send order to: 304 Hudson St., 6th Fl., 
New York, NY 10013; or charge by phone: (212) 807-1400 x303; 
fax: (212) 463-8519, or order from our website: www.aivf.org. 

Look for our new self-distribution resource books coming soon! 



■ 



& 



»,>»> 



the market is shrinking, not expanding. "After 
these larger companies like Artisan, October, 
and New Line, who have the money to do pro- 
motion and get prints made, acquire all the 
good films, there's just not that much left," he 
says. "But there's always room in the industry 
for someone who has a good film that people 
will go see. There's never been a time that I 
know of when there's been enough good films 
to fill theaters 52 weeks out of the year. 

For their part, Ramon says Indican Pictures 
believes the key to success will be the compa- 
ny's ability to go beyond traditional arthouse 
releases, bringing indie film to Cinemark and 
United Artist theaters (with whom they have 
effectively established a first-look relationship), 
while still developing arthouse venues in parts 
of the country that he thinks are being neglect- 
ed. Indican will also stress a very direct rela- 
tionship with the filmmakers, he notes. 



"If one of our films fails, it's going to be 
everybody's responsibility, including the film- 
maker, because they'll be with us every step of 
the way," Ramon says, citing Six-String Samurai 
as a film he wished he'd had a crack at distrib- 
uting. "I think that could've been a midnight 
movie classic," he laments. 

Urbanworld's recipe for success is to be to 
African American and other minority film- 
makers what Miramax is to indie filmmakers. 
"Indies want to be with Miramax because of 
the company's reputation in dealing with 
independent film," Spikes says. "That's how 
we'd like to be perceived, as well." 

Either way, for small-scale distribution 
companies in today's big business environ- 
ment, the road ahead is an increasingly diffi- 
cult one. 

Richard Baimbridge 

Richard Baimbridge is a regular contributor 
to The Independent. 



PUBLIC TV 



Missing LlnCS 



ITVS revises station 

Circle April 30th in your calendars: this is 

the application deadline for a new Independent 
Television Service initiative entitled LlnCS 
(Local Independents Collaborating with 
Stations). The LlnCS program is designed to 
facilitate full production partnerships between 
independent producers and local public TV 
stations and has emerged to replace and 
improve on the successful Station-Independent 
Partnership Production (SIPP) fund. 

LlnCS will provide incentive or matching 
funds (from $10,000 to $65,000) to any 
approved partnerships, representing an 
increase on SIPP's ceiling of $50,000. Other 
differences include the administration of the 
$1 million annual fund centrally by the 
Independent Television Service (ITVS), 
instead of through a number of local network 
agencies, and the fact that station funding will 
now match all funds raised, not just station-in- 



partnership program 

kind funds. 

"We're focusing on civic discourse, shows 
that'll get people to talk about issues in their 
community," says Heidi Schuster, production 
manager at ITVS in charge of LlnCS. "We fund 
the kind of shows that don't get shown else- 
where and take creative risks," she continues, 
adding that regionally and culturally diverse 
projects will be considered. Casting the net fair- 
ly wide, LlnCS is looking for series, single 
shows, and interstitial packages plus projects in 
any genre or stage of development. The LlnCS 
panel will make decisions during the summer, 
and the first programs will go to contract in 
early fall. 

For further info, contact ITVS at (415) 356- 
8383 x. 444 or download an application form 
from www.itvs.org 

Paul Power 



Quote of the Month 

"Even recognizing shorts as eligible with a gnat-like seven-day life in a theater, we've 
seen both the numbers and the quality of [Oscar-qualifying short documentary] 
entries diminish to the point that some years we're embarrassed to be listing some of 
our nominees in our historical record. " 

— Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences President Robert Rehme, in response to a letter from 

AJVF's Board of Directors protesting the Academy's decision to abolish the Documentary Best Short 

category in 1 999. Read Rehme s entire response and get involved in ATVF's online discussion: www.aivf.org 



MfVkS, 

@ 3 t 

UAT£f 



Mm 



€veri±thing far 
Past Production 



FULL LABORATORY $€RVIC€$ 

T€L€Cin€ 

€DITORIAL 

Post Prod. Supervisors 

Dailies pricing 

€dge Coding 

Film €diting 

Digital nonlinear 
Flatbed 

Assistant €diting 

On-Line €diting 

€quipment Rental 
$P€CIAL €FF€CTS 

Digital/Optical 

SounD 

Design 

€diting 

€ffects 

Foleu 

ADR 

(Tlixing 

Sweetening' 

Transfers 

1/4" to fTlag. 
DAT to mag. 
mag. to Optical 

music 

Composing 

Recording 

€diting 

Libraru 
VID€0 DUBBIfN 
TITL€$ & CR€I 
n€GATIV€ CI 

VID€0 TO Filial? n*F€RS 
DIGITAL TO FILI 





.m TRAfttF€R5 



UUe are an independent Group 

of Businesses that make uour 

Post Production nightmare a 

DR€ Am 



For more Information call 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 9 




Jill Godmilow 

WHAT FAROCKI TAUGHT 



by Cara Mertes 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 





I 




j y 






E 


>s 


k 


f 


1^1 • 


H % 


1 


•%**^*^^ 


N , 


• 


k. 




§? 




; 


* 







Jill Godmilow is distressed. The liberal 
documentary form, she writes, "is soft, inade- 
quate, and a relatively useless cultural form." 
With its reliance on description, evidence, and 
emotionality, it is currently the lingua franca of 
American documentary style, and, according to 
Godmilow's critique, it is a tradition bereft of 
thought-provoking models to which documen- 
tarians can turn for new strategies — filmmakers 
who believe that documentary should be social- 
ly engaged, formally innovative, and should 
catalyze action. 

Godmilow's 30-year career as one of 
America's most interesting and unpredictable 
independent filmmakers is laced with chal- 
lenges like this to dominant filmmaking prac- 
tice. Though Godmilow has made both nonfic- 



tion and fiction films, she is known primarily 
for her documentaries and is given to intricate 
experiments with filmic form. Her focus — 
obsession even — is with narrative, whether fic- 
tional, factual, or more commonly, a little of 
both. 

"I've been lucky enough to do films I wanted 
to do," Godmilow says when asked about her 
eclectic career. Nominated for an Oscar with 
her 1974 film, Antonia: 
Portrait of a Woman (co- 
directed with Judy Collins), 
Godmilow saw success early 
and has continued to pro- 
duce and direct through the 
seventies, eighties, and 
nineties. Each decade has 
seen major new works: Far 
from Poland (1984); Waiting 
for the Moon (1986); Roy 
Cohn/]ack Smith (1995) — 
all films that stubbornly 
patrol the borders of docu- 
mentary and fiction. 
Atilmmaker's filmmaker, 
Godmilow is dedicated to 
expanding the film form, 
marshaling her considerable 
skills as a storyteller to 
weave performance, poli- 
tics, and history in new 
combinations. Her newest 
piece, What Farocki Taught, 
is paradoxically someone 
else's film. She has spent 
over a year re-making, 
frame by frame, a 1969, 22- 
minute, black-and-white 
film called MCHT loschbare 
Feuer (Inextinguishable Fire), 
the first tilm made by Harun Farocki, now one 
of Germany's most accomplished documentari- 
ans. "It was a film I wish I had made and that 
everybody had seen," she explains, "so I made it 
again, exactly, and made sure it was well dis- 
tributed." In a single audacious move, 
Godmilow has created a provocation and a 
pedagogical tool simultaneously. (Oddly, the 
phenomenon is not confined to Godmilow. 
Both videomaker Elizabeth Subrin and film 
director Gus van Sant have replicated films 
over the last 18 months as well, making 
remakes of Shulie and Psycho, respectively.) 

Originally made for German television, 
Inextinguishable Fire was a protest against the 
Vietnam War, conceived in opposition to the 
way conventional documentaries about the war 



were being made. Rather than relying on heart- 
rending actuality footage of atrocities and war- 
time inhumanity to horrify and move his audi- 
ence, Farocki's film is a deceptively simple 
scripted series of monologues and short 
exchanges that take place in a generic research 
setting representing the Dow Chemicals plant 
in Illinois, where Napalm B was perfected. 

Napalm B was one of the Vietnam War's 
most appalling weapons. A gasoline -based, jelly- 
like substance that ignites on contact and burns 
at 3000 degrees fahrenheit, it was dumped out 
of planes onto Vietnamese villages and civilians. 
It will not come off once applied and cannot be 
extinguished. 

Farocki's approach to such a loaded subject 
was startlingly direct. He starts his film as nar- 
rator by asking, "How can we show you the 
damage caused by napalm. 7 If we show you pic- 
tures of napalm damage, you will close your 
eyes. First you will close your eyes to the picture. 
Then you will close your eyes to the memory. 
Then you will close your eyes to the facts. Then 
you will close your eyes to the connections 
between them. If we show you a picture of 
someone with napalm burns, we will hurt your 
feelings. If we hurt your feelings, you will feel as 
if we have just tried out napalm on you, at your 
expense. We can give you only a weak demon- 
stration of how napalm works." He then reach- 
es off-screen, picks up a lit cigarette, and puts it 
out on the back of his hand. 

Farocki's solutions to the problems of repre- 
sentation — re-enactments, an analysis of labor, 
self-reflexive representation strategies — are an 
extension of European forays into the possibili- 
ties of the documentary form. Like Jean Rouch, 
Chris Marker, Alexander Kluge, and Jean-Luc 
Godard, Farocki tackles questions of truth- 
telling, historical representation, and audience 
with an intellectual vigor that has a long histo- 
ry in Europe. By contrast, in America such 
experiments are infrequent and appear radical. 
And according to Godmilow, they are critical to 
explore in order to escape the pitfalls of liberal 
documentary. 

What Farocki Taught, then, is an homage as 
well as an artistic manifesto; an attempt to cap- 
ture some of the vitality of the original, and re- 
situate it in a contemporary context that cries 
out for a type of political analysis beyond the 1 
fetishization of personality and image that are I 
prevalent in the U.S. today. In Farocki's terms, f 
What Farocki Taught is a weak model of a weak Z 
model — a shadow of the original — challenging ° 
filmmakers and viewers to reconsider their g 
assumptions about film. Like Farocki, Godmil- £ 



10 THE INDEPENDENT April 15 



ow asks her audience to consider how each 
individual engages in acts that add up to the 
production of violence and terror known as 
war. 

What Farocki Taught: Video Data Bank in 
Chicago, (312) 345-3550. 

CARA MERTES 

Cara Merles is an independent producer/director 

and writer based in New York City, currently 

teaching at Hunter College. 



Cauleen Smith 



DRYLONGSO (ORDINARY) 



by Kate Haug 



In a 1995 interview, Cauleen Smith Ex- 
pressed ambivalence about her reputation as a 
successful experimental filmmaker. Her films 
Daily Rains (1990) and Chronicles of a Lying 
Spirit by Kelly Gabron (1992) were by then well 
known and highly regarded for their complex 
discussion of race, history, and representation. 

It's now four years later, and Smith is once 
again on the brink of success, this time with 
her first dramatic feature, Drylongso (ordinary). 
After the 1998 Independent Feature Film 
Market, Village Voice critic Amy Taubin 
remarked that Drylongso (ordinary) was "the 
only feature film [at IFFM] that moved me." 
The film has since moved onto the festival cir- 
cuit, playing at such major roadstops as 
Sundance and Berlin. 

Smith's ambition to cross the divide be- 
tween the circumscribed world of academic 
circulation and mainstream audiences is now 
being realized. Yet the filmmaker remains the 
same: "I'm just as ambivalent about main- 
streaming as about being experimental. The 
potential here is for accessing more people and 
playing with form ... I feel that I'm accepting 
the challenges of mainstreaming and all that 
comes with it — the good and the bad. It's an 
interesting fight, if nothing else." 

Drylongso (ordinary) is the story of Pica 
(Toby Smith) and Tobi (April Barnett), two 
young African American women coming into 
their own in Oakland, California. Although 
the protagonists come from different class 
backgrounds, they are both live in a context of 
everyday violence. While there have been sev- 
eral coming-of-age films about African Ameri- 
can men, and rappers have chronicled their 
lives through music, Smith wanted her film to 
describe an adolescent girl's experience. Pica's 



artistic work and political consciousness 
revolve around the high incarceration and 
death rates of African American men, yet it is 
her own development that advances the plot. 

As an experimental director, Smith had 
never represented violence on screen. During 
the filming of a murder scene, she thought, 
"This is what selling out is. I'm standing here. I 
have a gun. I have a woman shooting a man in 
a film because that's the way you have to tell 
the story in this form." But as a storyteller, she 
sees an interdependence between narrative 
and extreme, often violent action: "You need 
forces to come and overtake characters in 
order to get them to another place. In the 
course of our everyday lives, that takes nine 
months. In the course of a ninety-minute 
movie, that takes nine minutes." 

Drylongso is not overwhelmed by violence. 
Far from it. The complexity of Smith's charac- 
ters and their day-to-day lives is presented with 
clarity and subtlety. Pica and Tobi are involved 
in extraordinary circumstances, but retain the 
shape of everyday people. "It's like those neigh- 
borhood people," says Smith of her characters. 
"They are not part of hiphop or the news. It's 
the other eighty percent." 

Although many experimental filmmakers 
have an interest in the commercial world, it's a 
difficult bridge to cross. As an undergraduate 
at San Francisco State University, Smith 
worked with experimental filmmakers Lynn 
Hershman and Trinh T. Minh-ha. But for her 
graduate work, she chose the more commer- 
cially geared UCLA. Although the graduate 
curriculum does not encourage it, she took her 
newly acquired skills and produced Drylongso. 

Smith raised funds the way she knew how — 
from foundations and grants. The Rockefeller 
Foundation, American Film Institute, and 
National Black Programming Consortium all 
contributed funds. She didn't believe any fea- 
ture producers would be interested. And 
besides, "I didn't have the pressure of investors 
while I was shooting," she says. "That was 
something I didn't want or need." 

Her experience with experimental shorts 
gave her an invaluable foundation for this larg- 
er project: "Shorts allow you the freedom to 
focus in on a particular emotion, idea, or 
image. You explore and push it to the outer 
boundaries in a very concentrated way. It's like 
exercising a particular muscle." 

Working with actors, she reflects, was "the 
biggest hurdle, the biggest struggle for me. 
Because I was intimidated by actors at that 
point." She relied heavily on the casting 



process to find her performances. "It's all about 
the casting. I can't take credit for the way the 
actors move in and out of emotions fluidly." For 
casting, Smith found, "Just talking to an actor is 
more enlightening in terms of what they're 
going to be able to do than an audition." 

With no budget for rehearsals, Smith did a 
lot of primary work on set. But like many inde- 
pendent directors, she shot Drylongso quickly — 
in 22 days, to be exact. (She then spent the 
next three years in the editing room.) What 
helped her move so quickly on set was a thor- 
ough knowledge of her story. The most impor- 
tant parts of her two-month preproduction 
were "hashing over the story, doing the story- 
boards, location scouting, and just spending 




time at the locations. It was critical to know 
what was possible at a certain place and being 
really familiar with it." This way, when time was 
running out, Smith knew exactly what the nar- 
rative needed to work and how it could be shot. 

While Drylongso marks a significant change 
in Smith's filmmaking process, her experimen- 
tal foundation shows through. Just as her shorts 
are formally evocative, so too is her narrative. 
Smith strategically brings her avant-garde 
background to the feature. "Drylongso has 
moments where it plays a lot and then goes 
back to the regular movie. I would definitely 
attribute that to the experimental thing." 

Drylongso (ordinary): Neil Friedman, 
Menemsha Entertainment, 1157 S. Beverly 
Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90035; (310) 712- 
3720. 

Kate Haug 

Kate Haug is a filmmaker living in Los Angeles. 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 11 



IVAL CIRCUIT 



SUNDANCE '99 

The Best and the Worst 



digita 



f it's January, it must be Park City. 
The Sundance Film Festival, 
unequivocally the most important 
event of the year for independents, 
drew another record audience 
(12,000) and number of submissions 
(1,300 features altogether, including 
840 American dramatic features). At 
this last edition of the millennium, 
movies started creeping into the line-up, 



money, given its $10 million production bud- 
get.) 

Sundance is different things to different peo- 
ple: a showcase, a market, a zoo, a ski vacation, 
a nonstop party. But everyone agrees that it's 
the best occasion to get a preview of the year's 
indie releases. With the following awards, The 
Independent tips its hat to some of the meritori- 
ous films and memorable moments of 
Sundance '99 (and its satellites): 



Filmmaker Barbara Sonneborn 

and her translator, Xuan Ngoc 

Evans, both war widows who deal 

with their loss in Regret to Inform. 




Theme of the Year: 

Vietnam 

In Vietnam, they call it the American 
War; in America, it was the Living Room 
War. It was over 30 years ago that 
Americans started debating in earnest 
whether Vietnam was a place that 



documentaries stole the limelight, and the 
number of spin-off events soared. (In addition 
to the five-year-old Slamdance, there were 
Lapdance, Soul Dance, No Dance, Vandance, 
and IndieDog among the renegades, plus 
enough concerts to start luring music critics to 
this mountain resort town.) 

With only one prominent bidding war (tor 
Happy, Texas, bought by Miramax for $2.5 mil- 
lion, plus a hefty back end), film acquisitions 
were more level-headed than in previous 
years, largely remaining below the $1.2 million 
mark. This no doubt reflects the disappointing 
box office of recent Sundance "hits." 
(According to Filmmaker magazine's annual 
domestic box office chart of Sundance films, 
only eight of 1998's releases grossed the equiv- 
alent of their production budgets. Most earned 
in the $2 million range or lower, with the 
exception of Smoke Signals ($6,750,000), The 
Opposite of Sex ($6,100,000) Next Stop 
Wonderland ($3,390,000), and The Spanish 
Prisoner ($9,580,000), the latter actually losing 



12 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 






by Richard Baimbridge, 

Mark J. Huisman, 

Cara Mertes & 

Patricia Thomson 

that loss is universal, no matter which side you 
are on. From another angle, filmmakers Frieda 
Lee Mock and Terry Sanders use interviews and 
Vietnamese film documentation of prisoners of 
war in Return with Honor to reveal the stories of 
American POWs who survived the infamous 
Hanoi Hilton. In Chuck Workman's The 
Source, protest against the Vietnam war is 
included in his portrait of the Beat Generation. 
And in the fiction arena, Tony Bui's first fea- 
ture, Three Seasons, chronicles the lives of sev- 
eral characters in contemporary Vietnam. 

— CM 

Scariest Indie Film of the Decade: 

The Blair Witch Project 

Sheer, unadulterated terror. That's what the 
three actors convincingly convey as they 
improvise their way through The Blair Witch 




American soldiers should be fighting. Memories 
about the war run deep, and this year there 
were a group of films that explored the Vietnam 
War from very different angles. 

Barbara Sonnenborn's 10-year effort, Regret 
to Inform, is an in-depth look at the war from 
the point of view of young war widows. 
(Sonnenborn herself became a widow in her 
early twenties.) A story rarely heard, 
Sonnenborn seeks out not only American 
women, but Vietnamese as well, in her belief 



Project. The set-up: a filmmaking trio backpack f 
into the woods to investigate a local legend, the 
Blair Witch, and they're never seen again. A 
year later their footage is found, which is what 
we're ostensibly viewing. The result is a fiction 
film that has many viewers convinced it's the 
real thing. In some respects it is. Florida-based 
directors Eduardo Sanchez and Daniel Myrick 
had no shooting script; rather, each day they 
left the actors minimal cues about destination 
and action — and a decreasing amount of food. 



The Triple Crown Winner 

by Mark J. Hui 

His leading actor hasn't yet won an award for his many fabric of modern Vietnam." 



acclaimed performances, but first-time director Tony 
Bui took home a shelf full from Sundance. Three 




Three Seasons, due 



Seasons, Bui 



TOJOTiMflagiMaMicaMiililBni 



A dreamlike series of events that began at the 1996 
Sundance producers' lab (where he met 
the film's producers, Open City's Joanna 
Vicente and Jason Kliot), Bui's project, 
was off and running. October Films had 
already expressed interest, but it quickly 
solidified when Harvey Keitei came 
aboard as executive producer and actor. 
This enabled the producers to get a com- 
pletion bond from Film Financers, the 
first ever for an American production in 
Vietnam. With a $2 million budget and a 
four-month schedule, Three Seasons 
was ready to go. Among the obstacles 
were language— Bui and his co-pro- 
wns, due fa^ brother Timothy, were the only 
Americans who spoke Vietnamese, so 
translators were hired — and the physi- 
cal change being wrought on the country by its 



and people of his native Vietnam, took the Best overnight discovery as new capital market. 



Cinematography prize (Lisa Rinzler was the director of 



"Saigon was changing every single day," Bui whis- 



photography), the Audience Award for Best Dramatic per s with amazement. "We shot a street scene from 
Feature, and the Grand Jury Prize for Best Dramatic ne angle and the art department went out to make 



Feature. 

Bui was born in Saigon, where his father was a mil- 
itary officer who had to flee after the south collapsed. 



notes so we could flip the location. But the city crew 
had already blocked it off and started construction." 
Other elements of the production were meticulously 



The family relocated to California's Silicon Valley when crafted, including the stunning temple and lotus lake 
Bui was two. He didn't return to his homeland until that serves as the focal point for one story. 



after high school. 



"Ponds, lakes, and flowers are very much a part of 



"I hated the heat, the humidity, everything about Vietnamese culture," says Bui. "But the temple does- 
it," Bui says, wrinkling his nose. "I had never been out n 't really exist. The entire thing was built." Although 
of California, except to Tijuana. After I got back home the art department had planted lotus flowers months 
[from Vietnam], I was so depressed. Three months earlier to allow them time to mature (they bloom red 
later I went back." Bui stayed longer and learned the and turn white), they ran out of time. 



language, which enabled him to talk to people, "a big 
hole" in his first visit. 

During the trip he wrote a short, Yellow Lotus 
(Sundance 1996), that was eventually filmed in 



"We cut off the red blooms and replaced them with 
fakes. That entire lake is white plastic flowers." Bui 
laughs loudly." But the lotus flower close-ups are 
real." But even more important than visual reality was 



Vietnam and starred one of Vietnam's most noted Bui's desire to create an even deeper sense of reality 
actors, Don Duong, who plays a cyclo driver in Three about characters, Vietnamese people long caricatured 



Seasons. After the short's success, Bui was hounded 
by agents and others promising the moon but offering 



in American film. 
"This was not going to be a story about Vietcong 



less." I was getting TV movies of the week, teen angst running through the jungle with guns. It was not going 



films," says Bui, who had other ideas. 



to be about a suave white man sweeping an Asian girl 



"I had been thinking about the stories in Three ff of her feet But those fictional people are based on 

Seasons as separate features," Bui explains. "But I real people I met. They are all worried about being 

realized the voices and points of view were linked. In swep t away, about losing their country. The film had to 

Vietnamese literature and folklore, stories have a do them justice, or I would have I failed." 
thread-like quality. They weave in and out, often into 
other stories. I like to think of Three Seasons as the 



National 
Educational 
Media 
Network 



& 




supporting excellence in 
educational media 

Presents 

Content '99 



13th Annual Media Market 

Conference & Festival 

May 19-22, 1999 

Airport Hilton Hotel 

Oakland, CA 

The Nation's Only Event Exclusively for 
Educational Media Professionals 

Media Market 

May 19-21 

The best, low-cost way to find a 

distributor for works-in-progress or 

finished productions 

Submission Deadlines: 

Early Bird: March 15 

Final: April 27 

Conference 

May 20-21 

Learn the latest trends in production, 

distribution & exhibition 

Early Bird Deadline: April 19 



Apple Awards 
Film & Video Festival 

May 21-22 

A curated selection of Apple Award winners 

at the Oakland Museum of California 



The Media Market was key in securing 

distribution. Meeting so many distributors 

face to face was invaluable. I will definitely 

be back with my next film!" 

Lisa Leeman, Fender Philosophers 



NEMN 

655 Thirteenth St., Suite 100 

Oakland, CA 94612-1220 

PH: 510.465.6885 FX: 510.465.2835 

E-Mail: content@nemn.org 

www.nemn.org 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 13 



AL CIRCUIT 



. course of eight days in the woods, the 
trio becomes increasing cold, hungry, lost, and 
ite, especially as they're terrorized by 
invisible agents each night. It's method acting 
at its most intense. Though placed in the rela- 
tively low-profile Midnight Films category, The 
Blair Witch Project hit a homerun with audi- 
ences and had the honor of being the first 
acquisition of the festival (an Artisan pick-up). 

— PT 

Best Cinematic Revenge: 

Treasure Island 

Once upon a time, films that broke the mold 
were lauded at Sundance. Now distribution 
and marketing executives snicker about them 
in the hallways, as if they don't belong. Such 
was the case this year with Scott King's Treasure 
Island, a tale of two Naval spies set in San 
Francisco during WWII who battle both the 



Film with the Most Pizazz: 

Run, Lola, Run 

Start with a life-or-death plot (something like: 
Lola's boyfriend loses 100,000 Deutche Marks 
from a drug run, and our punk heroine has 20 
minutes to come up with the cash, or he's a 
goner) . Mix in a hefty dose of video game trap- 
pings, add a multiple-choice storyline, stir in an 
up-and-coming actress (Franka Potente), fabu- 
lously inventive editing, a pulsing musical beat, 
and 100 mgs of adrenaline, and you've got Run, 
Lola, Run, by far one of the most original cre- 
ations at the festival. The darling of Toronto 
'98, this German pic by Tom Tykwer also 
became a word of mouth hit in Park City, over- 
coming the indifference that usually greets 
films in the World Cinema category here. — PT 

The Tuva Love Award: 

Throat Singer Kongar-ol Ondar 

The tiny Catholic Church perched 
near the top of Main Street was 
packed. At 8 p.m., all of the pews 
were filled with festival-goers look- 
ing for a good time. They weren't 
there to pray, though, but to listen 
to the star of Genghis Blues, 
Kongar-ol Ondar, one of Tuva's 
best known singers. Tuva, it turns 
out, is a country between Siberia 
and Mongolia — part of the ancient 
Silk Route. And Ondar turned out 



explained every aspect of his traditional Tuvan 
outfit. He and the documentary's makers, Roko 
and Adrian Belie, spent Sundance setting up 
free concerts around town, giving out and soak- 
ing up the good vibes, and picking up an 
Audience Award for their efforts. — CM 

Biggest Hoax: 

Happy, Texas and other "gay" films 

The curious thing about Sundance films 
described as having gay or lesbian "interest" was 
how little they offer the viewers to whom they're 
being marketed. Films that lived up to the 
promise were either foreign, like Simon Shore's 
coming of age tale set in hateful surroundings, 
Get Real, or documentaries, like Thorn 
Fitzgerald's muscle mag expose, Beefcake. 

The impostors: 2 Seconds had exactly that 
much lesbian content; Go.' proves you can claim 
relevance to queers if you lace your flick with 
drug use; The Adventures of Sebastian Cole is a 
thoroughly reprehensible affair whose creators 
(like their protagonist) confuse deciding to 
change your gender with deciding to become a 
drag queen (and a straight one at that) . 

The worst "how to make queers spend 




Japanese and their own 
psycho-sexual demons. 
The film is a stylish 
combination of spy flick, 
propaganda newsreel, 
and forties romance. Its 
gray-toned cinematog- 
raphy wasn't the only 
thing that freaked the 
suits: King deftly weaves 
a critique of class and 
race relations into his 
story, with results that 
make you squirm even if you don't immediate- 
ly realize you're doing so. In spite of the snick- 
ering, King was awarded a Special Jury Prize for 
Distinctive Vision in Filmmaking, a much- 
deserved tribute to a director with the guts to 
make such a personal creation. — MH 



to be an outstanding ambassador. A kind of 
James Taylor of the Mongolian steppes, Ondar 
specializes in throat singing, an ancient Tuvan 
singing tradition where the singer can produce 
several notes simultaneously. A true performer, 
his concert was funny and moving — even when 
he went anthropological on the audience and 



money to see a straight flick" offender is 
Happy, Texas. This ditty gives two straight 
guys a change to play gay (which somehow 
helps them bed girls) without experiencing 
a hint of homophobia or ridicule. 
Suspension of disbelief failed me entirely. 
This is Texas, a state ruled by the nation's 
oldest sodomy law, the Bush family, and the 
Second Amendment: for queers, there's nothing 
happy about it. The only actual gay character is 
a sheriff played to the nines (but without pumps, 
thank goodness) by William H. Macy. The 
unhappy math: Three gay characters (two of 
whom are bookend-style plot devices) plus 
dozens and dozens of straight characters, plus 



14 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



THE OFFICIAL 1999 



SUNDANCE AWARDS 



GRAND JURY PRIZES 

DRAMATIC: THREE SEASONS (Tony Bui) 

DOCUMENTARY: AMERICAN MOVIE 

(Chris Smith & Sarah Price) 

AUDIENCE AWARDS 

DRAMATIC: THREE SEASONS (Tony Bui) 

DOCUMENTARY GENGHIS BLUES (Roko Belie) 

WORLD CINEMA: RUN, LOLA, RUN (Tom Tywker, Germany) 

TRAIN OF LIFE (Radu Mihaileanu, France) 

FILMMAKERS TROPHY 

DRAMATIC: TUMBLEWEEDS (Gavin O'Connor) 

DOCUMENTARY: SING FASTER: THE STAGEHANDS' RING 

CYCLE (Jon Else) 

DIRECTING AWARD 

DRAMATIC: JUDY BERLIN (Eric Mendelsohn) 
DOCUMENTARY: REGRET TO INFORM (Barbara Sonneborn) 

CINEMATOGRAPHY AWARD 

DRAMATIC: THREE SEASONS, photographed by Lisa Rinzler 

DOCUMENTARY RABBIT IN THE MOON & REGRET TO 

INFORM, photographed by Emiko Omori 

FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION AWARD 

DOCUMENTARY: THE BLACK PRESS: SOLDIERS WITHOUT 
SWORDS (Stanley Nelson) 

WALDO SALT SCREENWRITING AWARD 

GUINEVERE, written by Audrey Wells 
JOE THE KING, written by Frank Whaley 

JURY PRIZE in SHORT FILMMAKING 

MORE, Mark Osborne 

JURY PRIZE in LATIN AMERICAN CINEMA 

SANTITOS, Alejandro Springall 

SPECIAL JURY PRIZE for COMEDIC PERFORMANCE 

HAPPY, TEXAS, Steve Zahn 

SPECIAL JURY PRIZE for 
DISTINCTIVE VISION IN FILMMAKING 

TREASURE ISLAND, Scott King 

SPECIAL JURY PRIZE for DOCUMENTARY 

ON THE ROPES, Brett Morgen & Nanette Burstein 

SPECIAL JURY AWARD in SHORT FILMMAKING 

FISHBELLY WHITE, Michael Burke 



SPECIAL JURY AWARD in LATIN AMERICAN CINEMA 

LIFE IS TO WHISTLE, Fernando Perez 



DIGIT 
2 


SPLASH 

STUDIOS 
1 (jft& *b 


POST 
47 


A L AUDIO 
1 2 • 27 1 • 87 


DIALOG, FX EDITING ADR & FOLEY RECORDING 

168 5th Ave. ,5th floor N.W. New York N.Y. 10010 
Fax: (212) 271- 8748 e-mail: bplprod@aol.com 



AVJT? PWCES 
KUUNG YOU? 

Come to RADICAL AVID for 
the LOWEST PRICES in New York! 

RAjUAM^AVID 




1133 Broadway at 26th Street 
(212) 633-7497 



All Systems MC 7.0 PCI 
Off Line/On Line /AVR 77 



Spacious 24 Hr. Editing Suites 

• Dubs to and from DV, miniDV, Beta, 3/4, VHS w/tc windows 

• Highest Quality COMPONENT In/Output DV and miniDV 

• Batch digitize directly from DV and miniDV 

No More Beta Bump-Ups! 



DV • miniDV • DV • miniDV • DV • miniDV • DV 




April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 15 



:-jM 



?gr 



i\ romance, plus three real straight 

plus two scenes of heterosexual 

urse, plus no gay sex. What does it 

C )ne major misleading marketing cam- 

— MH 

Documentary Hot Spot: 

San Francisco 

The Bay Area created tremors of its 
own this year at Sundance, with 
four of seven top documentary 
awards going to projects from the 
area. Taking Best Director was 
Barbara Sonnenborn's Regret to 
Inform; the Belie brothers locked up 
the Audience Award for Genghis 
Blues; Best Cinematography went to 
Emiko Omori who co-shot both her 
own film, Rabbit in the Moon, about 
the Japanese internment camps, as 
well as Regret to Inform; and Jon 
Else's engaging saga, Sing Faster: 
The Stagehands' Ring Cycle, won the 
Filmmakers Trophy. Three of these films were 
sponsored by Films Arts Foundation. FAF 
director Gail Silva explains that "There has 
always been a long tradition of social issue doc- 
umentary in the Bay Area. It's part of the lega- 
cy of the social movements of the sixties and 
seventies." Their influence reaches far beyond 
Sundance. FAF itself has sponsored 14 docu- 
mentaries nominated for the Oscar, and two 
that have won. This year's Regret to Inform is 
following in that tradition and may bring yet 
another statue to the Bay Area. — CM 

Best Adaptation of a Novel: 

The War Zone 

Based on the highly-acclaimed novel The War 
Zone by Alexander Stuart, actor and first-time 
director Tim Roth does an outstanding job of 
addressing the complex and painful topic of 
sexual abuse in the family. Roth also succeeds 
in keeping alive the true essence of the novel 
throughout the film — there is almost a sense 
here of pages being turned as the viewer is pro- 
pelled deeper and deeper into the story — yet 
the cinematic feel is equally compelling. Roth 
manages to create a crushingly claustrophobic 
environment for his characters, including two 
of the best debut performances in memory 
(from total newcomers Lara Belmont and 
Freddie Cunliffe). The exterior shots, set in the 
cliffs of southwest England, give a hint as what 
it must be like to stand on the edge of the world 
in total isolation, making Happiness look like 
The Brady Bunch. — RB 



Best Promotional Enticement: 

On the Ropes 

Hang up those tired baseball caps. A documen- 
tary on boxing calls for other promotional 
hooks. And so, On the Ropes' codirectors 
Nanette Burstein and Brett Morgen came up 
with a unique offer for acquisitions staffers: a 
free training session with Harry Keitt, the box- 



Boxer George Walton 
fights his way through 
On the Ropes. 




ing coach at the Brooklyn gym that is featured 
in their documentary. "We figured if there was 
a bidding war, they could duke it out," quips 
Morgen. Burstein had firsthand knowledge of 
the treat they were offering, having trained 
with Keitt for a year before beginning the film. 
(Weighing in at 103 pounds, the itsy-bitsy 
director is classified as a "flyweight.") But so far, 
only one acquisitions person has taken them up 
on it: Miramax's Elizabeth Dreyer. No doubt 
she's looking to learn a knockout punch. 

— PT 

Strangest Press Conference: 

Stan Brakhage's Video Address at 
Lapdance 

Video depositions seem to be growing in popu- 
larity these days, so it seemed somewhat suiting 
that legendary experimental filmmaker Stan 
Brakhage follow in the President's footsteps. 
Though he was supposed to be the (live) guest 
of honor at Lapdance, a one-night film festi- 
val/nose -thumbing-at-Sundance that was 
spearheaded by Certified Renegade American 
Products (CRAP) and South Park boys Matt 
Stone and Trey Parker, Brakhage opted instead 
to make a virtual appearance. "My dream is 
that somebody will hire me to play a little bit 
part or a little cameo role in some movie to 
flesh out my otherwise pathetic salary at the 
University of Colorado, so that I can survive 
and raise my kids and go on with my work," 
said the avant-garde auteur's avatar. 
"Otherwise I'm completely content with the 



world." With the Starlet Express parked outside 
(a tour bus for adult video stars), strippers 
prancing about in the background, and French 
TV news cameras falling all over each other for 
a close-up of bare buns, this was hands down 
the most bizarre press conference in Park City. 

— RB 

Worst Technical Nightmare 

American Movie Screening from Hell 

Tuesday, January 26, began innocently enough: 
A Sundance morn like any other. But that day, 
three patrons attending a screening of Chris 
Smith's American Movie were injured by a piece 
of ventilation duct that fell from a wall above 
their seats. Two were treated and released; one 
was removed by paramedics on a stretcher and 
taken to a clinic, from which he was released 
later that evening. An hour into the American 
Movie screening, the sound was garbled for 
nearly 15 minutes. After that was sorted out, 
the bulb burned through the print. All tell the 
same tale, however: Director Chris Smith and 
the audience were valiant to the end. So were 
members of the Documentary Jury attending 
that screening: American Movie won the Grand 
Jury Prize and was picked up by Sony. — MH 

Most Unique Screening: 

Nusrat: A Voice from Heaven 

For days before the world premiere of Nusrat at 
Slamdance, a mini-van full of Pakistanis slowly 
cruised Park City's Main Street, blasting the 
Quawwali music of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. 
Rather than attempting to start a new lowrider 
trend in Utah, however, they were generating 
publicity for this wonderfully compelling docu- 
mentary on the life of this great (and recently 
deceased) Sufi vocalist. The screening was no 
less interesting, with Persian tapestries adorning 
the walls and rugs on the floor sprinkled with 
rose petals, while the smell of incense lingered 
sweetly in the air, as director Guiseppe Asaro 
showed Nusrat: A Voice from Heaven as a work- 
in-progress. When the makeshift screen went 
down afterward, a stage was prepared for a spe- 
cial performance by Nusrat's nephew Rahat Ali 
Khan, who was accompanied by a full band, 
including many of Nusrat's original players. 
They had made the journey to Park City from 
Pakistan at their own expense just for this occa- 
sion, and it was by far one of the most uplifting 
moments of the festival. — RB 

Richard Baimbndge, Mark ]. Huisman, and Cara 

Mertes are contributing editors to The Independent; 

Patricia Thomson is editor in chief. 



16 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 




tHe A^ 
nf rEnTiNg. 



■ ■ ■ ■ 

IMJJLkJ>^ 

■ ■■ 



AVID RENTALS 



MC 8000-1000-400 

PRO-TOOLS 

DVC PRO-DECK 



EXCELLENT TECH SUPPORT 



m 

(productions) 

212.741.9155 




1-800-949-2089 or 1-508-866-2199 

or reach us on the internet at www.glidecam.com 



Glidecam is Registered at the Patent and TM Office 



access to emerging tal 





^^ Gen Art 
film festival 

new york city 
april 28-may k 
^rating the works of 
emerging American filmmaker: 

for tJcL 



IVAL CIRCUIT 



MAY I HAVE THIS DANCE? 

Things to Know about Slamdance 




mmediately after getting 

ifth annual Slamdance Film 

ir web site (www.slamdance. 

s out. I read about a feature 

14 Ways to Wear Lipstick, 

r, Daniel Pace, smuggled a 

i camera into the U.S. in 

no.) This was my kind of 



festival. 



The odds: Slamdance got 1,716 submissions, 
and accepted 14 features and 17 shorts in com- 
petition (1.8%). Sundance had approximately 
3,000 submissions, and accepted 80 features 
and 53 shorts (4%). Compare the numbers to 
Harvard (10%) or Stanford (16%). 

The history: The festival started when a bunch 
of guys got rejected from Sundance and started 
their own screenings. Co-founder Dan Mirvish 
admits, "It started as a very selfish act, but then 
we realized we could do it for other people." 
When asked if Slamdance is a copy-cat leech- 
ing off of the luster of Sundance, Mirvish says, 
"Of course! When Robert Redford called us a 
parasite on the Sundance festival, it was some 
of the best press we ever got. The following 
year, Redford added 'Well, there are good para- 
sites and bad parasites.' " 

The setup: The main operations take place in 
the Treasure Mountain Inn at the top of Main 
Street in Park City, less than half a block from 
the Egyptian Theater used by Sundance. The 
inn's lobby is constantly buzzing with activity, 
with twenty-something hipsters mingling, buy- 
ing tickets and Slamdance paraphernalia, and 
listening for buzz. 

Next to the lobby is the competition screen- 
ing room — a converted hotel conference room 
with 136 folding chairs and cushions on the 
floor. All competition screenings include a 
short film and a feature. Down the hall is the 
Filmmakers Lounge, a room full of armchairs, 
couches, and a giant 6' x 8' screen projecting a 
roaring fire. People can come and go from the 
lounge at all hours, catching readings from 
screenplays, fireside chats about the industry, 
short film programs, and skiers wandering in to 
get warm. 



Imitation and flattery in 
Jordan Brady's Dill 
Scallion. 



ed road documentary; and finally, Mike 
Mitchell's Herd, a short film that won the Spirit 
of Slamdance award, about how an alien 
changes the life of a lonely fry cook. 

Special mention to Casey Steele and Elizabeth 
Rovnick for their work on the Slamdance festi- 
val trailer. The jazzed up, buzzed out 30 seconds 
felt like every frame was cut up in pieces and 
put back together by hand. It brought the 
house down every time. 

The parties: In the past, Slamdancers were 
always trying to sneak into the Sundance par- 
ties. This has not changed, because there are 
more celebrities there. However, this year's 
Slamdance had at least a dozen parties of its 
own that kept people standing outside all night 
in the cold, which is, of course, the goal. 

Celebrity sightings: Janeane Garofalo, Henry 
Winkler, Sheryl Crow, Allison Anders, Carl 
Lewis, Kathy Griffin, Perry Farrell, Tim Roth, 
Steve Zahn, Ken Kesey, Guns and Roses, 
Stewart Copeland, Rae Dawn Chong, Illeana 
Douglas, Rosanna Arquette . . . 




The features: All the features 
had an edgy vibe. Chi Girl, a 
stalkumentery made by Heidi 
Van Lier with one other crew 
member and completed for less 
than $50,000 (borrowed from 
her mom), won the Grand Jury 
Award for best feature. Man of 
the Century, the Audience 
Award winner for best feature, is a comedy 
about a sharp-witted fast-talking young jour- 
nalist living in modern day Manhattan who's 
convinced he's living in the 1920s. Following, by 
Christopher Nolan, is a taut, stylish thriller and 
won the Ilford black-and-white award and dis- 
tribution with Zeitgeist. The movie was shot on 
location in London on Saturdays for almost a 
year. Jordan Brady's Dill Scallion, a country 
send-up of Spinal Tap, was another audience 
favorite playing to jam-packed crowds. Leann 
Rimes was on hand to sing "Amazing Grace" 
after the screening. 

The shorts: Standout shorts included Billy's 
Balloon, by Don Hertzfeldt, an animation about 
a boy and a balloon that beats him senseless; 
Plug, Meher Gourjian's exploration of virtual 
reality with digital animation; Roadhead, Bob 
Sabiston and Tommy Pallotta's oddball animat- 



The awards: Every winner gets a small but glo- 
rious bronze statuette of a grinning dog — com- 
plete with dog tag. It's called "The Sparky." 

Life after Slamdance: In this year's program 

catalog, director Kevin DiNovis writes, "About 

a month after my film Surrender Dorothy won 

the jury prize at last year's Slamdance, I had 

lunch with this big agent in Beverly Hills. 'I 

didn't see your movie,' he told me, 'but I loved 

the reviews. I want to be in the Kevin DiNovis 

business.' My heart sank. I had been in the 

Kevin DiNovis business all my life, and I was 

dying to get out . . . Better luck to the class of 

'99." 

Jay Lowi 

}ay Lowi is a member of the class of '99. His 12 
Stops on the Road to Nowhere won the 
Audience Award for Best Short Film at this year's 
Slamdance. 



18 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



M 



212*252*3522 



Media Composers 

• Film Negative Matchback 

• AVR77 

• 3D-DVE effects 

• 92 GIGS storage 

• Protools sound mix 
Transfers / Duplication 
Camera Pkgs / Animation 
Graphics / AVID Classes 





c&s 


International Insurance Brokers Inc 

Discounted 

Liability 

Insurance 

for 
AIVF Members 

Suite 500 

20 Vesey Street 

New York City,NY 

10007-2966 

Tel: 800-257-0883 

212-406-4499 

Fax:212-406-7588 

E-Mail: staff@csins.com 

http://www.csins.com 





P1LM SCFiiiL 



with Dov S-S Simens 




Learn to 
Produce, 
Direct and 
Distribute a 
Feature Film 
in one 
weekend! 



LOS ANGELES 

Apr 24-25, May 23-24 or Jun 26-27 

WORLD TOUR 

GHANA: Apr 17-18 

DENVER: May 15-16 

WASHINGTON, DC: May 29-30 

NEW YORK: Jun 5-6 

SAN FRANCISCO: lun 19-20 



Learn at Home! 
Audio Film School™ Available 




http://HollywoodU.com 

HFI, Inc., P0 Box 481252, LA, CA 90048 



either only 

$289 



HOLLYWOOD 



800-366-3456 



m 



INSTITUTE 




CALL FOR ENTRIES 



— ' — ' 






! ■ .'■-.■:- ,,!'■' ,-.. ,!-. 



New Filmmakers Forum Compe 

Opening Weekend, October 29-31 
First or second-time directors only 



Features and Shorts, narrative and non-narrative 
35mm or 16mm formats only 
Entry Fees: $25 Features, $15 Shorts 



Submission Dates 
May 1- August 20, 1999 



Prizes 



2 



Emerging Filmmaker Award (features), the Best Short Award, plus 

other awards 

Cash awards, industry goods and services, plus one-week St. Louis 

theatrical run 

Finalists of competitive feature films attend the New Filmmakers 

Forum Weekend as guests 



New Filmmakers Forum Weekend Includes 



Competitive Screenings/Q&A's 

Seminars/Workshops 

Demonstrations 

Informal Coffees /Networking Parties with filmmakers 



Contact ) 

Saint Louis 
International 
Film Festival 

55 Maryland Plaza, 

Suite A 

St. Louis, Missouri 

63108-1501 

USA 

Phone: 314-454-0042 
Fax: 314-454-0540 

E-mail: info@sliff.org 
Website: www.sliff.org 



Festival Dates 



Oct 29-Nov 7, 1999 





SAINT LOUIS 

INTERNATIONAL 

FILM 

FESTIVAL 



estival Featured 



•We are a facility specializing in 
picture and audio post for projects 
finished on film. We offer full audio 

services; sound design, foley, ADR 
and mixing. Film editing at 24 or 30 

fps on high end digital non linear 
systems and full technical support at 

every stage of your project Please 

contact us for more information. 




MERCER STREET 



s 



DIGITAL AUDIO 
- PRODUCTION - 

for Film and Video 
and Multimedia 



Pro Xools 
Media lOO 

Sound Design • Original Music • Sound Effects 

Voice Over and ADR • Sound Editing and Mixing 

Non Linear Video Editing • Multimedia and Internet 

Alan Berliner • Lisa Lewenz • Jem Cohen • Cathy Cook 
Maria Venuto • Shelley Silver • Brett Morgen • Tony Oursler 
Peggy Ahwesh • Kathy High • Ellen Spiro • Lewis Klahr 
Ardele Lister • Hillary Brougher • Adam Cohen • Greg Bordowitz 

Discount Rates for Independents 



76 MERCER ST. NYC 10012 • 212.966-6794 • E-mailmercerst@aol.com 




Thff ROBERT 

FLAHERTY 



International Film Seminars 

in association with the Program in Film and Video and 

the Center for International Studies at Duke University 

presents 

OUT-TAKES ARE 
HISTORY 

The 45th Robert Flaherty 
Film Seminar 

Programmed by 
Richard Herskowitz and Orlando Bagwell 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 

Durham, North Carolina 
Friday, June 4 - Thursday, June 1 0, 1 999 




INTERNATIONAL FILM SEMINARS, INC. 

462 Broadway. Suite 510 • New York, NY 10013 

voice: 212.925.3191 • fax: 212.925.3482 • email: ifsnyc@aol.com 

www.flahertyseminar.org 



A Veteran's Tale 

hooting to Kill: How an Independent 
Producer Blasts through the Barriers 
to Make Movies that Matter 
by Christine Vac/ion, with David 
Edehtein; Avon Books, New York, 
1998; 335 pp, softcover $12 



5 

Christine Vachon has created a 

highly readable, informative, and insightful 
book. Combing through 
her experience producing 
such notable indie films 
as Todd Haynes' Poison 
and Safe, Tom Kalin's 
Swoon, and Larry Clark's 
Kids, Vachon has pulled 
together (with the assis- 
tance of veteran film crit- 
ic David Edelstein) a con- 
cise yet comprehensive 
overview of the low-bud- 
get producing process. 
The book includes sepa- 
rate chapters on script 
development, budgeting 
(including mock budgets 
for films at various lev- 
els), financing, prepro- 
duction, principal pho- 
tography, and postproduction, as well as mar- 
keting and distribution. 

Rather than use theoretical terms, Vachon 
illustrates her points with examples from her 
producing career. We are privy to the evolution 
of scripts for Swoon and I Shot Andy Warhol, as 
well as Vachon's dealings with the Screen 
Actors Guild on Kids, the casting of Velvet 
Goldmine and Kids, shooting in earthquake - 
shaken California during Safe; and doing the 
distributor dance on I Shot Andy Warhol. Unlike 
other authors of film production books, Vachon 
avoids telling "war stories" just to show how she 
overcame adversity and instead illustrates how 
other filmmakers can deal with such difficulties. 

Diary interludes from Vachon's journals are 
interspersed throughout the book, enabling 
readers to see the producer's mindset during 
the different stages of filmmaking: trou- 
bleshooting on the I Shot Andy Warhol shoot, 
enduring postproduction hell on Velvet 
Goldmine; and playing the festival game when 
Safe and Kids had their 1995 premieres at 
Sundance and Cannes. 




According to 
Vachon, 

"Low-budget 
filmmaking is 
like childbirth. 

You have to 

repress the 
horror or you'll 

never do it 
again." 



Vachon discusses films at differing budget 
levels, including Poison ($250,000), Kiss Me, 
Gvtido ($800,000), and Happiness ($2.5 mil- 
lion). She proves that in independent film "low 
budget" is a matter of perspective and more 
money does not lead to fewer problems (often 
the reverse is true). 

As well as interweaving anecdote and infor- 
mation, Vachon provides a forum for other 
voices from the indie film community. Mark 
Tusk (Miramax), Marcus Hu (Strand Relea- 
ing), and David Linde (Good Machine) discuss 
marketing and distribution; Velvet 
Goldmine editor James Lyons describes 
how editing can make or break an inde- 
pendent film; and Good Machine co- 
founders Ted Hope and James Schamus 
outline the role of the producer and the 
future of the industry. 

Shooting to Kill is more than just a no- 
nonsense guide to independent film- 
making or a compendium of insightful 
yet dourly entertaining anecdotes 
about some of the most respected inde- 
pendent films of the past decade. The 
book provides a clear yet comprehen- 
sive answer to that inevitable question: 
"What does a producer do?" According 
to Vachon, "Low-budget filmmaking is 
like childbirth. You have to repress the 
horror or you'll never do it again." 
Through her example, Vachon has 
shown how the good producer can do it, again 
and again. 

Robert L. Seigel 

Robert L. Seigel [Rlsentlaw@aol.com] is a New 

York entertainment attorney and a principal in the 

Cinema Film Consulting firm. 



The Bible, Updated 

The Filmmaker's Handbook: 

A Comprehensive Guide for the Digital Age 

by Steven Ascher & Edward Pincus; Plume 
(Penguin Putnam), New York 1999; 614 pp, soft- 
cover, $18.95 

The Filmmaker's Handbook was first pub- 
lished in 1984 and has been a production bible 
ever since. But now that technology has forev- 
er changed the way films are made, and docu- 
mentary filmmakers Edward Pincus (Black 
Natchez; Diaries: 1971-76) and Steven Ascher 
(Troublesome Creek: A Midwestern) have taken 
up the challenge of revising and updating their 



original, so as to render it is as relevant today as 
it was 1 5 years ago. As the title of this second 
edition suggests, much of what has changed in 
filmmaking is attributable to digital technology, 
and the bulk of the revisions and additions pre- 
sumably apply to the chapters devoted to video 
production and nonlinear editing. The rest of 
the 600-plus pages, however, are devoted to the 
film in filmmaking and provide an invaluable 
course in both technology and technique. 

Starting with the most fundamental func- 
tions of the camera, The Filmmaker's Handbook 
outlines the processes that create both film and 
video images and guides the reader through 
every stage of production — from assembling a 




crew to delivering a print or broadcast master. 
Encyclopedic in scope, the book breaks every 
subject down to its component elements, 
resulting in a reference work for students and 
working filmmakers alike. It may not make for 
compelling bedtime reading, but The Film- 
maker's Handbook is a great tome to have handy 
when you have a crucial, specific question: 
What film stock reacts best to forced process- 
ing? How does an A/D converter work? Can a 
DAW reconstruct online audio tracks using an 
OMF file and my masters? 

Although the word "digital" is on the cover, 
it's important to note that The Filmmaker's 
Handbook is not a production guide specifically 
tailored to the digital filmmaker; rather, it's a 
careful rewrite of a filmmaking resource that 
brings the original (and the reader) up to date. 
But as independent filmmakers often wear 
many hats (say, producing, shooting, and edit- 
ing their own project), The Fihnmaker's 
Handbook is a valuable tool that can prepare 
them for the problems and challenges unique to 
every stage of production — digital or analog. 

Ryan Deussing 

Ryan Deussing is a filmmaker and former 
managing editor of The Independent. 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 21 




Digital Preproduction 

Digital still cameras make their mark on 
storyboarding and location scouting. 



by Rob Rown d 



The new breed: 

Nikon's Coolpix 

900 offers 

1280x960 

resolution 

and lists 

for $799. 




VERYBODY KNOWS THAT OLD ALFRED 
Hitchcock chestnut about produc- 
tion being boring because all the 
decisions were made during prepro- 
duction. Everybody also knows that 
late-night jittery third pot of coffee 
moment when you look at those 
nasty little ballpoint thumbnails 
you're struggling to turn into story- 
boards and just want to cry out of 
frustration. The 
tension between 
the glorious cinemascope 
Dolby vision in your head 
and the pale imitation in 
your notebook is familiar ter- 
ritory to all of us. 

Unless you're a micro - 
budget maverick director like 
Jon Jost and able to get by 
with a guerrilla crew of three, 
or a TV commercial or epi- 
sodic director coming to that 
first feature with years of on- 
set experience, that private 
tension also has a very public 
side. Directing independent (and therefore 
low-budget) work puts you in a position of try- 
ing to make the vision in your head as clear as 
possible to department heads who usually only 
have the time and resources to take one shot at 
expressing that vision via lenses, dolly track, 
props, and set decoration. 

Film directing is always a cross between a 
team sport and that freshman-year acting exer- 
cise where you fall backwards off a table and 
pray that six people you've just met will catch 
you before you hit the floor. True, you're the 
captain, but once you're in mid-air, that's not 
really all that important. In a very real sense, 
preproduction is the last chance to look over 
your shoulder and plan how to fall before mak- 
ing that leap of faith. It's also about making 
sure everyone is aware of where you want to go 



and can help you land with some degree of 
grace. 

For this chapter on digital filmmaking, we go 
back to the point where the words begin to 
leave the page and get turned into images. 
Since working independently means using your 
resources efficiently, the methods described 
below are designed to use as few pieces of soft- 
ware and hardware as possible. 



independent film, I was once given a non-scale 
picture of a farmhouse drawn with a ball point 
on a bar napkin and told to be ready for a night 
exterior tomorrow. I don't think that particular 
Artist Formerly Known as Location Manager 
gets a whole lot of work anymore, but you get 
my point. The flow of information between 
departments can be pretty haphazard. 

Under the old studio system there was an 




Digital/Photochemical Briccolage 
By any means . . . 

The personal computer began to change the 
way we manipulate, process, and digest words 
and numbers 15 years ago. It has completely 
changed the way film and tape are edited. 
Today the off-line aspects of postproduction are 
handled on a tape-based system or flatbed as 
infrequently as the first draft of a screenplay is 
written on a legal pad with a #2 pencil. 

But for a variety of reasons, the computer 
revolution leap-frogged over the visual side of 
preproduction and most of production itself. 
Aside from CAD programs for set design, com- 
puters haven't begun to be truly integrated into 
the visualization process. Instead we have loca- 
tion stills, ball point drawing, Post-It notes, and 
lots of tracing paper. Working as a gaffer on an 



entire division of storyboard artists and produc- 
tion illustrators charged with rendering the 
look, mood, and feel of each shot in paper, ink, 
and charcoal. They still work in large-budget 
projects today, especially in television commer- 
cials, because spots have to go through such an 
extended approval process that it is vital every- 
body who can say no — and there are a lot of 
them — completely understands the project 
before production begins. With all the cards on 
the table beforehand and a creative team will- 
ing to stick to the original concept, these com- 
mercial productions move faster and more effi- 
ciently than any independent production I've 
ever seen. 

Unfortunately, it's still a bit early to be look- 
ing for new digital tools to aid in the visualiza- 
tion and communication process of preproduc- 



22 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



don. While there are software programs and 
cameras available that enable you stay com- 
pletely within the digital realm while planning 
shots and sequences, they are still a little too 
basic to allow for much flexibility. Since prepro 
duction is about making up your mind — and 
then changing it — it is important to have as 
much room to manipulate and cajole images as 
possible. 

Unhappy with the ready-made software 
packages, I took a step backwards technologi- 
cally and explored ways to use several standard 
editing and image manipulation programs and 
good old-fashioned 400 ASA print film to pre- 
determine the final look of a film. 

Digital Still Cameras 

Every major 35mm still camera manufacturer 
and most camcorder manufacturers now make 
two varieties of digital still cameras. All of the 
lenses are mediocre at best. For $200-400 you 
can buy a camera that captures a low-res image 



program — no developing or printing costs. 
Cameras at both price ranges deliver full- 
screen image qualities that are good enough to 
pick locations and decide what props and set 
dressing to use that will turn that catering 
office in an industrial neighborhood into a chic 
downtown boutique. 

All of this can be done very easily in Adobe 
Photoshop. You start with the location photo as 
a background and then import digital cut-outs 
of the set dressing, props, and additional con- 
struction as individual channels on top of it. 
You can then electronically erase and clean up 
the image and have a pretty good idea of your 
new background. Shoot enough coverage of 
the set from a variety of angles, and you'll be 
able to experiment with different versions of 
the location without leaving the house. 



Ways of Seeing 




Storyboarding is another area that invites digi- 
tal images. But it's here that the weaknesses of 

digital acquisi- 
tion are exposed, 
especially when 
compared to 
good old-fash- 
ioned drugstore - 
processed glossy 
prints scanned 
into the comput- 



The limitations 

of digital pix: 

A view of what 

happens when a 

digital photo 

with a locked 

number of pixels 

is enlarged. 






(640 x 480 pixels) that 
will never be mistaken for 
an average Instamatic 
snapshot. For $350-800 
you can double the num- 
ber of pixels recorded and 
get a decent image, but it 
still looks slightly off 
when compared to an 
image originating on neg- 
ative film. 

After the initial pur- 
chase, digital still cam- 
eras are cheap to use 
because they record the picture information 
directly to disc, which can then be hosed into a 
PC. Once inside the PC, the photos can be 
used as JPEG or PICT files in any image-editing 



Since preproduction is 

about making up your 



The number of 
pixels in images 
shot with digital 
still cameras is 
fixed when the 
image is record- 
ed. This is not a 
problem when working 
with either the entire 
image or cropping that 
image to use a detail at 
its original size. The 
images are better than 
stills taken from video- 
tape, but not as sharp as 
scanned 35mm prints. 
They are usable, but 
not inspiring. ' 
However, when you 
radically change your 
mind about a camera 
position or lens choice — and you will — but 
don't have time to go back and shoot another 
set of photos, the fixed number of pixels limits 
the degree to which you can blow up a detail to 



changing it— it is \ 

important to have 

as much room to 

manipulate and cajole 

images as possible. 



Avid Non-Linear Editing, available in 
both PAL & NTSC for: 
Short Films/Documentaries/ 
Music Videos & Commercials 
Demo Reels 

Post Production 



Video Tape Transfers in all formats , 
including: DV Cam & DVC Pro 

■ International Standards Conversion, 
PAL & SECAM 

High Quality Duplication from any 
Source Master 
Film to tape Transfer 




ANALOG DIGITAL INTERNATIONAL 

20 East 49th Street, 2nd floor 

New York, NY 10017 

Tel: (21 2) 688-51 1 Fax (21 2) 688-5405 

E-MAIL address: adidigital@aol.com 




ENTRY 

(Fees, that is) 

WYBE Public Television in Philadelphia 
seeks works up to 56 minutes for 
THROUGH THE LENS, an award-winning 
weekly series showcasing innovative film 
and video from around the world. 

NO ENTRY FEE 

ACQUISITION FEE: $25 PER MINUTE 

ALL STYLES AND GENRES 
WELCOME 



Submission deadline April 20, 1 999 



For an application: 




WYBE Public Television 
attn: Carl Lee, TTL 
6070 Ridge Avenue 
Philadelphia PA 19128 
(215)483-3900 

email: ttl@wybe.pbs.org 



or visit www.wybe.org and follow the links 
to a printable application. 

we'll take you there 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 23 



TECHKTOLOGT 



/ 



AVID rental 

large rooms 

with a view 

in mid-town 

24 hr building 



AVID 1000/AVR77 
AVID 800 Film Composer 



X 



/ 



X 



As long-time 

AIUF members 

our goal is to help 

other independent 

^Producers and editors j> 

Our rates are 
competitive 



DIVA Edit 

1 -800-324-AVID 

V 330 W 42nd St NYC /> 





Sf (out 2 1st fir » Hum 903 • Ny. NY 100 10 

2f2®367®3730 

viceroyfilmc ■.'mind spring, com 



full-screen size. Open any picture file in 
Photoshop, hit Command + a few times, and 
you'll see what I mean (see photos on pages 22- 
23). The image becomes progressively more 
blocky as it expands. Combine several such 
images and you create a storyboard that is as 
confusing as a bad ballpoint sketch. Since the 
point of this whole exercise is to make better, 
more readable storyboards, there has to be a 
better way. 

One solution is to shoot 35mm stills at the 
location and then scan them into the PC with 
a bargain basement flatbed scanner. A 300 x 
600 dots per inch (dpi) scanner runs at about 
$100. It is considered a home office item not 
suitable for serious graphic work, and its resolu- 
tion power is actually less that the cheaper dig- 
ital cameras. However, even working with tast 
film, average exposures, and drugstore process- 
ing, this method still produces scanned images 
that have a better tonal range and more detail 
than the expensive digital camera. When 
forced to use available (in this case meaning 
bad) light, the visual difference between the 
two becomes even more extreme. 



Ways of Cheating 



Images made with a digital still camera are 
locked into the resolution of the capture. 
Scanning a photo chemical print makes it easi- 
er to selectively crop and re-crop images down 
to their most useful size. 

The trick with scanning is to over-sample 
the number of pixels in the print. You'll be 
working with factors of 72, which is the dpi of 
every computer screen. For example, scanning 
a print at 144 dpi (double the screen's limita- 
tion) or 288 dpi (quadruple the screen'* limita- 
tion) produces a file with two or four times the 
detail of that file's on-screen representation. 

This comes in handy when you want to blow 
up a detail. Since the computer cannot exceed 
the 72 dpi limitation and because it must 
adhere to the number of pixels per inch 
assigned to the file during the scan, it simply 
displays every pixel in the grid that makes up 
the image as if it were a 72 dpi file. The end 
result of the intersection of these two limita- 
tions is that over-sampling the scan rate leads 
to a very large screen display of that file. For 
example, if a 17" monitor is set to 1280 x 960 
pixel resolution, a 640 x 480 file will fill half the 
screen and a 1280 x 960 version of the same file 
will fill the entire screen. Correspondingly, the 
people, props, and set dressing in the second 
scan will be twice as large as those in the first, 



but without the blockiness you find when you 
expand a 640 x 480 file to twice its original 
screen size. 

Ways of Distributing 

Once you have set your storyboards — and 
spent another week fiddling with them — you 
can import them as JPEG or PICT files into an 
MS Word or Wordperfect version of the script. 
This can be opened on any PC (Mac or 
Wintell) as a document that resembles a comic 
book or photo novel. Since nearly everybody 
who works in film owns a computer with one or 
the other word-processing program, this is usu- 
ally an adequate first step, and it will save a few 
trees. 

However, if you want to print them out, this 
will take some more finagling, since we've 
taken the file resolutions to lower levels than 
are usually applied to printed materials. Of 
course you can redigitize all of the picture ele- 
ments at a higher resolution, recreate all the 
photoboards, then re-import them into the 
script. Or, more simply, you can take screen 
shots of each page of the script [hit Command, 
Shift, and 3 on a Mac or Control, Shift, and 3 
on its slightly less clever clone from Redmond, 
Washington] and then trim and print those 
files from either Photoshop or Adobe 
Illustrator. 

It's important to remember that the comput- 
er thinks of screen shots as apicture of the script 
and photoboards rather than a word processing 
document. True, it has text, but it cannot be 
altered. Think of this last step as a photocopy, 
and you'll understand its limitations. 

Ways of Concluding 

Digital preproduction provides a way to bring 
some of the best elements of the old studio sys- 
tem and current high-end commercial produc- 
tion system to the indie game. Planning and 
thinking aren't free, but they are easily the most 
cost-effective part of the filmmaking process. 
Every independent project I've worked on 
could have benefited from a clearer sense of the 
director's intention. With the help of the com- 
puter, that vision can be a few key strokes away. 

Editor and broadcast designer Rob Rownd 

lrobroumd(<J hottnaU.com] makes 24 frame -per-second 

content for E = mc2 in New York and Los Angeles and 

for KPEVF in Chicago. 



24 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 




no time for slow builds. With this is mind, 

"On View" offers shameless plugs for 

current releases and national broadcasts of 

independent films & videos in the hope that 

you'll support them. You knows— maybe 



HEATRICAL 



IWindhorse (Shadow Distribution) 
Opens mid-April. Set in current-day 
Tibet under Chinese occupation, the 
dramatic feature follows Dolkan, a 
Tibetan singer who aspires to pop 
stardom. However, her collabora- 
tion with Chinese authorities is com- 
promised when her cousin, a Buddhist nun, is 
tortured because of her faith. Paul Wagner's 
impressive first feature, shot secretly in 
Nepal and Tibet on digital video, takes 
full advantage of his extensive documen- 
tary background to bring a dramatic 
sense of place while conveying the chill- 
ingly oppressive climate of contemporary 
Tibet. 

Hard (Jour de Fete Films) Opens 
March 26. A brutal serial killer of young 
male hustlers is hunted by a rookie detec- 
tive who himself becomes the quarry. 
John Huckert's LA-shot thriller, was 
inspired by Seven and has already 
received wildly polarised views on its 
brave and hard-hitting content. 

This is My Father (Sony Pictures 
Classics) Opens April 30. A triumph for 
brothers Aidan Quinn, DP Declan 
Quinn and, particularly, first-time fea- 
ture writer/director Paul Quinn in this 
beautifully wrought and tragic story set in 
Ireland of the 1930s. Paul Quinn treats the 
tragic love story between Aidan and radiant 
newcomer Moya Farrelly with sensitivity and 
assurance, delivering a tale of pathos and pas- 
sion without any of the green-tinted glasses a 
production like this may have been filtered 
through. 

TELEVISION 

A Letter without Words (PBS, April 5, 10 p.m.) 
Lisa Lewenz uses her own material in collabo- 
ration with pioneering amateur color film shot 



by her late grandmother Ella to tell the tale of 
one family's German Jewish identity and mem- 
ory. This account of the wealthy Lewenzes 
includes footage of family friends such as Albert 
Einstein, Brigette Helm, and Gerard Haptman, 
shot against the backdrop of the rising Third 
Reich. Lisa's contemporary footage, which 
includes interviews with Ella's surviving chil- 
dren, diaries, photos, and home movies, pro- 
vides a compelling counterpoint to the 20s and 
30s footage, which together weave the tapestry 
of one family's generational travels through the 
20th century. 

Forgotten Fires (PBS, April 29, 10 p.m.) 
Michael Chandler's account of race-hate 
crimes in South Carolina is salutary for anyone 
who thinks that racial antagonism is burying its 
ugly head. The film focuses on the burning of 
two black churches in Clarendon County. In 
his filming of the Haley family that effectively 
rules the county like feudal lords, Chandler 




allows viewers to make up 
their own minds as to the motives underlying 
racial tensions and the arson attacks. This 
study of irrationality features a remarkably 
frank arsonist Timothy Welch, and the black 
churchgoing community quite openly showing 
their sense of loss. In addition, some of the 
apparently secret night footage of Grand 
Dragon Horace King at Klan rallies is chilling. 
Vietnam Long Time Coming (rebroadcast 
on NBC, April 17, 4 p.m.) Impressive doc 
charting the reunion of Vietnamese and U.S. 
vets on a two -week bicycle ride from one end of 
Vietnam to the other. [See "Fresh Produce," 
Dec. 1998.] 

Paul Power 



AUDIOA'IDEO 
POST PRODUCTION 



▲ 

VoiceWorks® 
Sound Studios 
212-541-6592 

Media 100 XS System 

After Effects /Boris Effects 
Scanner / Photoshop 

Sonic Solutions 
Digital Audio Editing 

Voice Over Casting 
Voice Over Recording 
Reasonable Rates!!! 



353 West 48th Street 2nd Floor 

New York, New York 10036 

FAX: 212-541-8139 

K-Muil: vworksC"' aol.com 



Avid On-Line 
AVR-77 with 3D 



Interformat On-Line with 
D-2, DigiBeta 



Multi-Format 
Duplication 

Standards Conversions 



Beta SP & 
DV Camera Rentals 



212-213-0426 




Pf37 



7H M a d i s on Avenue 
New York, NY 1 O O 1 6 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 25 



CASTING THE 

CASTING DIRECTOR 

by Amy Goodman 

I roducer Sandra Katz has tried for three years to raise money 
for Nothing Men, a film by first-time director John Serpe. "It's a vicious 
cycle," she says. "You can't get all your financing until you get a name 
actor, and you can't get a name actor until you get your financing." 

Sound familiar.' It's a common scenario: A first-time director and 
producer are seeking $1 million and a cast for an independent feature. 
They have a script, hut are having trouble convincing anyone to read 
it. Agents and managers don't have the time or patience to consider a 
project with no money and no shooting date. Investors want to know 
what talent is attached and the filmmakers don't happen to be friends 
with A-list talent — or B-list, for that matter. 

Enter the casting director. She (the Casting Society of America esti- 
mates that three out of four casting directors are female) has been cast- 
ing long enough to have developed relationships with agents, man- 



AS NAME TALENT BECOMES A KEY TO FILM 



FINANCING, MORE CASTING DIRECTORS ARE 



ASKING FOR PRODUCER CREDITS 



these questions to an array of directors, producers, and casting direc- 
tors. 



J 



ULiETTE Taylor has been a casting director in New York for 
the past three decades and is a firsthand witness to the evolution of her 
trade. Her credits include "around 30" of Woody Allen's films and 
many features by Mike Nichols, Nora Ephron, and Alan Parker. 
According to Taylor, the casting director began as a kind of adminis- 
trator. "There was a period probably up until the early sixties when 
casting directors in the big studios only made grocery lists and had big 
cattle calls for actors," she recalls. "It was not a selective process. 
Marion Dougherty was really the person who broke the mold." 
Dougherty revolutionized her art during her tenure as unofficial queen 
of New York television and feature casting, spawning half the casting 




agers, and actors. They trust her. 

Here comes the latest twist: After a month of pitching, our hypo- 
thetical casting director gets the script in front of supermodel Claudia 
Schiffer, whom the director agrees would be great in the role of the 
blonde girlfriend, and Schiffer agrees to attach her name. According to 
Phoenician Films' VP of Production Mark McGarry, Claudia Schiffer 
means $400,000 in German pre-sales. Soon, an investor returns calls. 
As a result, an agent returns calls. Next the casting director is talking 
to Stephen Dorff, who also means big money overseas. A few months 
later, the cast is locked, the film is fully financed, and the first day of 
principle photography is set. Upon her request, the casting director 
(who has since moved on to two or three new projects) will be listed as 
associate producer. 

This scenerio is happening more and more often these days, and it 
raises a few questions. What exactly is the role of a casting director in 
independent film today? Is it legitimate for a casting director to get a 
producer credit if he or she indirectly assists in financing a film? How 
do casting directors — and producers and directors, for that matter — 
balance a film's creative and financial needs? The Independent posed 



directors in this article. "Before Marion, casting directors were more 
secretarial and organizational; nobody really looked at them for their 
opinions. They were up against directors who expected to see hundreds 
of people, all of them the same. But Marion chose to show directors two 
or three actors who were all quite different. She added dimension to 
the roles she cast. Of course, people loved that because she was so cre- 
ative and bright and had such great instincts." According to Taylor, 
Dougherty was one of the people who pushed the casting director's 
name from the credits crawl at the back of the picture to the main title 
credits at the front. 

When casting directors were elevated from facilitators to creative 
players, their power increased accordingly. With the advent of inde- 
pendent film, there has been another metamorphosis in the casting 
director's role. As a result of the increasing pressure to cast name tal- 
ent, the role of casting director in low-budget independents has 
evolved past the creative stage; it has become, in some ways, produco- 
rial. It is a well-known fact that the market for low-budget film is flood- 
ed with product and that the supply of funds has dwindled. Investors, 



26 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



studios, and distributors are scrambling to hedge their bets. "Studios or 
mini-majors are always driven to make sure they can leverage their risk 
by having some sort of quantifiable commercial entity," says Ted Hope, 
Good Machine's co-founder/producer, "i.e. a star." Due to the increas- 
ing pressure to cast name talent, for many rookie directors and pro- 
ducers attaching a seasoned, well-connected casting director may indi- 
rectly determine the size of their budget. In some cases, she may mean 
the difference between development hell and a green light. If a film 
gets its financing because of the talent attached and the casting direc- 
tor is the creative and strategic force behind this, then she is effective- 
ly helping to produce the film. Or so the argument goes. 

Todd M. Thaler is one of those casting directors who now has an 
associate producer credit to his name. After beginning his film career 
in production, Thaler moved into casting and cast such films as Heavy, 
Copland, and Mr. Jealousy. Recently, however, Thaler started itching to 
get back into production. In 1997, he sheparded a film by William 
DeVizi called Lesser Prophets through a lengthy, troubled casting 
process and managed to convince actor John Turturro to commit. 
Since Turturro is an "actor magnet," according to Thaler, the rest of 
the cast and financing fell into place. "They were happy to reward me 
with [an associate producer] credit," he says, "because they wouldn't 
necessarily have to reward me with any more money." Is what he did 



whether that's attaching names or not. It's different if somebody comes 
to me and the budget of their movie will change drastically or they 
don't have money in the bank. Then because of what I may be able to 
do for them — enable them to make their movie — asking for producer 
credit is viable." 

The request for producer credit is by no means standard among 
casting directors, at least not yet. Many casting directors have no inter- 
est in producing or producer credit whatsoever, including such stal- 
warts as Ellen Lewis {Big Night, Goodfellas), Laura Rosenthal (Velvet 
Goldmine, Bullets Over Broadway), and Ann Goulder (Welcome to the 
Dollhouse, Happmess). They recognize the financial implications of 
casting, but see it primarily as a creative act. 

For independent films with larger budgets, established producers 
and directors, or the support of a more reputable production company, 
the role for the casting director is typically a more traditional one. The 
producers might even cast the leads themselves. "If I'm developing a 
script and trying to attach an actor to help with the financing," says 
Good Machine's Ted Hope, "there's not a huge list there. Plus, we're 
pretty savvy on who the companies like as up-and-comers [so] we'd 
probably cast leads by ourselves." In such cases, a casting director is 
hired after the leads are locked. Higher budgets may also allow the pro- 
ducer to sufficiently pay a casting director up front. 




considered producing. 7 Although Thaler acknowledges he wasn't a 
"hands-on, on-the-set, continue-on-through-postproduction kind of 
producer," he feels the title fits. "Considering the situation," he says, 
"who really is as much a producer but me? I truly feel that if I'm going 
to avail myself to low- or no-budget films, films that come to me before 
there's even a promise of full financing, my reward will be included in 
that producing unit." 

Casting director Susan Shopmaker (Hurricane Streets, Ties to Rachel) 
got her first associate producer credit on a film she cast last summer 
called Saturn, which she describes as "a very small movie ... a true 
labor of love." Like Thaler, Shopmaker had been entertaining the idea 
of moving from casting to producing and believes that "the credits you 
get on these smaller movies hopefully become a means to an end." 
Careful to qualify the terms under which she would ask for a producer 
credit, Shopmaker says such a request "depends on the size and scope 
of the movie and how the budget changes because of my involvement. 
If somebody comes to me with a simple budget and they've got money 
in the bank, it is my job as casting director to try to do what they want, 



Many casting directors will tell you that, typically, working on inde- 
pendents takes time, energy, and tremendous patience for little finan- 
cial gain. A casting director must be willing to break down walls with 
finesse and win the interest of actors and their representation despite 
the fact that the project may not yet be financed. "This is the same 
thing a producer is doing," says casting director-turned-producer Alexa 
Fogel, who recently quit her job helming ABC/New York's casting 
department to produce her own projects. "It's based entirely on your 
energy and your relationships, and it is exhausting, producorial work." 
Over the years, Fogel has been approached "all the time" by indepen- 
dents to "put together packages that ultimately lead to financing" in 
return for either a nominal fee or a deferment. Fogel estimates that "by 
and large, casting directors make less than heads of any other depart- 
ment." She says they are "trying to rally enough so that there's a stan- 
dard that can be applied as far as pay scales, but it's tough. There is 
always someone who might do it for less." Especially in independent 
film, many casting directors do not get paid upfront. 

That is one reason why many casting directors are asking for some- 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 27 




thing else — additional credit, or speculative involvement on the back 
end. Producer Laura Bickford (Playing God, Bongwater) is developing a 
film for which she hired a casting director specifically "to cast a role to 
get us the money." She insists that giving this person a producer credit 
"seems a ridiculous use of [the] credit, because that's what casting direc- 
tors are supposed to do. We've paid this casting director a small fee, and 
she'll get a bigger fee and a percentage — a participation in the movie 
(which a casting director normally wouldn't get) — if she gets the star 
that makes the movie. She wouldn't do it for a producing credit alone." 

There are those who will, however. "I'd much rather have a produc- 
ing credit than a monetary reward," says Bonnie Finnegan, who has 
been a casting consultant for Paramount Television/New York for almost 
20 years and whose casting credits include The Prince of Tides and The 
Mirror Has Two Faces. "You don't do independent films for the money; 
there isn't any money. You work on them because you like the writing 
and the director and because it expands your world a little bit." 
Finnegan echoes the main reason cited by casting directors for working 
on independent films — the pleasure of nurturing unusual, innovative 
material. "Some of the scripts are completely different from the TV 
work I do," Finnegan says. "In my mind the TV stuff supplements work- 
ing on independent films that pay nothing, but the writing is so extra- 
ordinary." 

Everyone agrees that bringing in money is a producer's job. So if a 
casting director's efforts help supply you with your budget, why not 
oblige him or her with a producing credit? 

Before doling out credits, you might first stop to consider the other 
side of this question. Namely, how do we determine exactly why a pro- 
ject is greenlighted? Are we sure it's because of the talent the casting 
director brought in? If so, shouldn't the director get producer credit, 
since he's probably the one who makes final casting decisions? And 
what about the actor? "If actors find out that your financing has come 
about because of their involvement," says Hope, "they, more than a 
casting director, have the legitimacy to speak of producer credit." Then 
there's the writer. Every casting director will tell you that actors most 
often commit to a project based on the strength of script. "The only way 
you can approach anybody with name value in the independent arena," 
says Fogel, "is to entice them with material that is worthy or a phenom- 
enal role to act. You have nothing else to offer. You can't offer money." 
So if the play, and not the player, is still the thing, shouldn't the writer 
get producer credit? 



The way producers are settling this question — at least for 
the moment — is described by Hope: "If the movie is being 
financed on the basis of the cast that the casting director 
truly brought in, current expectations are that the casting 
director would receive some form of producer credit. But 
it's often impossible to attribute an actor's commitment to 
only one person's effort." Therefore, he notes, casting 
directors with producing credits are still in the minority. 

I HE JOB OF CASTING DIRECTOR TODAY IS VERY MUCH A PRE- 
carious creative -financial balancing act, as the pressure has 
increased to bring in name actors in order to attract finan- 
cial backers. As Bickford says, "Everybody needs a hook to 
sell a movie, and the easiest hook is a star." But most cast- 
ing directors — whether they want producer credit or not — 
have expressed frustration at the increasing limitations that 
casting known names imposes on their creative process. 
"I would hope that I can bring the best actor to the part 
and be a possible creative entity, but this happens less and less," says 
Shopmaker. "I think the whole business has changed — and there's the 
word right there: business." 

"In every small film, casting names has been an issue, and I dread 
it," says Ellen Lewis. Likewise, according to Fogel, the growing impor- 
tance of casting name talent "is ruining us. If star power is what is nec- 
essary in a foreign sales market, then we have no choice but to adhere to 
what's being dictated. But do I think we have a limited pool from which 
to cast? Do I think that to some degree it's eroding the aesthetic possi- 
bilities? Absolutely. Without question." Put more bluntly, High Art direc- 
tor Lisa Cholodenko says, "I've seen that kind of casting fuck up a lot of 
films that otherwise could have been good." 

There are, of course, countless examples of independent films that 
have been successful despite the relative anonymity of their casts. Pi, 
Welcome to the Dollhouse, High Art, and Girls Town are just a few exam- 
ples of films that have created, rather than capitalized on, name talent. 
"That kind of casting isn't really dead," says Ann Goulder. "When I cast 
The Adventures of Sebastian Cole, which was made on a very small bud- 
get, the money was already there, and the director, Ted Williams, had a 
great, refreshing attitude: he wanted the best actor for the part and was- 
n't desperate for names." 

Among the reasons for making films independently is the ability to 
maintain artistic freedom without submitting to genres, financial pres- 
sures, or mainstream cultural taste. Producer/director Jim McKay (Girls 
Town) stresses that "It's a beautiful experience for an audience to watch 
a movie and not recognize anyone. They can enter new terrain and find 
new stories; they don't just say, 'That's Stanley Tucci! I love that guy!' " 
Fogel will cast McKay's next feature, Our Song, and while McKay does 
not yet have financing in place, he insists that "I will not cast for money. 
I'm actually trying to cast unknowns." 

There will probably always be independent filmmakers who think like 
McKay, but the rise of the casting director-as-producer indicates that, in 
today's climate, casting for independent film has become as much a num- 
bers game as it is pure, unflinching artistic expression. Whatever her 
final credits, the casting director is the linchpin in this process. 

Amy Goodman is a writer living in New York City and the line producer of Treasure 
Island, a film totally devoid of name talent, which won the Special )ury Prize for 
Distinctive Vision in Filmmaking at the 1 999 Sundance Film Festival. 



28 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



Someone to Watch Over Me 

Picking a producer is like hiring your own boss. Indie veteran GlLL HOLLAND offers 
some words of advice to novice directors looking for that special someone to produce their films. 



T 

J. HE 



. HERE HAVE BEEN MANY STEREOTYPES OF MOVIE PRODUCERS OVER 
the years, hut the quintessential one has to be the fat cat smoking cig- 
ars with a platinum blonde at his side. Other variations that come to 
mind are Gene Hackman in Get Shorty, Zero Mostel in The Producers, 
and even the funny Shakespearean theater producer parodied by 
Geoffrey Rush in Shakespeare in Love. But for those of us in the inde- 
pendent film industry, where budgets are tight and hours are long, 
other stereotypes apply. Indie producers are usually broke and sleep - 
deprived, smoke cheap cigarettes, and are lucky if they have time to go 
on dates. But without one of these sorry excuses for a human being, a 
director may never realize his or her vision. Which means that direc- 
tors either have to get a producer or be able to think like one. 

There is a certain irony in the fact that a filmmaker essentially has 
to hire someone who in many ways will end up functioning as a boss. 
For a first-time writer/director, it is hard to know who will make a good 
producer. What are the qualifications/ For that matter, what is the job 
description? Producer Scott Macaulay (Joe the King; What Happened 
Was...) calls the producer the "most elastic job title in the world." 
Jamin O'Brien, a veteran first assistant director who recently produced 
his first feature, Pure, says a producer is someone who instinctively rec- 
ognizes a good story and then takes nothing and turns it into a million 
dollars. Some say that a producer is nothing but a dog with a script in 
his mouth; others that a producer is the mayonnaise in the sandwich. 
You may never really know exactly what producers do, but the sand- 
wich just doesn't taste right without the mayo. 

So what qualities should one look for? In New York you cannot 
throw a rock without hitting a film producer. How do you pick one out 
of the crowd? We asked a number of producers and directors to 
share their views on how to distinguish the wannabes from 
the doers. 



CjTo 



lORDON ERJKSEN HAS DIRECTED FOUR FEATURES 
(three in tandem with his wife, Heather Johnston 
over the last 10 years, including Lena's Dreams 
and The Love Machine; all are highly indepen- 
dent. (This is a code word for quality films with 
no stars and miniscule budgets.) "Producing 
independent films is insane," Eriksen notes, 
"and too many people want to do it because 
they think they are going to have lunch 
with beautiful actors and make lots of 
dough. You need someone with a solid 
track record who has been through the 

5 proverbial mill. In low-budget films 

~ you also need someone who is 

% going to be a friend, someone you 

| like working with, because you i 
are going to have to be in bed 



I 



is 




with them for years, suffering and celebrating together." Eriksen also 
wryly notes that it is helpful to have a producer who is "not an idiot" 
when it comes to taste, and who appreciates good actors and not just 
the pretty ones. "First-time filmmakers should beware of producers 
who are frustrated directors, because they can become too meddle- 
some in the creative process," he adds. "A good producer believes first 
and foremost in the director's artistic vision. There is a big difference 
between constructive creative input and meddling." 

Alison Swan, director of the award-winning Mixing Nia, says, "Indie 
film producing is a selfless act. You really have to wade through the 
muck to find out who is serious and as committed to the project as you 
are. You want to end up with someone who actually is getting movies 
made, not someone who is doing it for their egos or so they have some- 
thing to talk about at cocktail parties." 

Those who do it for the money are in for a rude awakening. 
"Especially in low-budget filmmaking, the first four or five projects you 
work on are probably not going to have enough money in the produc- 
tion budget to afford giving the producer a salary," says O'Brien. And 
the producer has to be able to stretch this slim budget. O'Brien sug- 
gests making the potential producer do a budget as a litmus test to see 
if they know what they're doing. If the director doesn't have the expe- 
rience to judge, then it's a good idea to show it to some experienced 
people to see if it looks right. Otherwise "you might end up with your 
right hand not having any fingers." O'Brien cannot count the number 
of budgets he has seen that don't include basic costs like negative cut- 
ting. 

Another qualification is mentioned by Jodie Markell, Obie-winning 
actress and writer/director/star of Wliy 1 Live at the RO. In her view, a 
great producer has to be a "Renaissance Man who can 
respond artistically, but also has good business sense and 
ho understands people to such an extent that he 
can talk to actors, crew members, as well as 
investors." It's true that filmmaking requires deal- 
ing with right-brainers and left-brainers who 
process information differently and want to hear 
completely different things about the same pro- 
ject. The actors want to talk on an emotional 
vel about performance and character develop- 
ment, while the investors want to know when 
and how they are going to make money. Since 
the director focuses on the actors, the produc- 
er is often in this demilitarized zone dodging 
bullets, solving problems, and strategizing. 
Bennett Miller, director of the feature 
documentary The Cruise, says succinctly 
that all you need in a producer is expert- 
ly ence, honesty, and commitment. 
"Your producer should probably be 
i someone who doesn't lie a lot." 
Sometimes experience is the 



Api3 l*w THE INDEPENDENT 29 



mportant of these three quali- 
ties. Macaulay actually thinks that 
the less experienced producer might 
be better for the job, at least in low- 
budget filmmaking, because that lack 
of knowledge can lead to blind faith, 
which gets the film done. "The more 
films you do," he says, "the more you 
think, 'I cannot do this film without 
this specific crew person or this cer- 
tain piece of equipment.' " However, 
a first-time producer is well advised to 
get an experienced person to serve as 
an executive producer and mentor 
the project. This was the case with my 
first film as a producer, Hurricane 
Streets. My first day on set, I kept 
wondering who Dolly was, why peo- 
ple called her "the Dolly," and why I 
hadn't met her yet! Thankfully, I 
brought LM Kit Carson on as execu- 
tive producer, and he was invaluable 
in the development and production 
phases of the film. 



I 



It's interesting to note how 
often honesty is mentioned as a key 
trait. One can infer from this that 

there are a lot of dishonest people running around saying they are pro- 
ducers and misrepresenting reality. The horror stories abound. 
Columbia film school graduate Fredrik Sundwall says that the produc- 
tion of his first feature Crazy (a.k.a. Hostage) was a classic nightmare 
situation. One of the Swedish producers lied about his experience, but 
Sundwall initially trusted him and did not check his references. They 
are now in court, with Sundwall accusing the producer of embezzling 
around $80,000 from the production budget. "Investigate their track 
record and find out what that person did on each film," he recom- 
mends. Since credits are often given in exchange for investments, you 
may find out that your "producer" has never set foot on a film set 
before. 

Sundwall warns directors not to rush into anything unless the pro- 
ducer has a very logical explanation for the hurry. The director should 
always make sure there is a separate corporate entity and bank account 
for the film where the director and producer have to co-sign checks. 
Also, make sure that you assign the script to the company. [See "Chain 
of Title: How Not to Get Shackled," The Independent, August/ 
September 1998.) Sundwall is now in the unfortunate position where 
this producer owns the copyright to his movie. 

Another cautionary tale about picking the wrong producer is 
recounted by a director who prefers to remain anonymous: "I was a 
classic film school grad with an award-winning short who goes to 
Hollywood and jumps at the first guys with money who came along," 
he recalls. The director had a smooth six-week shoot, then, after 
another six weeks in of editing, had a 140-minute rough assemblage. 
But at that point, "the producer decided to take over the editing." As 
a result, the hired editor quit "and the producer locked me out of the 
edit room and cut the film himself — even cutting the negative, creat- 
ing a print, and spending a gross amount of money in the process. 




With no industry connections, 
director/actor John-Luke 
Montias [Bobby G. Can't 
Swim) turned to Backstage' % 
classifieds when hunting for 
a producer — with mixed 
results. 



Supposedly, his version is dreadful. 
I broke into the edit room one 
night and downloaded some old 
cuts, since I couldn't get the mas- 
ters, and ended up escaping into 
the sunrise with about five hours of 
footage." The director cut a ver- 
sion off the VHS, and the film's 
stars paid to make 100 dubs, which 
according to the director, "look 
like mud and sound incomprehen- 
sible." Nonetheless, after showing 
the tape around and collecting 50 
letters of support, the director pre- 
vailed upon the film's investors 
(who happened to be the produc- 
er's family members) to implore 
him to release the negative, which 
he ultimately did. "So now, two 
years later, I'm finishing the film on 
my credit cards," says the director. 
Not to mention working around 
missing frames from an already-cut 
negative. 

Director Jodie Markell also had 
her share of producer nightmares. 
She tells the story of a producer 
who kept saying he had the money, 
but who disappeared the week everyone was supposed to go to loca- 
tion. The shoot obviously had to be cancelled. When they finally 
found the alleged producer and asked why he hadn't called, he said 
that he had been having dental work and his jaw had been wired shut. 
Markell says they still don't know if he was telling the truth, but notes 
that there are other forms of communication in today's society. 

This tale brings up another point: You should very clearly determine 
the producer's commitment level in terms of how much time they real- 
ly have to devote to the project and what else they have on their plate. 
On Joe the Kmg, Macaulay 's producing partners had to drop off the 
project three days before shooting and took half the financing with 
them (which demonstrates that producers as well as directors can be 
the victims of cold feet). 

When entering into discussions with potential producers, it would 
be helpful if there were a kind of codification of producer credits. 
Executive Producers have something to do with money. Producers 
(maybe they should be called "full" producers) nurture the film from 
script to screen. Line and associate producers deal with the physical 
production and postproduction or are actors who attach themselves to 
a project and enable the project to get made. (It is unfortunate that so 
much of film financing comes down to the talent attached, and many 
actors want producer credits. This is fine if they are serious about pro- 
ducing and are not just doing it for vanity's sake.) Coproducers could 
be the term used for line producers who are so experienced that they 
bring the equivalent of equity investment to the table in the form of 
free goods and services or people who bring money, connections, and 
experience. 

If you know what to expect out of a producer, you will have fewer 
problems. It is often said that the best producer is the guy who gives 
you a bag of cash and says, "Go make your movie and invite me to the 



30 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



"First-time filmmakers should beware of producers who are 
frustrated directors, because they can become too meddlesome 
in the creative process." -Gordon eriksen 



premiere." But if you need something more, it's best to know that early 
on. When looking for a producer, think long and hard about what you 
have and what you realistically can do. Then determine what you are 
missing and where you need complementing. That's where the pro- 
ducer's skills come in. 

And don't underestimate the gift they bring. Peter Glatzer, produc- 
er of Shepherd, believes producing is the hardest job in the world, espe- 
cially with first-time directors. "You are guiding them through every 
facet of production, thinking like a director yourself — about coverage 
and 'making your days.' Even if the filmmaker went to film school, they 
never had to make thirty days in a row. Then the director gets all the 
glory, gets flown around the world to film festi- 
vals, gets another picture because the industry . 
is all about building them up. The producer is 
often left starting from scratch again." 



Gordon Ericksen, director of The Love Machine, and the subjects of 
his fictionalized documentary expose of a prank "adult" website. 




^gggg gfe 



a study of sexual fantasy on the internet 

Finding the right producer can be a matter of trial and error. John- 
Luke Montias, who wrote, directed, and starred in Bobby G. Can't 
Swim, knew virtually no one in the industry when he decided to make 
his film, so he took out an ad in Backstage looking for producers. He 
met some people, decided to go with one man who said he had the 
contacts and the production team, but after six weeks the alleged pro- 
ducer had arranged only one meeting for Montias with a director of 
photography. "You gotta have somebody who actually produces some- 
thing, gets results, and follows through," Montias says. "I ended up fir- 
ing the guy and going with a producer who was a first timer but who 
was hungry and I knew I could trust him to watch my back. He is 
Dutch, so I do wish he spoke a little better English, though!" 

Gil! Holland's producing credits include Hurricane Streets, Dear Jesse, 
Desert Blue, Getting Off, Spin the Bottle, and The Eden Myth. He is 
in postproduciton on Kill by Inches and Spring Forward. 



What to Look For in a Producer 



HONESTY: You should check references, but a lot 
of times it comes down to going with your gut instinct. 

ENTHUSIASM: Not delusional enthusiasm and 
not enthusiasm for a perceived financial gain, but 
heartfelt excitement about the project and knowledge 
that producing it will be a selfless act. As a matter of 
fact, if they think they will make any money in inde- 
pendent film, they probably do not know what they're 
talking about. 

ARTISTIC HARMONY: If they think Baywatch 
is better than Casablanca, you probably should, too. 

TRACK RECORD: This can refer to previous 
films the producer has worked on, but it can also 
mean that you should look at what they have done in 
their life and assess whether they "put it all together 
and make it happen." Remember, size does matter: 
Do they have a big Rolodex? 



LUNCH: In indie film, watch out for anybody eating 
pricey lunches and "expensing them." 

REFERENCES: If more than three people say 
they would never work with that person again, it's 
probably a bad sign. 

DO THEY SNORE? You're going to be in bed 
with them for a long time. 

PAST PERFORMANCE: Do you see more 
than 12 boom-in-shots in their previous features? 
Was there any coverage? Was there a clear marketing 
concept behind the film? Did people see it and 
respond? (This does not mean the film had to make 
money!) 

While you're at it, ask a few questions of yourself, 
like, What do you really know about how to direct a 
movie? Use common sense and assess where your 
strengths are, what you need, and what you're 
expecting. 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 31 



„ (he judges of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies' editorial contest in 1998, it was my pleasure to grant one of the two top prizes in the Film 
.gory to Rob Nelson for the following essay on the politics of arthouse distribution. Nelson is film critic for the Minneapolis weekly City Pages, where 
ired. Though the film titles have changed since this article was first published, the situation remains all too much the same. 

ie Jones & the Raiders of the Lost Art 

Has the artsyplex boom housebroken 

independent film? Rob Nelson examines 

the politics of arthouse exhibition. 

. t's a cold friday night in the Twin Cities. Another long, tough week has finally 
-' come to an end. You feel like going out to a movie, just to quench your thirst 
for that thick brew of story, sound, and image. You want one of those magical 
screenings — a roomful of strangers, a beam of light, a swirl of collective ener- 
gy- 
Skimming the "Movie Guide" listings in the Star Tributes Weekend section, 

you notice that a lot of theaters under the heading "General Cinema" seem to 
wmmmi be playing Starship Troopers, some of them on two or more screens. This trig- 
gers a memory of loud TV commercials with these huge bugs squashing everything in 
their path — including some moist-looking teenagers with lily-white faces and big white 
teeth. A full- color photo of one of the slimy bugs peers out from the paper in front of 
you. You recall reading about the director, Paul Verhoeven, and how he's hoping this 
risky, $100-million blockbuster will make up for his cheap and awful Showgirls. Hmmm. 







Then you spy an ad for The Full Monty, playing at more than a half- 
dozen locations across town, including General Cinema's Centennial 
Lakes 8 and Uptown's Lagoon Cinema, the five-screen arthouse 
owned by the national Landmark chain. Same goes for Eve's Bayou: It's 
at Lagoon and at GC's 14-plex in the megamall. How odd. You 
thought Lagoon only played exclusive runs of specialty films like Fast, 
Cheap & Out of Control — which starts there tonight at 7:45. 

You pick up the phone to call your date — the die-hard cineaste who 
knows everything about movies — when you stumble upon a very long, 
very odd film title under the heading "Independents": something 
called M;y Sex Life . . . Or How I Got into an Argument. Just as you're 
mulling over how well the title resonates, your date picks up the phone 
on the first ring, pissed that you haven't called until now. By way of 
appeasement you suggest M;y Sex Life — which, had it been his sugges- 
tion, would have led, like the title, to an argument. He's thrilled, of 
course, and offers to pick you up on the way to the Seventh Place 
Cinema in downtown St. Paul. You didn't know there was a theater in 
downtown St. Paul that played those kinds of films. 

So you get there and discover that the movie is French, subtitled, 
and three hours long. Ugh. But the first scene is intrigu- 
ing: A rumpled, 29-year-old grad student in 
philosophy (who looks a lot like your 
date) is asleep at his desk atop a pile 
of papers. A narrator explains that 
this guy can't finish his disserta- 
tion and can't break up with his 
girlfriend of 10 years. To resolve 
either of these issues would mean 
that he has become a grown man, and 
he's not ready for that, in part because 
he's secretly in love with his best friend's girl- 
friend. About halfway through the film, there's a bizarre 
and hilarious scene in which the chair of the philosophy department 
enlists the guy's help in rescuing a scared, violent monkey who's stuck 
behind a boiling radiator. Meanwhile, the protagonist can't get the 
other monkeys off his back. 

The next day you're still thinking about this screwball romantic 
comedy that left you exhilarated and exhausted — appropriately, it 
seems, to the experience of surviving your 20s. You can't remember the 
last time you saw a film whose plot was based around chronic indeci- 
sion, provoking more than it resolves and causing you to wonder 
whether it's time to give your date his walking papers. You also can't 
believe how close you came to not seeing this weird, amazing movie. 



For all practical 

purposes, films that 

screen \r\ out-of-the-way places 

without the benefit of much 

publicity or critical coverage 

simply don't exist. 



I 



T WAS LESS THAN A YEAR AGO THAT THE OSCAR NOMINATIONS FOR 
Shine, Fargo, Secrets & Lies, and The Eriglish Patient got tongues wagging 
about the death of the old studio system at the hands of the grubby 
"indies." Since then, everyone from the New York Times Magazine to 
Premiere and Entertainment Weekly has been busy measuring the vast 
gulf between "the two Hollywoods": There's the big-budget nest that 
hatched the $100-million Starship Troopers, and the low-budget, "inde- 
pendent" sector that scooped up the sleeper Fast, Cheap & Out of 
Control. Never mind that the proceeds from both films flow in the 
same direction — to the Sony corporation. And never mind that the 
meager likes of M;y Sex Life get no play in this argument whatsoever. 

The split-personality profiles claim to be blowing the lid off a new 
phenomenon, and perhaps even a "revolution" (per the New York 



Times). But in fact, it was obvious to any moviegoer who paid attention 
to the 1994 ruckus around the "independent" Pulp Fiction — which 
grew consecutively from a cult must-see into a critical fetish object, a 
vehicle for John Travolta's second coming, and a $250-million world- 
wide smash — that the once-monolithic film industry had become a 
two-party system. In '94, Quentin Tarantino played the "rock 6k roll 
president" Bill Clinton to Forrest Gump's Bob Dole — or something like 
that. 

But not for long. After all, why would the major studios and their 
mega-conglomerate parents tolerate outside competition? Most mini- 
major "indie" companies have either been acquired or spawned by the 
big studios, while those studios' even larger parent corporations con- 
tinue trading media marbles at a pace that makes it hard to keep track 
of (or care about) who really owns what. 

To wit: Just before releasing Pulp Fiction and the no-budget Clerks in 
the fall of '94, Disney bought the art-film boutique Miramax to work 
the other side of the street from its live-action and animation depart- 
ments. Gramercy Pictures (Bean) is half-financed by MCA/Universal, 
which has also owned October Films (Career GiWs) since earlier this 
year. 20th Century Fox begat Fox Searchlight (The Full 
Monty); Sony Pictures Classics (The Myth of 
Fingerprints) sits on the same lot as both 
Columbia Pictures and Tri-Star Pictures; 
and New Line Cinema (Boogie Nights) 
and its offshoot, Fine Line Features 
(Shine), were absorbed in 1993 into 
the Turner empire, which was itself 
recently absorbed into the Time 
Warner empire. Disney's Miramax gave 
birth in '94 to a "genre" division called 
Dimension Films, whose Scream last year grossed 
over $100 million — roughly the same amount as Uncle 
Walt's The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Quasimodo, meet your new best 
friend, the teenage psycho killer. 

I know what you're thinking: So what! Are these corporate indies auto- 
matically devoid of artistic value! No, they aren't. But neither are they 
indies — at least not as defined by films that exist outside the studio sys- 
tem. And yet, because they're widely perceived as independent films, 
they occupy that sacred spot in the minds of audiences and critics — 
and on the screens of chain-owned arthouses — as the only alternative 
to the big-studio productions that play in the malls. Where once the 
distinction was made between big Hollywood and non-Hollywood, 
now it's between big Hollywood and little Hollywood, with the rest 
going largely unreported. 

To put it another way: Despite what we read in publications owned 
by companies that own studios in both arenas, the struggle in movies 
today isn't between the old and new Hollywoods, but between every- 
thing non-Hollywood and one increasingly powerful system — the latter 
made to seem like two distinct entities in order to retain the illusion of 
choice. Ain't democracy grand? 



M, 



.EANWHILE, THE LOW- END RANGE OF NONCORPORATE CINEMA 
stands in constant danger of falling off the map. This includes the new 
work of English-speaking iconoclasts like Abel Ferrara (The Blackout), 
Gregg Araki (Nowhere), and Steven Soderbergh (Schizopolis) ; the new 
New Wave of vital French cinema in films like A Single Girl; the old 
New Wave tradition of the still-prolific but rarely screened Jean-Luc 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 33 



BOX OFFICE 



Godard (Forever Mozart) ; the modern classics of 
Iranian auteur Abhas Kiarostami (Through the 
Olive Trees); the Japanese policiers of Takeshi 
Kitano (Sonatine) ; and the post-Chungking 
Express work of Hong Kong hipster Wong Kar- 
Wai (Fallen Angels and Happy Together) . 

If you haven't seen many (or any) of the 
above, I'm not surprised: Only four have earned 

one-time-only screenings at U Film Society's Mpls./St. Paul Film 
Festival or (in the case of Sonatine) at Asian Media Access's "Cinema 
with Passion" program at the Rivervievv. For now, take my word that 
any one ot them would be enough to preserve your faith in the medi- 
um. 

One reason these good and great films remain largely invisible is 
because they compete with a highly publicized, nationally reviewed 
roster of "independents" released by the big-studio offshoots — films 
that enjoy privileged access to chain-owned arthouses and, not coinci- 
dentally, resemble their high-budget Hollywood counterparts in being 
premised around fashionably marketable packages of stars, genres, and 
proven formulas. Ghastly as it sounds, Noah Wyle and Parker Posey 
have become the poor studio's Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman. 
Accordingly, films like Sony Pictures Classics' The Myth of Fingerprints 
and Miramax's The House of Yes benefit further from "PA tours" in 
which actors and directors are flown from city to city at the studios' 
expense, meeting journalists at each stop and generating a flurry of fluff 
just before the films open. By contrast, small companies like Strand 
Releasing (The Delta), Kino International (Fallen Angels), Zeitgeist 
Films (Taste of Cherry), and New Yorker Films (Underground) have only 
their great movies, which isn't always enough to attract attention or 
secure a screen. 

The supremacy of the bottom line is hardly surprising given that film 
is the most expensive medium around; but it is depressing that, even 
after nonstandard fare has proven its ability to attract an audience, 
there's still so much missing. For all practical purposes, films that 
screen in out-of-the-way places without the benefit of much publicity 
or critical coverage (if they screen at all) simply don't exist. And what's 
really frustrating is that most people, critics included, don't really know 
what they're missing and don't really care to know either — not when 
support for Shine registers as an easily placed vote for alternative film. 

You might say Shine is a great movie, and maybe it is — but it's also 
one whose reputation was made for reasons that had very little to do 
with its merits as filmmaking. Shine sparked a multimillion-dollar bid- 
ding war at the Sundance Film Festival because of its earning potential 
as an uplifting biopic. It benefited from an avalanche of publicity 
because of the distributor's need to protect its inevitably big invest- 
ment; and it earned prominently placed and overwhelmingly positive 
reviews because any "independent" movie with that much mainstream 
hype must be important. For the record, I like Shme. But if quality were 
the primary cause of its success, there would be a long line of films from 
smaller distributors comfortably awaiting their own mainstream acco- 
lades and artsyplex grosses. 

The odd fact is that the indie "revolution" may have made it hard- 
er, not easier, for worthy films to get out: As the number of players in 
the field has increased, so has the competition. Even the Sony empire's 
art-film division ranks as a smaller distributor in the mini-major peck- 
ing order topped by Miramax. This is because Sony Pictures Classics 
releases a higher percentage of foreign features and other films that, 
compared to the likes l r The English Patient, appear to have low com- 




fmercial potential. Locally, the release of 
_ SPC's widely acclaimed Thieves (Les Voleurs) 

was held up for five months in the Twin 
Cities, stemming from the abrupt decision of 
Landmark Theatres to cancel a mid-February 
opening at Lagoon. This news was made 
known to local critics just after the 
announcement that Thieves had failed to earn 
an Oscar nomination. 

Directed by Andre Techine (Ma Saison Preferee), Thieves is a fasci- 
nating melodrama that doubles as a crime film — even though the only 
action occurs when an unfortunate car thief makes the mistake of 
peeking around a corner. Otherwise, the movie digs deep into the rot- 
ten relationship between two brothers, a hard-boiled Lyon cop (Daniel 
Auteuil) and a gangster (Didier Bezace), who share an elusive woman 
without knowing it. Complicating matters further, Techine brilliantly 
alternates narrators, arranges a series of flash-backs and -forwards 
around one character's death, and teases his audience with the notion 
that everyone who crosses the frame is a voleur of one sort or another. 
Thieves' only crime was not being nominated for Best Foreign Film. 

Now, I'm not suggesting conspiracy here: Thieves probably does 
constitute a hard sell in the current climate. Yet it's hardly an unmar- 
ketable film. Like the hallowed Shine, Thieves earned raves at 1996 fes- 
tival screenings before its release on the coasts late last year. As a 
crime drama, it had the advantage of genre, along with distribution by 
Sony, an award at the Cannes Film Festival, a well-known star 
(Catherine Deneuve), and a director (Techine) whose much-admired 
Ma Saison Preferee had recently played at no fewer than three local 
venues. 

Still, judging from the lineup at Uptown and Lagoon during the 
week Thieves was supposed to open (Hamlet, Marvin's Room, Kolya, 
Prisoner of the Mountains, Shine, and The English Patient), we can sur- 
mise that there wasn't room for even one non-Oscar-nominated 
film — even though Shme and The English Patient could each be seen at 
no fewer than 10 other area theaters. For months afterward, Thieves 
still wasn't worth the risk of a week-long run on one of Landmark's six 
local screens. Nor was it 
picked up by another 
exhibitor in town, as 
the theater chain waf- 
fled over whether to 
exercise its customary 
privilege of first dibs. 
The independent Oak 
Street Cinema was 
finally allowed to pre- 
miere the film in mid- 
July, just before its 
release to home video 
and long after the theater 
could have hoped to capitalize on the wav< 
of national press. 



BUYERS 






B, 



'EFORE GOING ANY FURTHER, 1 
should mention that I'm not unaware 
of the basic laws of capitalism, nor do 
I mean to rip unduly on the 
Landmark chain and its friends in 



34 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



high places. I understand that the primary motivating force is greed — 
pardon me, good business. But I don't believe that chains which made a 
fortune on their audience's hunger for non-Hollywood fare should 
mock those audiences by screening predominantly safe selections. 
They might do well to remember that the fine art of movie love is 
founded equally on generosity and surprise, plus a pinch each of per- 
sonal involvement and affirmative action. 

In those terms, I'd make the following modest proposal: that 
Landmark devote one of its six screens to foreign and indie esoterica 
on a regular basis. This year's release dates being equal, for example, 
Lagoon/Uptown could have passed on Smilhx's Sense of Snow, Love 
Serenade, Kicked in the Head, Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, Going All the 
Way, and Paradise Road (none of which stood to be huge box-office hits 
or critical faves — and weren't) in favor of, say, Soderbergh's Schizopolis, 
Eye of Cod with Martha Plimpton, the French Nenette et Boni by direc- 
tor Claire Denis (J Can't Sleep), the basketball doc Soul in the Hole, the 
Jim Thompson adaptation This World, Then the Fireworks, and the 
Japanimist Tetsuo II: Body Hammer, to name a few. None of the latter 
are without distributors or commercial potential, and none of them 
have played elsewhere in town or been actively pursued by our indie 
exhibitors. 

Recently I put this one-in-six idea to a Landmark vice president, 
Bert Manzari — a smart, funny, and honest gentleman with whom I've 
maintained a friendly debate about 
the politics of distribution over the 
last two years. Speaking from his 
L.A. office, where he makes booking 
decisions for Lagoon/Uptown as well 
as Landmark's 150 other screens 
across the country, Manzari summa- 
rized his position as "a delicate bal- 
ancing act." He emphasized Land- 
mark's refusal to book "commercial" 
films like Titanic and As Good As It 
Gets. Later, apropos of the chain's long runs of commercial films like 
Shine and The English Patient — the latter 19 weeks past its release to 
suburbia — he explained that it's hard to tell a distributor with whom 
he's trying to keep "the best possible relationship" that a movie should 
close when it's still doing big business. He noted that Shine and Patient 
grossed twice as much at Uptown/Lagoon than elsewhere, and that he 
was "under a tremendous amount of pressure" to keep Marvin's Room 
open. 

As for Thieves: "We screwed up," he said. "We should not have tried 
to book anything for that period." He explained that there are simply 
too few screens in Minneapolis to "get deeper into eclecticism," adding 
that in cities like Seattle, where Landmark controls 28 screens, the 
programming better suits my personal taste. I told him that the point 
isn't my taste, but the need for more variety and more titles from small- 
er distributors. He told me it was too bad I didn't live in Seattle. 

Manzari went on to explain that Landmark has to pay for the 
Lagoon complex, built two years ago in a pricey urban location. Of 
course. But would one screen out of six really jeopardize that goal? The 
traffic through these theaters is always brisk, and on weekends they're 
often jammed: Put something weird and great on one of those screens, 
place a few tiny ads, and, especially as reviews of Landmark films 
appear to be given priority at local newspapers, the audience will come. 
And if they don't? Consider it a worthy investment in the local film 
culture, dividends to follow. 



If quality were the primary cause 

of a film's success, there would 

be a long line of films from 

smaller distributors comfortably 
awaiting their own mainstream 

accolades and artsyplex grosses. 



As it stands, the Uptown and Lagoon do show some great films; and 
some of these, owing to their distributors' acquisition power, are among 
the very best of the year. And that, in fact, is the rub: In terms of its 
steady access to high-profile product, Landmark has a virtual monop- 
oly on arthouse moneymakers. By contrast, U Film Society has been 
able to snare only two premiere runs of mini-major product in the last 
12 months: Miramax's barely supported Albino Alligator in mid-May 
and Fine Line's stigmatized Gummo in December, the bookings of 
which clearly evinced their distributors' lack of confidence. 

It wasn't always this way. Three years ago, at the time of the 
Miramax/Pn!p Fiction boom, U Film Society enjoyed an exclusive, 15- 
week premiere engagement of Miramax's Clerks, which was enough to 
butter U Film's bread for the rest of another typically risk-taking sea- 
son. Miramax must have rightly figured that Clerks' core audience 
lived on campus, and that a long run even at a second-tier arthouse 
would help the film gather word-of-mouth momentum. 

But everything changed with the arrival of Lagoon's five screens a 
few months later (on the very day after Clerks closed up shop at U 
Film, ironically). Landmark was able to hold-over successful titles as 
long as it needed to extract a film's full gross, which added further to 
the appeal of a theater featuring modern decor, state-of-the-art pro- 
jection and sound equipment, and a well-trod location. 

Of course, these advantages are of great interest to independent dis- 
tributors as well — to the extent 
that the vast majority of these 
companies won't consider booking 
their films anywhere until 
Landmark has passed on them 
(which can take several months). 
And since Lagoon/Uptown's reper- 
toire in the last year has included 
the occasional foreign and/or inde- 
pendent title on slow weeks (e.g. 
Fire and Guantanamera) , the 
promise of a Landmark playdate now carries the hint of likelihood. 

Oddly, to squelch competition in this way could only be to the dis- 
tributors' disadvantage. Granted, independent theaters cannot afford 
the same rental agreements as Landmark, nor are they likely to bring 
in as many ticket buyers. But some box office is better than nothing — 
which looks to be the reward of locally unscreened films like Nowhere 
and This World, Then the Fireworks. These and other titles have either 
been released to video or are headed there soon because their distrib- 
utors feel that if they can't get into Landmark, there's no use trying 
elsewhere. 

Here's where the arrival of other arthouses such as the Reading 
Cinema chain's newly acquired St. Anthony Main could be benefi- 
cial — not least in convincing distributors who underestimate the Twin 
Cities' art-film culture (no thanks to the caricatured yokels in Fargo) 
that there is a buck or two to be turned even at a non- Landmark 
venue. Competition of this sort would likely solidify Landmark's com- 
mitments to playing the titles it wants — leaving the others free to find 
their own exclusive engagements. There's plenty to go around. (On 
the national level, the recent announcement of Robert Redford's deal 
with the mainstream General Cinemas chain for the creation of 
Sundance artsyplexes also bodes well in terms of increasing competi- 
tion and exposure — especially if this chain adopted a measure of the 
Sundance festival's benevolence toward uncommercial films and/or 
those without distributors.) 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 35 




T, 



H *.& ^ #? $? ?j& si 

5, . 



SCREENPLAY 



June 15th, 1999 

ROSARITO BEACH, 
BAJA CALIFORNIA 

ihp filming location of the rnovip epic, "TITANIC" 




1ST PRIZE $2,000 plus 
2ND PRIZE $1,000 plus 
3RD PRIZE $500 plus 



FOR INFORMATION & APPLICATION 
Send S.A.S.E. to our U.S. Border address 

BISC 

P.O.Box 439030 

SanYsidro, CA 92143 

(619) 615-9977 




Marion O. Hoffman 

1 

New Community Cinemas 

presents 

The 3rd Annual 

Huntington 

International 

Film Festival 

July 1999 

Seeking fiction & documentary features from around 
the world and short films from Long Island & NY 
Metro Region for the festival and "Meet the Maker" 
ongoing independent film series. Exhibition formats 
include 35mm, 16mm, betacam, 3/4" video. 

Call 800.423.7611 
Email CinArtsCtr@aol.com 
Fax 516.423.5411 
Mail Cinema Arts Centre 

P.O. Box 498 

Huntington, NY 11743 



Food for Thought 



• In Minneapolis, Landmark yanked John 
Boorman's The General three days before it was 
scheduled to open. Why? The 1999 Oscar nomina- 
tions had just been announced, and nominees 
Life Is Beautiful, Hilary and Jackie, Central 
Station, Little Voice, and Elizabeth were held over 
instead (even though Life Is Beautiful, Little 
Voice, and Elizabeth could already be seen 
elsewhere in town). 

• Your feelings matter. Call your local papers and 
theaters and express your views. And remember — 
when specialty films do play, vote with your feet. 



HE OBVIOUS COUNTERPOINT HERE IS THE RISK 
OF OVERSATURATING THE ART-FILM MARKET. But it's 
equally obvious that the audience for The Full 
Monty is not the same as for Sonatine or Soul in the 
Hole — just as, in the local theater scene, Jeune 
Lune is able to pay its bills despite Rent. The reali- 
ty is that there is a substantial audience for off- 
Uptown indie fare, as proven by the number of suc- 
cessful one- and two-night-only engagements this 
year. In September, Oak Street packed the house 
for its sneak previews of Michael Moore's new doc- 
umentary feature The Big One (acquired by 
Miramax for a song — and after the Oak Street gig 
had been booked, natch). Two back-to-back 
screenings were sold out, and a third at midnight might have been, too, had Miramax not for- 
bade it. (Suggestion to Miramax: How about giving Oak Street a crack at running this philo- 
sophically independent film when it opens next year?) 

Similarly, Walker Art Center's previews of Spike Lee's 4 Little Girls were jam-packed, as were 
its Juneteenth Film Festival showings of Charles Burnett's Nightjohn; the Walker also crammed 
'em in tor two screenings of Sarah Jacobson's self-distributed sex-romp Mary Jane's Not a Virgin 
Anymore. Asian Media Access took a rare and successful break from action films with the 
romantic melodrama Comrades, Almost a Love Story at the Riverview Theater. And the Parkway 
was rewarded for daring to premiere two American documentaries for extended runs: Paradise 
Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills and Troublesome Creek: A Midwestern, both of which 
became word-of-mouth sleepers. (The theater also capably handled about half of this year's 
Twin Cities Black Film Festival.) 

And then there's U Film Society — which, despite struggles that could convincingly be 
pinned on any of two dozen or more factors, pulled off another pair of essential Mpls./St. Paul 
and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender film festivals to enthusiastic crowd support. In 
terms of what this organization brings to the Twin Cities, it bears mentioning that in 1997 U 
Film premiered the following 10 movies, all of them superb: La Ceremonie, The Wife, Project 
Grizzly, The Keeper, Three Lives and Only One Death, Irma Vep, East Side Story, Pretty Village, 
Pretty Flame, Flamenco, and Ulysses' Gaze. And as this story was going to press, U Film 
announced plans to open Emir Kusturica's Underground on January 9. This screwball war movie 
about Yugoslavia's violent history has had a tough time opening anywhere since winning the 
Palme d'Or at Cannes in 1995 — which is another way of saying that it's one of a kind. 

Now, you can take these examples in one of two ways: as evidence that plenty of great for- 
eign and fringe cinema does make it to these parts, and so I should quit my crabbing; or as a 
reminder that U Film's perennially precarious condition stems largely from its daring, which 
ought to continue at all costs and especially in the artsyplex era. If we agree on the latter, then 
keeping up with what's coming out at U Film and other indie venues will require the close (and, 
at times, special) attention of buffs and critics. 

On that score, however, movie lovers meet the passive resistance of some powerful players, 
not least among them daily-newspaper critics like the Star Tribune's Jeff Strickler. About a year 
ago, Strickler told a Minnesota Daily reporter that coverage of indies other than Landmark fare 
is limited in his paper by meager space and resources, then added a revealing comment: "My 
job is to report and review, not to support local filmmaking. It is not my job to sell tickets to 
their movies." 

So if I understand this correctly, the Strife's comprehensive and prominently placed coverage 
of studio films week in and week out does not constitute "selling tickets to their movies." It's 
simply a matter of "reporting and reviewing" whatever's most worthy of attention. In practice, 
this has meant that a movie that's wide-released by a major studio, even if it sucks, is automat- 
ically deemed more worthy than a foreign and/or independent movie playing at Oak Street or 
U Film, even if it's great (and could use a leg up). The justification: The studio movie is the one 
most readers will be interested in. And the reason for thatl It's never discussed, only proven 
again and again. 

No conspiracy theory here, either. The problem with a lot of film reviewing isn't necessarily 
that the critics are prohibited from writing about revival films or independent features at length, 



36 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



but that they wouldn't want to. And maybe 
the bulk of their readers wouldn't want them 
to either — but I have a feeling we'll never 
know about that. And so, per Casablanca, it's 
still the same old story. 

Which reminds me: Any film town that 
can provide screens for Gumma, Sick, and The 
Ride on the same weekend — as well as an 
Elvis double-bill at Oak Street, a Hong Kong 
kick-fest at the Riverview, a French movie 
about a street urchin at the Parkway, a pro- 
gram of local shorts at Bryant-Lake Bowl, 
some British TV ads at the Walker, and a pair 
of documentaries about pot-smoking and 
Hasidism at U Film, not to mention the anti- 
American Starship Troopers at area theaters — 
is a film town worth living in. But why stop 
there? Why settle for a great film scene when 
we could have an even better one? 

1 OSTSCRIPT: MOVIE NIRVANA, SCENE 1, 
Take 1. Enough about the politics of movie 
distribution. Pure and simple: Great movie 
plus attentive audience equals bliss. About 
six weeks ago, I was part of an audience at 
one of those magical screenings. For reasons 
that will soon become clear, I can't tell you 
the name of the movie. Suffice to say that it's 
foreign; it has opened successfully in New 
York and L.A.; and its distributor has been 
waiting for a definitive answer from the local 
arthouse chain. And it's one of the best films 
of 1997. 

Anyway, we were packed in a tiny room 
watching this beautiful film that featured a 
pair of drop-dead gorgeous actors, a hot sex 
scene, spectacular scenery, and a pulsating 
soundtrack. It resembled the other brilliant 
work of its director, and yet it was like noth- 
ing else he or anyone had ever done before. It 
was, in short, the definition of "visionary" 
filmmaking. 

Now a confession: This private screening 
took place at my house, in a flagrant breach 
of preview-tape etiquette. My friends and I 
had a great time — but the whole thing 
seemed a little sad, too. Sad because we were 
watching this consummate work of cinema 
on videotape. Sad because this film was with- 
out a local release date and I didn't know 
when I'd get to write about it. Sad because it 
reminded me again that daring and originali- 
ty are seldom seen as virtues in the market- 
place. But mostly it was sad because you 
couldn't be there. 

Rob Nelson is the film editor at City Pages and a 
member of the National Society of Film Critics. 



American Montage, Inc. 





Digital /Analog 

Film, Video & Web Production 

Post-Production Specialists 

After Effects / Motion Graphics 

ixperienced in feature length 
locumentaries and narratives 



375 WEST B'WAY 3R, NY, NY 10012 

3 3 4-8283 

www.americanmontage.com 

WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS 



Classes offered monthly 

Introduction to Media Composer, 
Tips and Techniques, and Media 
Composer Effects. 



The Wexner Center for the Arts is an 
Avid Authorized Education Center 
serving Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, 
Western Pennsylvania and Kentucky. 

Call for more information 

Maria Troy, 6/4 292-7617 

Wexner Center for the Arts 

The Ohio State University 
1871 North High Street 
Columbus, Ohio 43210 



Film Video Arts 




serving independents since 1 9 6 £ 

30th Anniversary Benefit 

Lincoln Center's Walter Reade Theater 
May 25, 1999 



celebrating 



Honorees 

Filmmaker Mira Nair 
{Mississippi Masala, Kama Sutra) 

Film/Video Arts Co-Founder Rodger Larson 
New York State Council on the Arts 



years 21 2 .673.93 6 1 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 37 






www.aivf.org 



DISTRIBUTOR F.A..**,. 




(: 



'mft 



Enterta i n ment 



BY LlSSA GlBBS 

Stratosphere Entertainment, 767 Fifth Ave, 47th fl., 
New York, NY 10153; (212) 605-1010; fax: (212) 813- 
0300; stratent@aol.com. Contact: T.C. Rice, vice 
president of distribution and marketing. 



The great quality of our films and the quality of our dis- 
tribution of them. 

How many works are in your collection? 

What collection 7 There are currently 10 films in our 
library — four in release and six upcoming! 




Left: T.C. Rice, VP of 
Distribution and Marketing 
at Stratosphere. 
Right: The girls in the band 
in Katja Von Garnier's 
Bandits. 



film? Good ones. 

Best known title in Stratosphere's collection: 

The Thief. 

What's your basic approach to releasing a title? 

It's hard to say because we really take each film on an 
individual basis and go from there. 

Where do you find your titles? 

We look at films at all stages of pro- 
duction. And we look at them anywhere 
we can find them. Really. 

Range of production budgets of titles 
in your collection: 

From the low six figures and up. 



Elina Lowensohn 
and Norman Reedus 
share a moment in 
Six Ways to Sunday 



What is Stratosphere? 

We're a new theatrical motion picture distribution com- 
pany based in New York City. 

Who is Stratosphere? 

Founded by investor Carl Icahn and former film profes- 
sor Paul E. Cohen, it is currently run by Richard 
Abramowitz. 

Total number of employees: 

15. 

When did Stratosphere come into being? 

In the fall of 1997. 

Driving philosophy behind Stratosphere: 

To get as much attention as we can for our films with- 
out spending like a studio. 

What would people be most surprised to learn 
about Stratosphere? 



38 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



Films and filmmakers you distribute: 

Some of the filmmakers we work with include 
Gillies MacKinnon, Katja von Gamier, Ada 
Bernstein, Benoit Jacquot, Rowan Woods, and 
Joan Chen. 

What types of works do you distribute? 
Good ones. 

What drives you to acquire the films you do? 

It's a combination of things, but primarily we 
look for quality films with unique visions that 
we feel can be successful in the marketplace 

Is Stratosphere also involved in co-pro- 
duction or co-financing of works? 

Not at the moment, but soon we are looking 
to be. 

Is there such a thing as a "Stratosphere" 





Most important issue facing Stratosphere today: 

Finding new films and doing a great job releasing the 
ones we already have. 

Where will Stratosphere be 10 years from now? 

Ideally, we'll be making and releasing films. 

Best distribution experience you've had lately: 

The enthusiastic response to our line-up by exhibitors 
and the press. 

If you weren't distributing films, what would you be 

doing? 

Repping them. 

Other distributors you admire and why: 

Some of the foreign sales agents I like are Curb, 
Forefront, Fortissimo, and Amazing. They are all very 
honest and do a good job. 

The difference between Stratosphere and other dis- 
tributors of independent films is . . . 

I refuse to speak ill of our competition. 

If you could only give independent filmmakers one 
bit of advice it would be to . . . 

get a decent still photographer. 

Upcoming titles to watch for: 

We've got six new films opening so far in 1999: The 
School of Flesh, directed by Benoit Jacquot, as adapt- 
ed from a novel by Yukio Mishima and starring Isabelle 
Huppert; Six Ways to Sunday, by Adam Bernstein, 
based on the novel Portrait of a Young Man Drowning 
and featuring pop icon Deborah Harry; Bandits, by Katja 
Von Gamier, about a four women who form a rock band 
in prison as a form of rehabilitation; Hideous Kinky, by 
Gillies MacKinnon and starring Kate Winslet; Xiu Xiu, 
actress Joan Chen's directorial debut; and The Boys, by 
Australian director Rowan Woods. 

Famous last words: 

Don't walk too closely behind elephants. 

Lissa Gibbs is a contributing editor to The Independent and 
former Film Arts Foundation Fest director. 




DTD 
Authoring <fc Encoding 



212-242-0444 



DUPLICATIOilf 
POST PRODVCTIOM 



Media 100 Editing 

DVD Authoring 
MPEG 2 Encoding 

DVD Burning 

Video Duplication 

Transfers & Conversions 

145 West 20th St. 
New York, NY 10011 
Fax: 212-242-4419 



Film Festival Duplication Special 



20 VHS Tapes 

w/sleeves & labels 

Independents 

Only 



Betacam SP 

DV & DVCAM 

3/4 SP Hi-8 SVHS 
Component Editing 

Transfers, Window Dubs 
45/hr 340/day 175/night 




1 123 Broadway, Suite 814 
New York, New York 10010 

www2.infohouse.com/earthvideo 



212-228-4254 




All In One Productions 

Your Low Budget Production Paradise 

Newest Software V 5.0— supports 16:9 DTV 

MJf -*" *f S%S% On-line Quality 

ilffGCs/cJ 7C/U As low as $200/Day 

Non-Linear Digital Editing Systems FOR /f/C/V/*Edttors Available 

G3s, 91 GIGs, 300 MB of RAM, Support ALL Formats 

After Effects, Commotion, Boris Effects, Photoshop, Illustrator, ProTools... 

Multi-lingual Voice Over, Titling & Sub-Titling 

Chinese, Spanish, Russian. Japanese, Korean. Hindi, Arabic. Italian, Tagalog, English, and counting 

DV Cloning, Timecode Bum-in, Multi-Format Transfers & Dubs 
www.AllinOne-USA.com (212) 334 4778 401 Broadway, Suite 2012, NYC 




April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 39 






S3Z8 



Creative Capital 
Foundation 

by Michelle Coe 




Creative Capital Founda- 
tion, 65 Bleecker Street, 7th fl., 
New York, NY 10013; (212) 598- 
9900; fax: 598-4934; submissions 
©creative-capital. org; www.cre- 
ative-capital.org. Contact: Ruby 
Lerner, executive director; Esther 
Robinson, media/performing arts 
program officer. 



What is the Creative Capital Foundation? 

Creative Capital is a new national organization that will 
manage a revolving tax-exempt fund designed to sup- 
port artists who are pursuing innovative, experimental 
approaches to form and/or content in the visual, per- 
forming, and media arts. 

How, when, and why did Creative Capital come into 
being? 

All kinds of developments in the 1990s — good and 
bad — made it clear to a wide variety of people that a 
healthy society had to support freedom and continual 
creativity. Artists, entrepreneurs, and arts funders 



talked together in 1997 and 1998 and initiated Creative 
Capital. It began operations on January 4th, 1999. 

What is your relationship to the Warhol Foundation? 

Archibald Gillies, president of the Warhol Foundation, 
has taken the leadership role in developing the Creative 
Capital idea and by January 1999 had enlisted 14 other 
foundations and individuals to support the effort. The 
foundation is providing us with office space and some 
in-kind support. We are, however, a separately incor- 
porated 501(c)(3) organization and have no legal 
affiliation with the Warhol Foundation. 

What is your relationship to AIVF? 

six years as executive director of AIVF taught me 
that, as hard as it is for producers to find money to 
produce work, it's even harder to get media work 
out into the world. This seems to be the more dif- 
ficult part of the equation, and it's what we're 
going to focus on at Creative Capital. 

The driving philosophy behind Creative 
Capital is . . . 

In contrast to traditional charitable grants pro- 
grams in the arts, which usually provide only 
one-time financial assistance to an artist, 
Creative Capital will work closely with the 
artists it supports to help ensure the success 
of their projects by providing other non-artis- 
tic assistance (for exam- 
ple, marketing campaign 
approaches, researching 
distributors, etc). Crea- 
tive Capital will help each 
project maximize its 
audience potential by 
providing resources it 
needs in order to suc- 
ceed. 

In return for Creative 
Capital's financial and 
managerial support, 
artists selected will share 
a portion of the proceeds 
generated by their pro- 
jects with Creative 
Capital's fund. These 
proceeds will be used to replenish the fund and will 
enable Creative Capital to support more artists in the 
future. 

The Creative Capital concept will not be right for all 
artists or projects, however. While we are providing a 
valuable service we will, unfortunately, not be the sole 
solution to the serious funding problems facing individ- 
ual artists. 

What is the total amount of funding that you will 
have for grants? 

We hope to have at least one million dollars a year for 
project support. We will grant out about $700,000, hold- 



.pPPlI ■■ ■PIP 



mm 






t 


1 




LCXHt 








1 




II 


li 


13 


HI 




11 


24 ' an 










MH ar 




1 









New York's only Louis Sullivan building serves as headquarters. 
(Below) January 4: Creative Capital's birthday. 



ing the remaining $300,000 in reserve for further pro- 
motional and exhibition support for funded projects. 

What percentage of your overall funding will go 
towards film or video projects? 

Approximately 25%. 

How many media awards are given out per year? For 
other disciplines? 

We hope to award approximately 20 grants in each dis- 
cipline area each yean 20 in media, 20 in performing 
arts, 20 in visual arts, and 20 in new media/interdisci- 
plinary arts. 

What will the average grant sizes be? 

Most initial grants (about 15 in each discipline) will be 
in the $5,000 range, with a few (about five) in the $15- 
20,000 range for projects further along in their develop- 
ment. 

What are the requirements for media applicants? 
Are there geographic limitations? 

We are in the process of creating guidelines now. We 
will be providing support to artists working in the United 
States who are over 18 years of age. We are a national 
fund, but some money has been earmarked by funders 
for specific regions, including New York, California, 
Minnesota, and Hawaii. 

Do you fund projects at various stages of production 
(e.g., script, development, production, distribution, 
etc.)? 

We haven't made this decision yet, but given our limit- 
ed resources, we will probably have some restrictions. 

Explain your funding cycle and deadlines. 



40 THE INDEPENDENT April 



For this year, our open submission period will be July 1 
to August 15. There will be a preliminary proposal round 
which will require applicants to submit a one-page pro- 
posal and a resume. Successful candidates will then be 
asked to submit a more detailed project and budget 
which will be reviewed by a panel. We hope to notify 
these candidates before the Christmas holidays. 

Who makes up the staff of the Creative Capital 
Foundation? 

Ruby Lerner, executive director; Leslie Singer, director of 
administration; Ken Chu, visual arts program officer; 
Esther Robinson, media/performing arts program offi- 
cer; Eugene Hernandez, web consultant; and Jodi 
Magee, development consultant. 

Who makes the awards decisions? 

We will work with independent panels of five to seven 
people from the field who will make funding recommen- 
dations. The panel decisions will go to the board for 
final approval. 

What advice do you have for media artists in putting 
forth a strong application? 

There are so many projects that are worthy of support, 
and we'll only be able to fund a small number. It will be 
critical to communicate what is unique about your pro- 
ject, what makes your project a bold and innovative 
one. We are also very interested in helping artists reach 
audiences, so people who have thought about who the 
audiences are for their work will probably make a 
stronger impression. 

In your experience with funding panels and organi- 
zations, what are common mistakes that applicants 
make? 

A lack of clarity in communicating the core ideas in their 
work and poor work samples. 

What would people most be surprised to learn 
about this new foundation? 

That it is not an endowed foundation and will have to 
fundraise and earn its annual budget each year, just like 
any other arts organization. 

Other foundations or grantmaking organizations 
you admire and why. 

The Warhol Foundation, the Jerome Foundation, the 
Rockefeller Foundation, the Texas Filmmaker Fund, and 
Jim McKay and Michael Stipe's C-100 efforts. They are 
all creative funders willing to take risks, and all have 
taken leadership roles within the arts field. 

Famous last words: 

Be bold! 

Meet the staff of this exciting new foundation and find out 
more about Creative Capital's submission process. Ruby 
Lerner and Esther Robinson will be featured in AlVF's June 
Meet & Greet. Stay in touch with our website, or check out the 
June issue of The Independent. 

Michelle Coe is program and information sen/ices director at AIVF. 




Northeast Negative Matchers, Inc. 



Your Avid Film Composer Matchback Specialists 



Negative cutting & Conforming 

y 35mm 
> 16mm 
y Super 16mm 



i&S&P^ 



413-736-2177 1,413-734-1211 • 800-370-CUTS 



25 Riverview Terrace 
Springfield, MA 1 1 08- 1 603 



www.nenm.com 
e-mail: nenm(q)nenm.com 




Spin Cycle Post 

Proudly congratulates the 

following 1999 Sundance 

award-winning films: 



Three Seasons 

Grand Jury Prize 

Audience Award 

Cinematography Award 

Judy Berlin 

Directing Award 

Santitos 

Latin American Cinema 
Award 

Come Unto Me 

Honorable Mention-Short 



Spin Cycle Post is a full-service 
post-production facility. 

1 2 West 27th Street. 6th Fl. 

New York. NY 10001 

T (212) 679-2720 • F (212) 679-2730 



Pro Tools • Sound Editing 

• Surround Sound • ADR • 
Automated Mix to Picture • 
Foley • SFX • Sound Design 

• Custom Music 



1 Media100XR*HDRReal 


Time FX 


• Adobe After 


Effects • 


Photoshop • D3 


Digital 


• Betacam SP • 


Off-Line 


• On-Line • Ani- 


mation • 


FULL ON-LOCATION 


Services 








601 Gates Road • Vestal, NY 13850 
SERVING INDEPENDENTS SINCE 1971 

1-800-464-9754 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 41 



by Scott Castle 

LISTINGS DO NOT CONSTITUTE AN ENDORSEMENT. WE 
RECOMMEND THAT YOU CONTACT THE FESTIVAL 
DIRECTLY BEFORE SENDING CASSETTES, AS DETAILS 
MAY CHANGE AFTER THE MAGAZINE GOES TO PRESS. 
DEADLINE: 1ST OF THE MONTH TWO MONTHS PRIOR 
TO COVER DATE (APRIL 1 FOR JUNE ISSUE). INCLUDE 
FESTIVAL DATES, CATEGORIES, PRIZES, ENTRY FEES, 
DEADLINES, FORMATS & CONTACT INFO. SEND TO: FES- 
TIVALS@AIVF.ORG 



Domestic 

black harvest international film and video festi- 
VAL. Aug., IL. Deadline: May 1. Film Center at the School of 
the Art Institute of Chicago presents 5th annual test, a show- 
case for contemporary cinema & video from the African dias- 
pora. Black Harvest will feature films from around the world, 
reflecting black cultural, political & social experiences. 
Offerings from African nations, the U.S.. Britain, Canada. 
Latin America & the Caribbean are expected. Recent African 
American film & video provide the core of the test. Directors 
will present feature-length & short work in all genres & an 
artists panel will provide additional commentary & insight on 
the black experience in film. Entry fee: none. Contact: Black 
Harvest Int'l Film & Video Fest, The Film Center. The School 
of the Art Institute of Chicago, Columbus Drive at Jackson 
Boulevard, Chicago, IL 60603; (312) 443-3734; fax: 332- 
5859; jallan@artic.edu 

BOSTON JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL, Nov. 4-14. Deadline: May 
30. Fest is a non-competitive event, presenting the best con- 
temporary films & videos from around the world that deal w/ 
Jewish themes. It has become one of the highlights of 
Boston's cultural calendar & is the best-attended Jewish 
event in the city, w/ an audience of over 8.500 attending last 
fall's 10th annual fest. It consistently receives excellent 
media coverage & has frequently been recognized for the 
excellence in programming. The festival presents narrative, 
doc, animated & experimental works. Formats; 35mm. 
16mm. Beta or 1/2". They can be of any length. Submissions 
must not have previously screened in the Boston area. 
Preview on VHS (NTSC or Pal). No entry fee. Contact: BJFF, 99 
Moody St., Waltham. MA 02453; (781) 899-3830; fax: 899- 
3799; BJFF@aol.com; www.bjff.cyways.com 

BRECKENRIDGE FESTIVAL OF FILM. Sept 16-19, CO. 
Deadline: May 30 for scripts & June 30 for films. 19th annu- 
al festival presents 4 day program of films, receptions, pre- 
mieres, tributes, writers' seminars & film education activi- 
ties, providing unique & varied filmfare shown at venues 
throughout the community. Approximately 50 independent US 
& int'l films are presented from over 300 entries. Best of Fest 
awarded to films in 5 categories: drama, comedy, doc, fami- 
ly/children & shorts. Our third Annual Screenplay competition 
will honor 1st place winners in adult drama, children/family, 
comedy & action/adventure categories. Formats; 16mm & 
3/4". Preview on VHS (NTSC only). Scripts should meet US 
Motion Picture Industry standards & be 90-130 pages in 
length. Contact; Terese Keil, Breckenndge Festival of Film, 
Box 718. Riverwalk Center, 150 W. Adams, Breckenndge, CO 
80424; (970) 453-6200: fax: 453-2692; filmfest® 



brecknet.com; www. brecknet.com/bff/home.html 

CENTRAL FLORIDA FILM & VIDEO FESTIVAL. Sept 24-0ct 3, 
FL. Deadlines: June 1 (early); June 25 (late). Celebrating 17th 
year, Florida's oldest film & video fest continues commitment 
to encourage, support & foster indie filmmaking; to recognize, 
promote & exhibit indie films; & to honor & reward the inde- 
pendent filmmaker. Entrants receive viewer response sheets; 
cash awards & prizes given to winning artists in each cate- 
gory in addition to Audience & Best of Fest awards (over 
$6,000 in cash, services & prizes awarded in 1997). Fest will 
tour throughout Central Florida & include such cities as 
Orlando, Melbourne, Gainesville & Tampa. Fest accepts 
shorts & features. All formats, genres 
& categories welcome (incl. anima- 
tion, doc, experimental, narrative, 



Chicago 
Underground 
Film Festival 

"If you suspect your film is 
underground, it probably is," explains festi- 
val programmer Bryan Wendorf. Now plan- 
ning its sixth installment, the Chicago 
Underground Film Festival asserts itself as 
a prime showcase for DIY cinema. "When 
enough of a film will repulse or confuse the 
mainstream, then it's underground," adds 
Jay Bliznik, the test's founder. Last year's 
six-day fest included 125 films, from 1 min. 
animated shorts to 100 min. narratives 
"shot on home video." Each year the fest 
also presents the Jack Smith Lifetime 
Achievement Award, whose past recipients 
have included Kenneth Anger, George 
Kuchar, and Paul Morrissey. Pictured: 1998 
doc award-winner Mark Hejna. [See listing.] 



music videos & features). Fest receives entries from all over 
US & int'lly (over 120 films/videos selected in 1998). Entry 
fees: $20 to $40, depending on length. Preview on VHS. 
Contact: CFFVF c/o Brenda Joyner, 1906 E. Robinson St., 
Orlando, FL 32803; (407) 839-6045; fax: 898-0504; 
filmmaker@cffvf.org; www.cffvf.org 

CHICAGO INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN'S FILM FESTIVAL . 
Oct. 14-24, IL. Deadline; May 28. The CICFF is the largest 
competitive festival for films & videos for children in North 
America, which programs over 150 films & videos targeted 
primarily for children ages 6-13. Productions must have a 
production completion date of 1997 or later & be dubbed or 
subtitled in English. Six live action & six animated categories 
w/ awards given by both adult & child juries. Best of fest 
award & Kenneth F & Harle Montgomery award both incl. 
cash prize of $2500. Preview on VHS (NTSC or PAL). Entry 
fees; $35 (short, 59 min. or less); $75 (feature). For entry 
forms & guidelines write; CICFF, c/o Facets Multimedia, 1517 
West Fullerton Ave., Chicago. IL 60614; (773) 281-9075; fax: 



929-0266; kidsfest@facets.org 

CHICAGO UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL, Aug. IL. 
Deadline May 15. Competitive festival now in its 6th year fea- 
turing works of underground, independent & experimental film 
& videomakers. Looking for works that innovate in form &/or 
content & transcend the mainstream of indie filmmaking. 
Past guest filmmakers have included Richard Kern, Kenneth 
Anger, George Kuchar, John Waters & Paul Morrissey. 1999 
guest to be announced. Also presents festival-sponsored 
screenings throughout the year. Cash prizes given to the best 
film or video in these categories: Feature, Short, 
Experimental, Doc, Animation & Audience Choice Award. 
Entry Fee $30. Late deadline June 1. Formats: 
35mm, 16mm, S-8, Video. Preview on 1/2" VHS. 
Contact; Bryan Wendorf, Chicago Underground Film 
Festival, 3109 North Western Ave. Chicago, IL 
60618; (773) 327-FILM; fax: 327-3464, 
info@cuff.org; www.cuff.org 

CINE ACCION FESTIVAL ICINE LATINO! Sept. 16- 
19, San Franciso, CA ; Sept. 25-26, Berkeley, CA. 
Deadline: April 16. Cine Accion, the nation's oldest 
Latino media arts org., seeks film & video works 
reflecting diversity of Latino community for its 7th 
annual fest. All film & video works by, for & about Latinos & 
Chicanos in U.S. as well as works that originate in Latin 
America & the Caribbean are encouraged to submit. Festival 
is open to all lengths and genres of works completed after 
Jan. 1995. English subtitles strongly recommended. Entry fee: 
$35 (non Cine Accion members; cost incl. a 1 yr. member- 
ship), $10 (Cine Accion members). Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 
video. Preview on VHS. Contact: Cine Accion, Rosalia 
Valencia, Director, 346 9th St., San Francisco. CA 94103; 
(415) 553-8140; cineaccion@aol.com 

CONTENT '99, May 19-22, CA. Deadlines: April 19 (early), 
April 27 (final). The Natl Education Media Network presents 
its 13th Annual Media Market & biennial Conference for pro- 
ducers & distributors. The Market — the only one in the nation 
devoted exclusively to educational works — seeks submis- 
sions by film/video producers. At the conference attendees 
learn the latest trends in production, distribution & exhibition 
(registration continues on site for conference only May 20- 
21). Rates vary, discounts avail, for '99 Apple Awards 
Competition entrants. CONTENT will culminate in the 29th 
Annual Apple Awards Film & Video Festival at the Oakland 
Museum of California. Send request for brochure & forms to 
NEMN, 655 Thirteenth St., Ste. 100, Oakland, CA 94612; 
(510) 465-6885; fax: 465-2835; content@nemn.org 

DANCES WITH FILMS: FESTIVAL OF THE UNKNOWNS, July 
23-29, CA. Deadline: April 30 (early); May 14 (late). Fest 
promises "No politics. No stars. No shit." Fest is a competi- 
tive event featuring a line-up of a dozen feature-length nar- 
rative films & a dozen narrative shorts. All films admitted for 
screening are selected using only one major criterion; they 
must have been completed w/out any known director, actors, 
producers, or monies from known sources (e.g., known pro- 
duction companies). Films must have been completed by Jan. 
1, 1997. Formats: 16mm, 35mm, Beta SP Preview on VHS. 
Entry fee: $50 (feature/early); $35 (short/early); all late 
entries are $75. Contact: DWF, Box 1766, Beverly Hills, CA 
90213; (323) 656-1974; fax: 656-6471; dwfilmfest® 
aol.com; www.hometown.aol.com/dwfilmfest 



42 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



ate 



HOTDNxniru.Lm * 



WORLDWIDE 
REPRESENTATION-/^- SHORT FILMS 



e ► 



f .AXX GTMRTS 

• Distribution/sales 

• Press Kits 
•Submissions 

• Tons of Exhibitions 

>HNDnOKCI< 

CHARLOTTE RAGERT - STEVEN LEV1NE 



jgj-la FAX 212.717.0144 



NOUVEAUXFlLMS@HOTMAIL.COM 



Film Fest Postal Station* 1594 York Ave • Box #23 • New York, NY 10028 






■ '•■\jtfd M 

5th Annual 

LOS ANGELES 
INDEPENDENT 
FILM FESTIVAL 

APRIL 15 - 20 



.^■iiiWiru j ■[ 




DRIVE 
W^ INDEPENDENTLY 



Airlines 



FOR FESTIVAL INFO 
OR VISIT 1 





FESTIVALS 



CALL FOR 
ENTRIES 




SEPTEMBER 7-12, 1999 

LATE SUMMER ON THE 
COAST OF MAINE 

Documentaries 

Coastal & Mountain Films 

Shorts 

Ecological/cultural 

DEADLINES: 

JUNE 1ST 

FINAL DEADLINE 

JULY 1ST 



^£&&2£333@E 




j^TUffl jp.a&e^fl^L, 



PO Box 550 

Bar Harbor, ME 04609 

www.barharborfilmfest.com 

207.288.3686 

e.mail: info@bhff.com 



Got film? 



Then let the crowds drink them in at the 

Rehoboth Beach 

Independent Film Festival 

Nov. 12 - 15 
Set on the scenic Delaware Coast 

• Six theaters • Lectures and receptions 

• 100* films • Video programs 

Entry deadline: Sept 12, 1998 



P.O. Box 1132 • Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971 

( J 2 ) 2 2 6-3744 

www.rehobothfilm.com 

beachrun@dmv.com 




Rehoboth Beach Film Society 



INDEPENDENT FEATURE FILM MARKET, Sept. 17-24, NY 
Early deadline: May 21; final deadline, June 11. The 
Independent Feature Film Market is the only U.S. market 
devoted to new, emerging film talent. Market is attended by 
over 2,500 filmmakers, distributors, television & home video 
buyers, agents, development executives & festival program- 
mers from the U.S. & abroad. IFFM is currently accepting 
submissions for the upcoming 21st Market in the following 
categories: feature films (over 75 min.), short films (under 60 
min.), works-in-progress (edited scenes, trailer, intended for 
feature-length), script (copyrighted, for feature-length film). 
Separate membership & entry fees apply. All applicants must 
be current IFP or FAF members. Contact: IFP, 104 West 29th 
St., 12 fl, NY, NY 10001; (212) 465-8200; fax: 465-8525; 
IFPNY@ifp.org; www.ifp.org 

LONG ISLAND FILM FESTIVAL, May & July, NY Deadline: 
May 1; June 1 for screenplays. A leading showcase for inde- 
pendent film, last year's fest screened over 50 features & 60 
shorts selected from entries submitted from around the 
world. Fest celebrates its 16th year at four diverse venues: 
the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, IMAC in 
Huntington, Staller Center/Stony Brook & the Cinema Arts 
Center. Cats: arts & entertainment, doc & education & stu- 
dent. Fest is competitive w/ 1st prizes presented in all cats 
(film & video). Cash awards to be announced. Entry fees: up 
to 15 minutes-$25 (30 min. & under); $40 (31-60 min.); $75 
(over 60 min). Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 1/2". Preview 
on VHS. For entry forms, contact Chris Cooke, LIFF, Box 
13243, Hauppauge, NY 11788; (800) 762-4796; fax: (516) 
853-4888; www.lifilm.org 

MAINE STUDENT FILM & VIDEO FESTIVAL, July 10. ME. 
Deadline: June 1. 22nd fest will be held in conjunction w/the 
Maine Int'l Film Fest. MSFVF is open to Maine residents 19 
years of age & younger. Entries are accepted in all film & 
video formats & are divided into 3 categories: Pre-Teen 
Division (Grades K-6), Junior Division (Grades 7-9) & Senior 
Division (Grades 10-12). Submitted movies are reviewed by 
3 judges: an educator, a media arts professional & a past 
MSFVF winner. Winners & finalists receive a certificate of 
merit & prizes such as movie tickets & videotapes. Grand 
prize winner, selected from the Senior Division, receives a 
scholarship worth $1,400 for the 2-week Young Filmmakers 
Program at Int'l Film & Televison Workshops, Rockport, 
Maine. All formats accepted. Entry fee: none. Contact: Huey, 
Fest Director, MSFVF, Box 4320, Portland, ME 04101-0520; 
(207) 773-1130; hueyfilm@nlis.net; www.agate.net/~ile/ 
mama/guest.html 

MARGARET MEAD FILM & VIDEO FESTIVAL, Nov, NY 
Deadline: May 8. Premier festival in US for indie/doc film & 
video. This year's themes: religious movements, body art, 
children, outer space; any strong nonfiction titles; all lengths 
eligible. Film-/videomakers whose works are selected receive 
pass to all festival events; limited financial assistance & 
housing avail. After NY fest presentation, many titles pack- 
aged & tour to ind. film centers, museums & universities as 
part of nat'l touring festival. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 
1/2", Beta (NTSC only). Preview: 1/2" VHS. Contact: MMFVF, 
American Museum of Natural History, Dept. of Education, 
Central Park West at 79th St., NY, NY 10024; (212) 769-5305; 
fax: 769-5329; meadfest@amnh.org; www.amnh.org/Mead/ 

MARIN COUNTY SHORT FILM FESTIVAL, July 1-5, CA. 



Deadline: April 16. Fest runs as part of the Marin Co. Fair w/ 
films screening daily. Cats: narrative, doc, animated, experi- 
mental & family. Up to $2,400 in awards. Maximum running 
time is 30 min. Films must have been completed after Jan. 1, 
1997. Formats: 16mm only. Preview on VHS. Entry fee: $25 
(domestic), $40 (int'l). Entry forms, contact: Mann Co. Fair, 
Ave. of the Flags, San Rafael, CA 94903; (415) 499-6400; 
fax: 499-3700; pgoodin@marin.org 



MILL VALLEY FILM FESTIVAL & VIDEO FESTIVAL, Oct. 7-17. 
CA. Deadline: May 31 (early); June 30 (final); fee: $20 
(early); $25 (final). Invitational, noncompetitive fest screens 
American ind., narrative, doc, animated, short & experimen- 
tal films/videos in over 40 programs. Fest has become pre- 
miere West Coast event, w/ commitment to bringing new & 
innovative works to Northern CA audiences. Filmmakers, dis- 
tributors, press & large local audience meet in "an atmos- 
phere where professional relationships thrive." All genres 
encouraged. Fest incl. around 100 programs of ind. features, 
docs, shorts & video works, as well as interactive exhibits, 
tributes, children's filmfest, seminars & special events. 
Entries must have been completed w/in previous 18 mo.; 
industrial, promotional or instructional works not appropri- 
ate; premieres & new works emphasized. Annual audiences 
estimated at 35,000. Formats: 35mm, 16mm, 3/4", 1/2", 
Beta, multimedia. Contact: Mark Fishkin, executive dir., Film 
Institute of Northern California, Mill Valley Film Fest, Mill 
Creek Plaza, 38 Miller Avenue, Ste 6, Mill Valley, CA 94941; 
(415) 383-5256; fax; 383-8606; finc@well.com; 
www.finc.org 

NEXTFRAME: UFVA's TOURING FESTIVAL OF INTERNA- 
TIONAL STUDENT FILM & VIDEO, Sept., PA. Deadline: May 
31, fee $25, $20 UFVA members & int'l entries. Early bird 
deadline April 30 (save $5). Festival founded in 1993 to sur- 
vey & exhibit the very best in current student film & video 
worldwide. Emphasizes independence, creativity & new 
approaches to visual media. All entries must have been cre- 
ated by students enrolled in a college, university or graduate 
school at time of prod. & should have been completed no 
earlier than May of previous 2 yrs. Work may have originated 
in any format but must be submitted for preview on VHS. 
Works considered in categories of animation, doc, experi- 
mental & narrative. All works prescreened by panel of 
film/videomakers; finalists sent to judges. Over $15,000 in 
prizes awarded. First, second & third place prizes awarded in 
each category plus an Audience Award & Director's Choice 
Prize. Starting this year, NextFrame will hold a technical com- 
petition, incl. prizes for film editing, cinematography & sound 
design (additional $5 fee for entry into technical competi- 
tion). About 30 works showcased each year. All works pre- 
viewed at annual conference of University Film & Video 
Association (UFVA), in Aug. at Emerson College, Boston. 
Premiere held in Philadelphia in Sept. Year-long int'l tour of 
selected fest finalists begins after premiere. Tour travels to 
major universities & art centers across the United States & 
around the globe. Past int'l venues have included Mexico, 
Australia, Colombia, Uruguay, the Philippines, New Zealand, 
Portugal, & Canada. UFVA is int'l org dedicated to arts & sci- 
ences of film & video & development of motion pictures as 
medium of communication. UFVA's Int'l Fest Directory for 
Students avail, on website. Exhibition formats: 35mm, 
16mm, Beta, 3/4", 1/2". Contact: NextFrame, Dept. Film & 
Media Arts, Temple University, Philadelphia PA 19122; (800) 



44 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



499-UFVA; fax: (215) 204-6740; ufva@vm.temple.edii; 
www.temple.edu/nextframe 

NOMAD VIDEOFILM FESTIVAL, June, West Coast. Deadline: 
April 21. Berkeley-based NVF has been a Pacific Coast tour- 
ing venue for alternative media since 1992, w/ stops in Port 
Townsend WA, Seattle, Portland, San Fran., Santa Monica & 
others. The 1999 tour opens June 5th at Fine Arts Cinema in 
Berkeley. This year's theme: "the videopoem" — 12 min. 
maximum. Preview on VHS. For info & entry form contact: 
NVF, Antero Alii, Box 7518 Berkeley CA 94707; (510) 464- 
4640; anteros@speakeasy.org 

SOUTH BEACH ANIMATION FILM FESTIVAL, May 6, FL. 

Deadline: April 30. The most outstanding works will be 
screened during the Anti Film Festival at Alliance Cinema in 
South Beach, FL. Entries should not exceed 20 min. Preview 
on VHS. Tapes will not be returned. Entry fee: $5. Contact: 
SBAFF, Imagine That Prod., 1172 S. Dixie Highway, Ste. 110, 
Coral Gables, FL 33146; (305) 674-9998. 

WILLIAMSBURG BROOKLYN FILM FESTIVAL, June, NY. 
Deadline: May 5. Presented in collaboration w/ Williamsburg 
Art & Historical Center. Int'l fest showcases works in film & 
video in following categories: feature (above 75 min), doc, 
experimental & short subject. Selected entries will be award- 
ed the "Chameleon" statuette & prizes. Filmmakers will par- 
ticipate in Q&A sessions & panel discussions. Formats: 
35mm, 16mm, Beta, 1/2". Preview on 1/2" only — non- 
returnable. Entry fee: $30. Contact: Marco Ursino, Festival 
Director, WAH Center, 135 Broadway, Brooklyn, NY 11211; 
(718) 388-4306; WBFF99@aol.com; www.wahcenter.org 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S FILM & VIDEO FESTIVAL, June, OR 
Deadline: May. Founded in 1975, this is an annual juried sur- 
vey of outstanding work by grade & high school students 
from the Northwest (OR, WA, ID, MT, AK). A jury reviews 
entries & assembles a program for public presentation. 
Judges Certificates awarded. About 20 films & videos are 
selected each year. Entries must have been made w/in pre- 
vious two years. Formats accepted: 35mm, 16mm, Super 8, 
3/4", 1/2", Hi8. Entry fee: none. Contact: Julie Quarter, 
Festival Coordinator, Northwest Film Center, 1219 SW Park 
Ave., Portland, OR 97205; (503) 221-1156; fax: 294-0874; 
info@nwfilm.org 

Foreign 

BRITISH SHORT FILM FESTIVAL, Sept. 16-23, England. 
Deadline: June 1. BBC-sponsored fest takes place at the UCI 
Empire in London's Leicester Square. During the course of a 
week filmmakers are given the opportunity to screen their 
films at a prestigious cinema in the heart of London. The fes- 
tival also enables filmmakers to network w/ like-minded 
people & industry professionals. Short films of all genres are 
accepted (40 min. or under). Fest is competitive (categs vary 
each year) & awards will be given. Formats: 16mm, 35mm, 
3/4", Beta SP PAL, S-VHS, VHS. Preview on VHS. No entry 
fee. For entry form, contact: BSFF, Lisa Murray, Festival 
Coordinator, B202 Centre House, 56 Wood Lane, London, 
W12 7SB ; Oil 44 181 743-8000 x.62222; fax: 181 740-8540. 

CARROUSEL INTERNATIONAL DU FILM DE RIMOUSKI, 

Sept. 20-27, Canada. Deadline: May 16. 17th annual fest 
aims to promote cinema for young people though animation, 



WHEN IT COMES TO 

ENTERTAINMENT & 

MEDIA INSURANCE 



WE ARE 
THE EXPERTS! 




DeWIH STERN 
GROUP, INC, 

NEW YORK 

420 LEXINGTON AVENUE 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 10170-0199 

TEL: (212) 867-3550 • FAX: (212) 983-6483 

JOLYON F. STERN, President 



CAROL A. BRESSI-CILONA, SR. Vice Pres. 



AFFILIATES IN: LONDON • PARIS • MUNICH 



THE 




A not-for-profit media arts 
organization providing access 
to broadcast quality video 
post-production services for artists 
& independent producers at 
drastically discounted rates. 
— Standby also publishes FELIX, 
A Journal of Media Arts and 
Communication. — 



• Interformat Online Edit 


$ 85/hr 


• Digital Audio Post 


$ 85/hr 


• Digi Beta to D2 Edit 


$120/hr 


• Duplication & Conversions 


Inquire 


Contact us for other 


services, 



prices and access information. 



POB 184, New York, NY 10012 
Email: maria@standby.org 
Phone: (212) 219-0951 
Fax: (212) 219-0563 
www.standby.org 



New England's Finest Showcase of Independent Film & Uideo 




thampton Film Festival 




tel: 413-586-3471 
fax:413-584-4432 
filmfest@nohofilm.or9 



November 3-7, 1999 
Northampton, MA 

"The No. 1 Small Arts Town 
in the Country" 



Call for Entries 



Deadline June 30 

For information and an entry form: 

visit www.nohofilm.org 

or send SASE to 

Northampton Film Festival 

351 Pleasant St., No. 213 

Northampton, MA 01060 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 45 



FESTIVALS 




33rd Annual NEWYORK EXPOSITION OF SHORT FILM AND VIDEO 



SHORTS 

UNDER 10 MINUTES) 
FICTION 
ANIMATION 

DOCUMENTARY 

EXPERIMENTAL 
NEW DIGITAL MEDIA 

Co-sponsored by The New School and supported 
by the New York State Council on the Arts, the 
Experimental Television Center. Eastman Kodak, 
Barbizon Electric, Future Media Concepts. 




DEADLINE JUNE 1,1999 

festival NOVEMBER 1999 

One of the Major American Festivals of Independent Rims. 
—THE HEW TORK TIKES 

The ideal forum for breaking new indie work. 
— VILLAGE VOICE 



FOR ENTRY FORM AND GUIDELINES: New York Expo 

532 La Guardia Place Ste 330 New York. NY 10012 

nyexpo@aol.com www.yrd.com/nyexpo 212 505 7742 



CALL FOR 
ENTRIES 



Documentary Makers: 

Video Animation Stand 

3 CCD CAMERA 





Smooth Moves 
Best Price In New York 

Contact: Peter cascone 



419 park avenue South 
TEL: 212-689-7678 



NEW YORK, NY 10016 
FAX: 212-689-7544 



— TMUM&lH 



an independent film feiuvajr ..* 

> 
may 7th - 9th, 1999 

Birmingham, alabama 



the first annual 



SIDEWALK MOVING PICTURE FESTIVAL 

For more information, phone: 205.414.1984. fax: 205.870.0393 
info@sidewalkfest.com. 

www.sidewalkfest.com. 

(every SIDEWALK tells a story.) 



introductory & learning activities, film screenings & 
exchanges among the various int'l players in the film indus- 
try. Films must not have commercial distribution in Canada 
& not screened at any other Quebec festival. Films must be 
dubbed in French or in its original version w/out subtitles & 
accompanied by the written texts of dialogue & narration in 
French or English. Cats: long & short (competition), long & 
short (information), retro &/or tribute. Awards: Best long 
film, short film, actor, actress; Humanitas award & public 
award. Jury members are 14-17 yrs old & from various coun- 
tries. Formats: 16mm, 35mm, 3/4". For entry form contact: 
Carrousel, 10 est rue de I'Evanche, CP 1462, Rimouski, 
Quebec, Canada G5L 8M3; (413) 722-0103; fax: 724-9504; 
cifr@carrousel.qc.ca 

EURO UNDERGROUND, Oct. 14-Nov. 22; Krakow, Poland; 
Paris, France; Sofia, Bulgaria; Berlin, Germany & Brussels, 
Belgium w/ possible other countries TBA. Deadline: June 1. 
3rd annual Euro Underground is produced by the Int'l Film & 
Performance Society, a cross-cultural arts organization 
exhibiting works in Europe & throughout the world. EU & the 
IFPS offers filmmakers a global exhibition network. Prizes 
include post-festival exhibition in Europe, Asia & South 
America. Euro Underground seeks underground, independent 
& experimental film & video for their fall '99 European festi- 
vals. Cats include: features, shorts, docs, animation, exper- 
imental, installation, performance video & digital work. Euro 
Underground will exhibit work on a year-round basis. Euro 
Underground Fall festival is the main event w/ exhibition 
series set up throughout the year. Filmmakers are encour- 
aged to enter early for consideration in the global exhibition 
network. Cats: feature, doc, experimental, short, anima- 
tion/digital, installation, performance video. Formats: 35mm, 
16mm, 3/4", 1/2". First round judging: preview on VHS. $25 
for short work 60 min. or under; $35 for work over 60 min. 
Contact: Euro Underground, 1658 N. Milwaukee Ave, Ste 
142, Chicago IL 60647; (888) 864-9644; fax (773) 292- 
9205; lnfo@eurounderground.org; www.eurounderground.org 

GALWAY FILM FLEADH, July 6-11, Ireland. Deadline: May 
28. 11th annual test is int'lly recognized & is the foremost 
festival for presenting new Irish films alongside cutting edge 
int'l cinema. Last year over 30 Irish & int'l filmmakers were 
present w/ their films as well as a comrehensive selection of 
int'l critics from Variety, Film Comment & other publications. 
Awards: Best Irish short, best first short, best doc, best ani- 
mation (all must be directed by Irish filmmakers) & best 
director of first feature. Entry fee: $10. Formats: 35mm, 
16mm, Beta-SR VHS. Preview on VHS. Contact: Galway Film 
Fleadh, Guam Mhuire, Monivea Rd., Galway, Ireland; Oil 
353 91 751655; fax: 353 91 770746; gafleadh@iol.ie ; www. 
ireland.iol.ie/~galfilm/fleadh 

IBC WIDESCREEN FESTIVAL, Sept. 10-14, Netherlands. 
Deadline: June 4. Fest celebrates creative & technical excel- 
lence in all genres of widescreen program making. Festival is 
held as part of IBC — the Int'l Broadcasting Convention, the 
largest broadcast technology & electronic media event held 
outside the US, which attracts over 35,000 visitors annually 
from over 120 countries. Festival is open to all genres of tele- 
vision programs but entries must have been completed after 
Jan. 1, 1998 & must have been broadcast or have a pending 
broadcast date. Awards: Golden Rembrandt for best overall 
program & Silver Rembrandt for best runner-up; craft awards 



46 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



avail, as well. Entries accepted on VHS (PAL & NTSC); sub- 
mit widescreen copies. VHS acceptable for nomination stage 
but nominated programs will have to be submitted in Beta SP 
or Digibeta. Entry fees: Free to enter a program, but if accept- 
ed for the festival a charge of $156 will be levied. Contact: 
IBCWF, Jarlath O'Connell, Festival Co-ordmator, Le Nombre 
d'Or Awards, Int'l Broadcasting Convention, IBC Office, 
Savoy Place, London, WC2R OBL, England; Oil 44 171 344- 
5470; fax: 44 171 240 8830; joconnell@ibc.org.uk; 
www.ibc.org.uk/ibc 

MONTREAL INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF NEW CINEMA 
NEW MEDIA, Oct. 14-24, Canada. Deadline: May 1. Cats: 
feature, short & medium-length works, new media. All gen- 
res, all formats. Works must have been produced after Jan. 
1, 1998. All languages accepted w/ English or French 
(preferably) subtitles. Preview on VHS (NTSC, preferably, or 
PAL). Entry fee: $20 (subject to change). Contact: Claude 
Chamberlain, Director, MIFNCNM, 3668 Boul. Saint-Laurent, 
Montreal, Quebec, H2X 2V4, Canada; (514) 843-4725; fax: 
843-4631; montrealfest@fcmm.com; www.fcmm.com 

VIDEOART LOCARNO INTERNATIONAL VIDEO & ELEC- 
TRONIC ART FESTIVAL Dec, Switzerland. Deadline for 
VideoArt competition: June. Founded in 1980 annual festival, 
programs VideoArt, video-installations, multimedia shows, 
colloquium. Described as place "where artists, critics & 
philosophers meet to have a point to discuss the state of the 
evolution between arts & technologies." Competition accepts 
works produced after June of preceding yr & unawarded in 
other tests. Competition criteria incl. any work that falls 
under the heading "video art" where "artistic research & 
creativity overshadow both technical means employed & ref- 
erence category chosen by the artist." Awards: Grand Prix del 
la Ville de Locarno (cash prize divided between Art Video & 
Installations: 15.000FRS), UNESCO & Conseil de I'Europe 
Award (2 grants to honor new talent), Three Laser d'Or 
Awards (to artists, theorists &/or institutions), Artronic, TV 
Picture, World Graph, Prix Lagomaggiore. About 60 prods 
showcased annually. Formats: 3/4", 1/2". Entry fee: none. 
Contact: VideoArt Festival AIVAC via Varenna 45 Box 146, 
CH-6604, Locarno, Switzerland; Oil 41 751 22 08; fax: 41 
751 22 07; avart@tinet.ch; www.tinet.ch/videoart 

SAO PAULO INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM FESTIVAL, Aug. 
19-28, Brazil. Deadline; May 30. Founded in 1990, having a 
cultural & noncompetitive section, the festival is the leading 
event for the short format in Latin America. Its aims are to 
exhibit short films produced in Brazil, Latin American films 
as well as int'l films that may contribute to the development 
of the short film concerning its language specific shape & 
way of production. Festival features: Brazilian Panorama, 
Latin American & Int'l Showcase sections. Entries should 
have a maximum running time of 35 min. All genres accept- 
ed. Film must have been produced in 1998/9. Formats: 
35mm, 16mm. No entry fee. Contact: Zita Carvalhosa, 
Festival Director. SPISFF, Associacao Cultural Kinoforum, Rua 
Simao Alvarez, 784/2, 05417 020, Sao Paulo-SR Brazil; 
tel/fax: Oil 55 11 852 9601; spshort@ibm.net; www. 
estacao.ignet.com.br/kinoforum/saoshortfest 



L M S 




512.471.6497 

fax 512.471.4077 

email cinematx@uts.cc.utexas.edu 

web http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/-cinematx 



1999 Call for Entries 




FIL7NA FESTIVAL 

Iftk Annual Fill/Video (estiva 

Staller Center for the Arts/Stony Brook & 

Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center 

May 20th-July 30th, 1999 

Call or Write for Entry Forms (Due 4/1/99) 

Christopher Cooke, Director 

Long Island Film Festival 

c/o P.O. Box 13243 

Hauppauge, NY 11788 

1-800-762-4769 . (516) 853-4800 

From 10:00am-6pm, Mon-Fri 

or visit our website at www.lifilm.org 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 47 



notices of relevance to aivf members are list- 
ed free of charge as space permits. the 
independent reserves the right to edit for 
length and makes no guarantees about the 
number of placements for a given notice. limit 
submissions to 60 words & indicate how long 
info will be current. deadline: 1st of the 
month, two months prior to cover date (e.g., 
april 1 for june issue). complete contact info 
(name, address & phone) must accompany all 
notices. send to: independent notices, fivf, 304 
hudson st., 6th fl, ny, ny 10013. we try to be as 
current as possible, but double-check before 
submitting tapes or applications. 

Competitions 

BAY AREA VIDEO COALITION announces 1999 Artist 
Equipment Access Awards call for entries, in postproduction 
grants for innovative video or new media projects. Every year, 
BAVC awards multiple grants of $1,500 worth of access to 
BAVC's media facility which include linear & nonlinear video 
editing equipment, Windows NT & Macintosh computer labs, 
closed/open captioning services & video preservation center. 
BAVC takes special interest in video artists who are working 
on projects in association w/ community groups or about 
community issues. Deadline: Apr. 30. Contact: Natasha 
Perlis, (415) 558-2119: www.bavc.org 

BUCK HENRY SCREENWRITING SCHOLARSHIP: Two $500 
scholarships to support work of students enrolled in screen- 



1. Contact: OIFF, 2258 West 10th St., #5, Cleveland, OH 
44113; (216) 781-1755; OhiolndiefilmFest@juno.com; 
www.rinestock.com/flickfest 



Conferences 



Workshops 



AVID FEATURE FILM CAMP & Avid Short Film Camp : Digital 
Media accepting submissions for its 1999 Filmcamps. 
Filmcamp offers free nonlinear postproduction on feature 
films & shorts. Editors-in-training, under supervision of an 
experienced feature editor, learn postproduction on multiple 
Avid Media Composers while editing your film. 13 features & 
4 shorts will be accepted before the end of 1999. Principal 
photography & transfer must be completed on feature-length 
film (70+ min.) or short (under 70 min.). Can be doc, nar- 
rative or experimental. Contact: Jaime Fowler, AFFC director. 
(503) 297-2324; www.filmcamp.com 

BAVC offers workshops & seminars in areas of video & mul- 
timedia production & postprod. For list, contact BAVC: (415) 
558-2126; www.bavc.org 

CINESTORY NATIONAL SCREENWRITING CENTER kicks off 
its 4th annual Script Session in San Francisco, June 4-6. 
Sponsored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences 
Foundation, San Francisco State Univ. Dept. of Cinema & 
Film Arts Foundation, the conference fuses industry profes- 
sionals w/ emerging writers in an intimate 10:1 ratio via 
round table discussions, one-on-ones & the green room, 
where registrants chat casually w/ pros. Contact: Cinestory, 





NEXT WAVE FILMS 



Known for providing completion funds 
to feature films, IFC's Next Wave Films 
[www.nextwavefilms.com] is expanding with a new digital film division. 
Entitled Agenda 2000, it will finance and produce digital films; some will 
presumably have their premieres on the Independent Film Channel. 
Structured differently than the Next Wave Film's general completion 
funds, Agenda 2000 has an ongoing deadline, no limit on financial sup- 
port, and a comprehensive on-line digital resource guide. [See listing] 



ffffl 



(800) 6-ST0RY-6; www. 
cinestory.com 



writing course of study. Sold or optioned scripts ineligible. 
Contact: American Film Institute (213) 856-7690; 
www.afionline.org 

F.O.C.U.S. INSTITUTE OF FILM call for screenplays: "original, 
compelling human stories that promote positive values & 
social responsibility — material that endeavors to stir the 
human spirit." 2-5 screenwriters selected for mentorship 
program & one script will go into production. Proceeds from 
release of films produced by F.O.C.U.S. will est. academic & 
vocational scholarship funds for underprivileged foster chil- 
dren. Deadline: June 1. Info & applic. materials avail, by fax- 
ing name, address & tel. no. to: (310) 472-1481 or at 
www.focusmstituteoffilm.com 

OHIO INDEPENDENT SCREENPLAY AWARDS: Call for entries 
for Best Screenplay Award & Best Northcoast Screenplay 
Awards. All genres accepted. Prizes incl. $1,000. a screen- 
play reading at the Ohio IFF in Nov., submission to a LA liter- 
ary agent, screenwriting software & industry script analysis. 
Entry fee: $40 per screenplay. Deadline: Postmarked by June 



INDEPENDENT TELEVI- 
SION SERVICE considers 
proposals for new, innova- 
tive programs & limited 
series for public TV on an 
on-going basis. No finished works. Contact: ITVS, 51 Federal 
St., Ste 401, San Francisco. CA 94107; (415) 356-8383; 
www.itvs.org 

MARK LITWAK, attorney & author of Reel Power & 
Dealmaking in the Film & Television Industry presents a 
seminar on Financing Independent Features at the New 
School for Social Research on Apr. 3. Contact: New School for 
Social Research, 65 5th Ave., New York, NY 10011, (212) 
229-5620; fax: 229-5648. 

Films • Tapes 

AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE is accepting entries for its on- 
going program, The Alternative Screen: A Forum for 
Independent Film Exhibition & Beyond. Send submissions on 
1/2" VHS tape. Feature-length independent film, doc & new 
media projects wanted. 1800 N. Highland, Ste 717, LA., CA 
90028. For more info, call (213) 466-FILM. 

ARC GALLERY reviewing for solo & group exhibitions. All 



media incl. video, performance & film. Send SASE for 
prospectus to: ARC Gallery, 1040 W. Huron, Chicago, IL 
60622 or call (312) 733-2787. 

ASHLAND CABLE ACCESS seeks video shows. VHS. S-VHS & 
3/4" OK. any length or genre. For return, incl. sufficient SASE. 
Send w/ description & release to: Suzi Aufderheide, Southern 
Oregon State College, RVTV, 1250 Siskiyou Blvd., Ashland. OR 
97520; (541) 552-6898. 

THE BIT SCREEN premieres original short films, videos & 
multimedia works made specifically for Internet. We're look- 
ing for original films scaled in both plot line & screen ratio for 
Internet, that challenge assumption of bandwidth limitations. 
Want to define the look of a new medium 7 For submission 
guidelines check out: www.lnPhiladelphia.com/TheBitScreen 

BLACKCHAIR PRODUCTIONS, in its 4th year, is accepting 
video, film, computer-art submissions on an on-going basis for 
monthly screening program called "Independent Exposure." 
Artists will be paid honorarium. Looking for experimental, dra- 
matic, narrative, animation, but will review anything for a pos- 
sible screening. Submit a VHS (or S-VHS), clearly labeled w/ 
name, title, length, phone number along w/ any support mate- 
rials, incl. photos. Incl. $5 entry fee which will be returned if 
work not selected; SASE if you wish work(s) to be returned. 
Send submissions to: Blackchair Prod., 2318 2nd Ave., #313- 
A, Seattle, WA 98121. Info/details: (206) 568-6051; 
joel@speakeasy.org; www.speakeasy.org/blackchair 

CINELINGUA SOCIETY seeks short & feature-length 
European films on video for language project, preferably 
without subtitles. We desire only limited rights. Contact: 
Brian Nardone, Box 8892, Aspen, CO 81612; (970) 925- 
2805; fax: 925-9880; briann@rof.net; www.rof.net/ 
yp/cinelingua.html 

DOBOY'S DOZENS: Monthly showcase w/ up to 350 industry 
attendees seeks short films for highlighting works by up-S- 
corning filmmakers. Contact: Eugene Williams/Marceil Wright, 
Doboy's Dozens, 1525 N. Cahuonga Blvd. #39, Hollywood, CA 
90028; (213) 293-6544; doboydozen@aol.com 

DOCUMENTAL: doc. & exp. bimonthly film video series at 
LA's historic Midnight Special bookstore, accepting entries of 
any length. Contact: Gerry Fialka, (310) 306-7330. 

DUTV-CABLE 54, a progressive, nonprofit access channel in 
Philadelphia, seeks works by indie producers. All genres & 
lengths. No payment. Will return tapes. VHS, S-VHS, & 3/4" 
accepted. Contact: George McCollough or Debbie Rudman, 
DUTV-Cable 54, 3141 Chestnut St., Bldg 9B, Rm 4026, 
Philadelphia, PA 19104; (215) 895-2927; dutv@post. 
drexel.edu; www.httpsrv.ocs.drexel.edu/~dutv/ 

EXHIBITION OPPORTUNITIES for the 99-00 exhibition sea- 
son. All media considered incl. 2-D, 3-D, performance, video, 
& computer art. Send resume, 20 slides or comparable doc- 
umentation & SASE to: University Art Gallery, Wightman 132, 
Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Ml 48858. 

FINISHING PICTURES accepting shorts & works-m-progress 
seeking distribution or exposure to financial resources for 
CLIPS, a quarterly showcase presented to invited audience of 
industry professionals. Deadline: On-going. Contact: 
Tommaso Fiacchino, (212) 971-5846. 

FLOATING IMAGE seeks film/video animation & shorts for 



48 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



public/commercial TV program. Send VHS or S-VHS to 

Floating Image Productions, Box 7017, Santa Monica, CA 

90406 (incl. SASE for return). (310) 313-6935; www. 
artnet.net/~floatingimage 

KINOFIST IMAGEWORKS seeks work w/ relevance to alter- 
native youth culture for screening & distribution within 
underground community. DIY, exp. & activist work encour- 
aged. Send VHS, SASE to Kinofist Imageworks, Box 1102, 
Columbia, MO 65205; dmwF92@hamp.hampshire.edu 

KNITTING FACTORY VIDEO LOUNGE seeks VHS tapes for on- 
going bi-weekly series. Any genre or subject. Send tape w/ 
brief bio & SASE to: Knitting Factory Video Lounge, Box 1220 
Canal St. Station, New York, NY 10013. Info: kf_vl@ 
hotmail.com 

MEDIASPACE AT DECORDOVA ARCHIVE: DeCordova 
Museum & Sculpture Park seeks VHS copies of video art & 
documentation of performance, installation art & new genres 
from New England artists for inclusion in new media arts 
archive. Contact: George Fifield, Mediaspace at DeCordova, 
DeCordova Museum, 51 Sandy Pond Rd„ Lincoln, MA 01773- 
2600. 

MIRROR, MIRROR, ON THE SCREEN seeks submissions of 
re-edited Hollywood or independent shorts for May exhibition 
of works which explore identification w/ & representation of 
onscreen characters. All participants will receive a small 
honorarium. Send VHS & SASE. Deadline: Apr. 20. Contact: 
Liss Piatt, c/o Visual Arts Department, Mason Gross School 
of the Arts, Rutgers University, 33 Livingston Ave., New 
Brunswick, NJ 08901; lissplatt@thorn.net 

NEW YORK FILM BUFFS: Film society promoting indie films 
seeks 16mm & 35mm features, shorts & animation for on- 
going opinion-maker screenings during fall & winter seasons. 
Send submission on VHS tape w/ SASE & $25 administrative 
fee to: New York Film Buffs, 318 W. 15th St., New York, NY 
10011; (212) 807-0126. 

OCULARIS seeks submissions from indie filmmakers for our 
continuing series. Works under 15 min. long will be consid- 
ered for Sunday night screenings where they precede that 
evening's feature film, together w/ a brief Q&A w/ audience. 
Works longer than 15 mins will be considered for the regular 
group shows of indie filmmakers. We only show works on 
16mm w/ an optical track. Please send all films, together w/ 
completed entry form (download from website) to: Short Film 
Curator, Ocularis, Galapagos Art & Performance Space, 70 N. 
6th St., Brooklyn, NY 11211; tel/fax (718) 388-8713; 
ocularis@billburg.com; www.billburg.com/ocularis 

PARTNERSHIP FOR JEWISH LIFE introduces an on-going 
series showcasing emerging Jewish filmmakers' work at 
MAKOR, a place for New Yorkers in their 20s & 30s. Now 
accepting shorts, features, docs &/or works-in-progress on 
any theme for screening consideration & network building. 
PJL's film program is sponsored by Steven Spielberg's 
Righteous Persons Foundation. Contact: Ken Sherman at 
(212) 792-6286 or kensherman@makor.org 

PERIPHERAL PRODUCE, presented by Rodeo FilmCo., is 
Portland-based roving showcase & distr. co-op for exp & 
underground film/video. Curated shows exhibited bi-monthly. 
Formats: 16mm, VHS. $5 entry fee. Contact: Peripheral 
Produce, Rodeo FilmCo., Box 40835, Portland, OR 97240; 



NEW DAY FILMS is the premiere distrib- 
ution cooperative for social issue media. 
Owned and run by its members, New 
Day Films has successfully distributed 
documentary film and video for twenty- 
five years. 

Call 415.332.7172 


Seeking energetic 
independent makers 
of social issue 
documentaries for 
new membership. 


http:/ /www. newday.com 





Finding Stock Footage 



with a process which is 

pleasurable, productive, 

and even inspiring 





ENERGY 



1. 800. IMAGERY | conadal.800.361.3456 
www.digital-energy.com| Fuel lor Thought. 



June 15th, 1999 

ROSARITO BEACH, 
BAJA CALIFORNIA 



I Ik* m lining location of ihr movie epic, "fl I ANK 



1ST PRIZE $2,000 flus 
2ND PRIZE $1,000 />/"-< 
3RD PRIZE $500 pfus 



FOR INFORMATION & APPLICATION 
Send S.A.S.E. to our U.S. Border address 

BISC 

P.O.Box 439030 

SanYsidro, CA 92143 

(619) 615-9977 



Serving independent filmmakers for 15 years, 
Solar is dedicated to bringing the highest quality, 
full-service post-production support to your project. 
We combine top of the line facilities with highly- 
experienced, creative Editors, Mixers, and Tech Support. 



Avid 8000s and 400s 

Film Composers 

AVR77 

AfterEffects Compositing 



ProTools 24 Mix Plus 
ADR, Voice Over 
Foley Recording 
Duplications 



Sol ar Film/V i d e o Pro ductio ns 



212.473.3040 



632 Broadway NYC 10012 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 49 



NOTICES 




STUDENTS: CALL FOR ENTRIES 

How is POPULATION GROWTH affecting 

CONSUMPTION • ENVIRONMENT • SUSTAINABILITY 

$10,000 IN PRIZES 

NO ENTRY FEE 

TV EXPOSURE* NATIONAL TOUR 

For more information, a resource guide and 
a copy of the video Best of Festival , contact: 
WPFVF • 46 Fox Hill Road, Bernardston, MA 

01 337 • TL: 800 638-9464 • FX: 41 3 648-9204 

eM: info@wpfvf.conn • www.wpfvf.com 

Sponsored by Sopris Foundation, Searchlight 

Films & Population Communications International 



TRULY MODERN 




• AATON XTRprod SUPER 16/16mm 

• ARRI SR2 16mm 

• SONY DVW-700 DIGITAL BETACAM 
WITH FILM-STYLE ACCESSORIES 

• SONY BVW-D600 BETACAM SP 

• STEADICAM PRO 

• 1 & 3-TON GRIP & LIGHTING / HMI'S 

• FIELD AUDIO FOR FILM & VIDEO 

• INDIE FRIENDLY-LOW WEEKLY RATES 



MQDERN M9UIE 

MACHINE! 



QUALITY PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT RENTALS 

281-561-7200 

888-569-7200 

mmm@insync.net 

www.modernmovie.com 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



mattmproduce@msn.com 

SHORT TV, a new NYC cable show (not public access) direct- 
ed to show & promote short films, is seeking submissions. 
Contact: Short TV, (212)226-6258. 

THE SYNC ONLINE FILM FEST The Net's first on-going film 
festival seeks short noncommercial indie films & videos. Web 
users can vote for their favorite shorts in each of six cats: 
animation, doc, experimental, less than a min., narrative, 
made for Net. New films are added each month & there are 
new winners every minute. Fest never ends. Filmmakers 
must own rights to all content, incl. music. Send VHS & entry 
forms (avail, at site) to Carla Cole, The Sync, 4431 Lehigh 
Rd., Ste. 301, College Park, MD 20740; info@thesync.com 

WORLD OF INSANITY looking for videos & films to air on local 
cable access channel, particularly anything odd, bizarre, 
funny, cool. Any length. One hr weekly show w/ videos followed 
by info on makers. Send VHS/S-VHS to: World of Insanity, Box 
954, Veneta, OR 97487; (541) 935-5538. 

WXXI Public TV's The Screening Room wants short 
films/videos, animation, art films & longer-length docs for pos- 
sible screenings on weekly primetime series. Topics are your 
choice, but should be suitable a general television audience. 
Submit on VHS. If chosen, a broadcast quality version will be 
required. Contact: (716) 258-0244; kmeyers@wxxi.org 

Publications 

IFFCON 99 transcripts are now avail. Topics discussed by 
financiers & producers include: "Myths & Realities of 
Domestic Financing" & "The New Digital Frontier" Send $45 
to IFFCON; 360 Ritch St.; San Francisco, CA 94107. For more 
info call (415) 281-9777. 

INDEPENDENT PRESS ASSOCIATION Save the Ideas 1 
Without independent sources of ideas & discussion, democ- 
racy & dissent cannot thrive. IPA works to nurture indie pub- 
lications committed to justice for all. Contact: IPA, 2390 
Mission St., #201, San Francisco, CA 94110-1836; (415) 
634-4401; indypress@indypress.org; www.indypress.org 

MEDIA MATTERS: Media Alliance's newsletter, provides 
comprehensive listings of New York area events & opportuni- 
ties for media artists. For free copy, call Media Alliance at 
(212) 560-2919; www.mediaalliance.org 

THE SQUEALER Quarterly journal produced by Squeaky 
Wheel puts upstate NY spin on media-related subjects. Once 
a year The Squealer publishes "State of the State," a com- 
prehensive resource issue w/ detailed info on upstate media 
arts organizations, access centers, schools & coalitions. 
Subscriptions: $15/year. Contact: Andrea Mancuso, Squeaky 
Wheel, 175 Elmwood Ave., Buffalo, NY 14201; http : // 
freenet.buffalo.edu. -wheel/ 

Resources • Funds 

BAVC OPENS JOB RESOURCE CENTER: Funded by San 
Francisco Mayor's Office of Community Development, the Job 
Resource Center provides San Fran residents w/ free access 
to info & resources pertaining to video & new media industries. 
Internet access avail, for online job searches, industry publi- 



cations, career development, books & job/internship listings. 
Open Mon.-Fri. 12-6 p.m. BAVC, 2727 Mariposa St , 2nd fl., 
San Francisco, CA 94110; (415) 861-3282; www.bavc/org 

CALIFORNIA ARTS COUNCIL offers various grants & pro- 
grams for film & mediamakers. Contact: California Arts 
Council, 1300 I St., Ste. 930, Sacramento, CA 95814; (916) 
322-6555; (800) 201-6201; fax: (916) 322-6575; cac@ 
cwo.com; www.cac.ca.gov 

CITIZEN CINEMA, INC., 501(c)(3), nonprofit arts education 
organization dedicated to promoting the art of filmmaking, is 
planning to establish filmmaking workshops in high schools 
& is looking for donations of used 16mm cameras, sound, 
lighting & editing equip, in good working order. Donations of 
equipment gratefully accepted & tax deductible. Contact: Dan 
Blanchfield, Executive Director, (201) 444-9875. 

FUND FOR JEWISH DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING offers 
grants from $5,000-$50,000 for production/completion of 
original films & videos that interpret Jewish history, culture & 
identity to diverse public audiences. Applicants must be US 
citizens or permanent residents. Priority given to works-in- 
progress that address critical issues, combine artistry & 
intellectual clarity, can be completed within one yr of award, 
& have broadcast potential. Deadline: Apr. 6. Contact: Natl 
Foundation for Jewish Culture, 330 7th Ave., 12th fl., New 
York, NY 10001. (212) 629-0500 x. 205. 

LATINO PUBLIC BROADCASTING PROJECT (interim replace- 
ment for the National Latino Communications Center) is now 
accepting funding requests. Independent producers or pro- 
duction entities of Latino origin which are creating their pro- 
posed programs on an independent basis (no funding from a 
film studio or public/commercial broadcast entity, whether 
on a for-hire, commission or employment basis) are eligible 
to apply. Looking for television programs such as drama, doc, 
comedy, satire, animation, experimental works or innovative 
combinations either as single programs, limited series, new 
productions, or works-in-progress. Especially interested in 
projects that provoke thoughtful dialogue & impact on how 
the general public understands & interprets the Latino 
American experience. You may submit only one appl., for one 
program or series, per review period. A limited number of 
applicants will be asked to submit additional support mater- 
ial for Phase II. Submissions must be received by May 4. 
Contact: LPBP 6777 Hollywood Blvd., Ste. 501, Los Angeles, 
CA 90028; (323) 466-7110; www.cpb.org/library/mconsortia/; 
www.latinofilm.org 

MATCHING GRANT FOR RESTORATION offered by VidiPax. 
VidiPax will match 20% of funding received from govt., foun- 
dation or corporate funding agency. Individual artists need 
non-profit fiscal sponsorship to apply. Video & audiotape 
restoration must be performed at VidiPax. Contact: Dara 
Meyers-Kingsley, (212) 563-1999 x. 111. 

NEW DAY FILMS: premier distribution cooperative for social 
issue media, seeks energetic independent film & videomak- 
ers w/ challenging social issue documentaries for distr. to 
nontheatrical markets. Now accepting applications for new 
membership. Contact: New Day Films, 22D Hollywood Ave., 
Ho-Ho-Kus, NJ 07423; (201) 332-7172; www.newday.com 

NEXT WAVE FILMS, funded by Independent Film Channel, 
was est. to help exceptionally talented filmmakers launch 



50 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



their careers. In addition to furnishing finishing funds, com- 
pany also helps implement festival & press strategies, serves 
as a producer's rep & assists in finding financing for film- 
makers' next films. Contact company before production & 
then apply for finishing funds w/ rough cut. Contact: Tara 
Veneruso/Mark Stolaroff, Next Wave Films, 2510 7th St., Ste. 
E, Santa Monica, CA 90405; (310) 392-1720; launch® 
nextwavefilms.com 

OPEN DOOR COMPLETION FUND: Natl Asian American 
Telecommunications Association (NAATA) offers completion 
funding for projects in final stages of postproduction, w/ 
awards averaging $40,000. Works should present fresh & 
provocative takes on contemporary Asian American & Asian 
issues, have strong potential for public TV & be of standard 
TV lengths (i.e., 1 hr). Contact: NAATA Media Fund, 346 9th 
St., 2nd fl., San Francisco, CA 94103; (415) 863-0814; fax: 
863-7428; mediafund@naatanet.org; www.naatanet.org 

OPPENHEIMER CAMERA: new filmmaker grant program 
offers access to professional 16mm camera system for first 
serious new productions in dramatic, doc, exp. or narrative 
form. Purely commercial projects not considered. Provides 
camera on year-round basis. No application deadline, but 
allow 10 week minimum for processing. Contact: Dana 
Meaux, Oppenheimer Camera, 666 S. Plummer St., Seattle, WA 
98134; (206) 467-8666; fax: 467-9165; dana@ 
oppenheimercamera.com 

PACIFIC PIONEER FUND offered by Film Arts Foundation to 
doc filmmakers living in California, Oregon & Washington. 
Limited to organizations certified as public charities which 
control selection of individual recipients & supervise their 
projects. Grants range from $l,000-$8,000 w/ approx. 
$75,000 awarded annually. For proposal summary sheet, 
send SASE to: Film Arts Foundation, 346 Ninth St., 2nd fl., 
San Francisco, CA 94103, or call: (415) 454-1133. 

PANAVISION'S NEW FILMMAKER PROGRAM provides 
16mm camera pkgs. to short, nonprofit film projects of any 
genre, incl. student thesis films. Send SASE to: Kelly 
Simpson, New Filmmaker Program, Panavision, 6219 DeSoto 
Ave., Woodland Hills, CA 91367-2602. 

PEN WRITER'S FUND & PEN FUND FOR WRITERS & EDI- 
TORS WITH AIDS. Emergency funds, in form of small grants 
given each year to over 200 professional literary writers, incl. 
screenwriters, facing financial crisis. PEN's emergency funds 
are not intended to subsidize writing projects or professional 
development. Contact: PEN American Center, 568 Broadway, 
New York, NY 10012-3225; (212) 334-1660. 

UNIVERSITY FILM & VIDEO ASSOCIATION: Student grants 
avail, for research & productions in following categories: nar- 
rative, doc & experimental/animation/multimedia. Deadline: 
Jan. 1, 2000. Contact: www.ufva.org (click on grants). 



AIVF MEMBERS: 
SEND US YOUR EMAIL! 

aivf is collecting email addresses 

to better inform you of upcoming 

events and membership matters. 

Send to: members@aivf.org 




AVID EDIT SUITES 

OFFLINE/ON LINE/3DFX 

Grafix Suite /After Effects 
Audio Design/Mixing/Protools 
V.O. Booth /Read To Picture 



VOICE 



1D4 WEST Z9TH ST NY 1DDD1 



212.244.0744 



212.244.0690 




Avid MC9000, MCIOOO 

Film Composer, Xpress Plus 

off/on-line AVR77 & 3D DVE 

Digital Betacam, Digital I/O 

DVCPRO, 3/4 SP, HIS S VHS V I D 

transfers & duplication Crush available] 

Macintosh graphics & After Effects compositing 
tape to disk (Jazz, Zip, Syquest, CD-R] 
web site design & maintenance 

Betacam SP & DV field packages 

offering special ra-^es fcf ar-ijs't.s and ind< pendents since 1 tch 

212.529.82D4 

DV8VIDE0 / 738 BHORDUHV / PENTHOUSE / H V C 10003 




rirf 



Mini-DV and DVCAM dubs to BETA 

...at prices independent 
filmmakers can afford 



212-765-0600 Lichtenstein Creative Media 

1600 Broadway Suite 601 New York, M.Y. 10019 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 51 



&ASSIFIEDS 



CONTACT: [scott@aivf.org] DEADLINES: 1ST OF EACH 
MONTH, 2 MONTHS PRIOR TO COVER DATE (E.G. APRIL 
1 FOR JUNE ISSUE). CLASSIFIEDS OF UP TO 240 CHAR- 
ACTERS (INCL. SPACES & PUNCTUATION) COST 
$25/ISSUE FOR AIVF MEMBERS, $35 FOR NONMEM- 
3ERS; 240-480 CHARACTERS COST $45/ISSUE FOR 
AIVF MEMBERS, $65 FOR NONMEMBERS.; 480-720 
CHARACTERS COST $60/ISSUE FOR AIVF MEMBERS, 
$90 FOR NONMEMBERS. INCLUDE VALID MEMBER 
ID#. ADS EXCEEDING REQUESTED LENGTH WILL BE 
EDITED. ALL COPY SHOULD BE TYPED AND ACCOMPA- 
NIED BY A CHECK OR MONEY ORDER PAYABLE TO: FIVF, 
304 HUDSON ST., 6TH FL, NY, NY 10013. TO PAY BY 
CREDIT CARD, INCLUDE: CARD TYPE (VISA/MC); CARD 
NUMBER; NAME ON CARD; EXPIRATION DATE; BILLING 
ADDRESS & DAYTIME PHONE. ADS RUNNING 5 + 
TIMES RECEIVE A $5 DISCOUNT PER ISSUE. 



Buy • Rent • Sell 

1999 MEDIAMAKER HANDBOOK: The essential resource for 
making independent film, video & new media. Completely 
up-to-date for 1999, the Handbook includes listings of film 
festivals, distributors, screenplay competitions, exhibition 
venues, media arts funders, film and video schools, broad- 
cast venues & other resources. Contact: Bay Area Video 
Coalition, 2727 Mariposa St., San Francisco, CA 94110; 
(415) 861-3282; fax: 861-3282; bavc@bavc.org 

EMOTIONAL MASTURBATION: collection of 4 award-winning 
short films; provocative visual poetry, VHS. $15 check/m.o. 
to Gothic Prod., 3145 Geary Blvd., Box 405. San Francisco, 
CA 94118. Info: www.netlingo.com/gothic 

FOR RENT: Sony DCR-VX1000 3-chip digital camera. Also 
available: mic, light & tripod. Negotiable rates for both short 
& long-term rentals. Call (718) 284-2645. 

GUERILLAQUIP Light & Grip equipment rental. Mole- 
Richardson, Arri, Lowell; complete light & grip packages & 
light kits for the true low-budget indie filmmaker Our prices 
will help you get it in the can! (212) 252-2485; gonllaquip® 
smartweb.net 

MINT CONDITION Postproduction equip, packages for sale: 
Lightworks "Heavyworks system" film editorial (2) 20" Sony 
monitors, (8) nine gig drives (4 are new Seagate drives), 19" 
Sony NTSC monitor, HD rolling metal racks, custom bundled 
& labeled cabling. • Pro Tools Sound Mix (8 channel) v 4.0 
PCI 135 MHz. 64 Mb ram. 9 gig drive, D10 DAT w/TC Board. 
CD player w/ effects library, celestion/velodyne speakers. 
DA-88, Sprint Folio Board, Zip. Jaz, VSD. CD burner, HD rolling 
racks, Alesis M 500 amp, custom bundled cables. • Media 
100 Video & Graphics station, PCI 132 MHz Power Mac, 144 
Mb ram, 300 Kb frame resolution, 2x9 gig Raid Array, 20" 
Sony monitor, Mackie mixer, Roland speakers, After Effects. 
PhotoShop, Quark & more software, Arcus II bed scanner All 
3 systems avail, for working inspection. Provide your own 
technical operator/consultant. Call (212) 414-0736 for 
appointment. 

SOHO AUDIO RENTALS: Time code DATs, RF diversity mics, 
playback systems, pkgs. Great rates, great equipment & 
great service. Discounts for AIVF members. Larry (212) 226- 
2429; lloewinger@earthlink.net 



SOUND CREW & EQUIPMENT FOR RENT Need a reliable 
sound recorder & boom operator for high quality recordings 
w/ modern equipment? We have qualified staff, Sony DAT 
recorders, Nagras & Sennheiser mics. Competitive rates. 
Reductions for low budgets. Laterna equipment (718) 965- 
3885. 

VIDEO DECKS/EDIT SYSTEMS/CAMERAS FOR RENT: I 

Deliver! All types/best prices: Beta-SP Deck (Sony UVW- 
1800) $150/day, $450/week. S-VHS offline edit system 
$350/week. Sony DVCAM 3-chip camera $200/day. Lights, 
mics & mixers. David (212) 362-1056. 



Distribution 

16 YEARS AS AN INDUSTRY LEADER' Distributor of award- 
winning video on healthcare, mental health, disability & 
related issues invites new work. Fanlight Productions, 4196 
Washington St., Ste. 2, Boston, MA 02131; (800) 937-4113; 
www.fanlight.com 

A+ DISTRIBUTOR since 1985 invites producers to submit 
quality programs on VHS w/ SASE for distributor considera- 
tion. Mail to Chip Taylor Communications; 15 Spollett Dr., 
Derry, NH 03038; www.chiptaylor.com 

AQUARIUS HEALTH CARE VIDEOS: Leading distributor of 
outstanding videos because of outstanding producers. Join 
our collection of titles on disabilities, mental health, aging, 
nursing, psychosocial issues, children & teen issues. For 
educational/health markets. Leslie Kussmann, 5 
Powderhouse Lane, Sherbom, MA 01770; (508) 651-2963; 
www.aquariusproductions.com 

ATA TRADING CORP., actively & successfully distributing 
independent products for over 50 yrs., seeks new program- 
ming of all types for worldwide distribution into all markets. 
Contact: (212) 594-6460; fax: 594-6461. 

ATOMFILMS is a new, innovative, short-film distribution 
company seeking high-quality short films in all genres (30 
minutes or less) to distribute to broadcast and cable TV, 
home video, DVD, Internet, hospitality & other major markets. 
Films must have all clearances and rights for commercial 
distribution. Submissions on VHS (NTSC, PAL, SECAM): 
AtomFilms Acquisitions. 80 S. Washington, Suite 303, 
Seattle, WA 98104; information@atomfilms.com; www. 
atomfilms.com 

LOOKING FOR AN EDUCATIONAL DISTRIBUTOR 7 Consider 
the University of California. We can put 80 years of success- 
ful marketing expertise to work for you. Kate Spohr: (510) 
643-2788 or www-cmil.unex.berkeley.edu/media/ 

SEEKING EDUCATIONAL VIDEOS on guidance issues such as 

violence, drug prevention & parenting for exclusive distribu- 
tion. Our marketing gives unequaled results. The Bureau for 
At-Risk Youth, Box 760, Plainview, NY 11803; (800) 99- 
YOUTHx. 210. 

THE CINEMA GUILD, leading film/video/multimedia distnb, 
seeks new doc, fiction, educational & animation programs for 
distribution. Send videocassett.es or discs for evaluation to: 
The Cinema Guild, 1697 Broadway, Ste 506, NY NY 10019; 
(212) 246-5522; TheCinemaG@aol.com. Ask for our 
Distribution Services brochure. 



Freelancers 

35MM/16MM PROD. PKG w/ cinematographer Complete 
studio truck w/ DP's own Arri 35BL, 16SR, HMIs, dolly, jib 
crane, lighting, grip, Nagra . . . more. Ideal 1-source for the 
low-budget feature! Call TOM today for booking. (201) 807- 
0155. 

AATON & DAT equipped team seek projects of interest. Years 
of experience include indie films, docs, commercials & 
b'cast. We have talent, experience, style & dedication for 
filmmaker w/ vision. (888) 699-8881; cinedirect@ 
hotmail.com 

AATON CAMERA PKG. Absolutely perfect for independent 
features. Top of the line XTR Prod w/ S16, time code video, 
the works! Exp DP w/ strong lighting & prod skills wants to 
collaborate in telling your story. Andy (212) 501-7862; 
circa@interport.net 

ACADEMY, EMMY NOMINATED producer/director/writer/edi- 
tor Hoop Dreams. 20 years expertise, all areas, fundraising 
to distribution: features, documentaries, theatrical, broad- 
cast/cable. Work 1 hr-1 yr Contact only if s.th. in cash. (773) 
278-8278; Fmfilm@aol.com 

ACCLAIMED & UNUSUAL instrumental band can provide 
music for your next project. Contact "Magonia" for demo: 
(781) 932-4677; boygirl@mediaone.net 

ACCOUNTANT/BOOKKEEPER/CONTROLLER: Experience in 
both corporate & nonprofit sectors. Hold MBA in Marketing & 
Accounting. Freelance work sought. Sam Sagenkahn (212) 
481-3576. 

ANDREW DUNN, Director of Photography/camera operator 
Arri35 BL3, Aaton XTRprod S16, Sony DVCAM. Experience in 
features, docs, TV & industrials. Credits: Dog Run, Strays, 
Working Space/Working Light. (212) 477-0172; AndrewD158 
@aol.com 

ARCHIVAL FILM RESEARCHER, highly regarded, compre- 
hensive archival film researcher avail, for doc projects, films, 
commercials & videos. References avail. Contact: Rosemary 
Rotondi; 799 Greenwich St., Loft Six S., NY, NY 10014; (212) 
989-2025; fax: 989-4607; RotondiResearch@onepine.com 
I will locate the footage you need, on schedule. 

AWARD-WINNING EDITOR, w/ Avid and Beta SP facility. 
Features, shorts, doc, music videos, educational, industrials, 
demos. Trilingual: Spanish, English, Catalan. (212) 627- 
9256. 

BETA-SP videographer w/ new Sony Betacam SR mics & 
lights. Very portable, lightweight & I'm fast. Experience 
includes: docs, interviews, industrials, fashion shows & 
comedy clubs. Please call John Kelleran (212) 334-3851. 

BETA SP VIDEOGRAPHER, skilled in everything from exterior 
hand-held to Rembrandt interior lighting styles, seeking 
interesting projects to shoot. Has attractive Sony Betacam 
SR cool sets of lights & sensitive microphones. Willing to 
travel. Yitzhak Gol (718) 591-2760. 

BRENDAN C. FLYNT Director of Photography w/ 15 feature 
credits & dozen shorts. Owns 35 Arri, Super 16/16 Aaton, 
HMIs, Tungsten, & dolly w/ tracks. Call for quotes & reel at 
tel/fax: (212) 226-8417; ela292@aol.com. Credits: Tromeo 



52 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



and Juliet, The Offering, Fine Young Gentlemen, Brush fire, 
www.dp-brendanflynt.com 

CAMERAPERSON: Visual storyteller loves to collaborate, 
explore diverse styles & formats. Brings passion & productiv- 
ity to your shoot. Award-winner w/ latest Super/ Std. 16 
Aaton XTR Prod, package. Todd (718) 222-9277; wacass® 
concentric.net 

CINEMATOGRAPHER w/ Aaton & lighting, looking forward to 
working w/ collaborative directors on: narratives, exp, docs, 
RS.A.S, music videos. Steven Gladstone (718) 625-0556 for 
new reel. VEENOTPH@aol.com 

COMPOSER for film/video, new media projects. Innovative 
sounds that won't strain your pocketbook. For a free demo & 
brochure, contact Progressive Media Arts at: (415) 550- 
7172; pma@progmedia.com; www.progmedia.com 

COMPOSER: David Majzlin has composed for award-winning 
directors, video games & dance companies. Fully digital 
recording studio. Free consultation & demos on request. 
(212) 838-0485; david@davidmusic.com; www. 
davidmusic.com 

COMPOSER: Affordable original music in any style that 
enhances the mood/message of your project. Save money 
without compromising creativity. Full service digital recording 
studio, Yale MM. FREE demo CD/intial consultation/rough 
sketch. Call Joe Rubenstein; (212) 242-2691; joe56@ 
earthlink.net 

COMPOSER: Original music for your film or video project. 
Credits include NYU film projects and CD. Will work with any 
budget. Complete digital studio. NYC area. Call Ian O'Brien: 
(201) 432-4705; iobrien@bellatlantic.net 

COMPOSER: Experienced, versatile composer avail, for scor- 
ing, sound design. Can meet all postproduction requirements. 
Video & audio reels avail. Cam Millar (212) 781-7737; 
Ccmillar@aol.com 

COMPOSER, 20 yrs experience in film, theater, dance. Well- 
known composer/performer & expert in World/Ethnic music 
styles. Call for CD incl. new symphony based on Hebraic 
theme. Bill Vanaver, Vanaver Caravan Prod. Inc., (914) 658- 
9748; vanaver@aol.com 

COMPOSER FOR FILM/TV: Academy Award winning. 
Broadcast: PBS, NBC, ABC, CBS. Highly experienced & dedi- 
cated. Music in all styles w/ an original touch. Complete dig- 
ital studio. Reasonable rates. Leonard Lionnet (212) 980- 
7689. 

DIGITAL VIDEO Videographer/D.P with Canon 3-CCD digital 
videocam; prefer documentaries; video-assist for films; doc- 
umentation for dance and performace; misc. projects. 
Reasonable. Alan Roth (718) 218-8065; 365892@ 
newschool.edu 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY with Arri SR II w/ tap, and 
Panavision filters, Sony Beta SR HMI's, Kino Flos, Jimmy Jib 
& grip truck. I make great pictures, work fast & have tons of 
experience. Call for reel: (203) 254-7370; page: (917) 824- 
3334. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY looking for interesting fea- 
tures, shorts, ind. projects, etc. Credits incl. features, com- 
mercials, industrials, short films, music videos. Aaton 16/S- 



SON VIDA PICTURES 

155 E 31 ST STREET 
SUITE #1 OH 




212 8891775 



Let's 


Make History 


At WPA, all we really 
think about is history. 




\^s^^1 British Pathe '\ 
ySy^^SI News Archive v 
■4^m £jjk. < 18 9 6 t° 197 °) 


And time. We're a film 






and video archive, and 








we act as custodians to 
the world's most cele- 






4^J 


^■W JT~~M WETA-TV |' 

Ammr L^ \ \ Public 


brated collections of 






^MmmB^mr mrnw^ ^ Television 
|E» m Amr Archive 


moving images. We 






^1 m fk 


provide historical i 
footage to television 
programs. Lots of it. Al 
of it wonderful to look 
at. But we also provide 


r 

I 


3 


^W^^JV ^X^^^^^^^^ ^mr The 






Sn'^H^m^ii wf^ ^^^Bw willie Nelson 

^K'"M|wVI ^^Bk. Archive of 
SrV-^V- " h^^^J ^^^ ^^k (1958 to 1984) 


ideas. And context. Anc 
a producer's sensibility. 


i 


^Ff 


mW m ^mW m ^m. 


1 % ^^\ * V 










When you work with 






WPA, you work with a 
remarkable team of his- 




mm The Hullabaloo 
mm ^L\ Archive of 
—W H Popular Culture 
km MM (1964to1966) 


torians and archivists, 






researchers and artists, 
movie buffs and rights 
specialists. We call 




k-W / * ^¥f ColorStock 
MkW 1 ^^^ \ Archive of Retro 
JmW i-^*"^\. \ Americana 
l MLW N| (1945 to 1975) 


ourselves Merchants of 






Time. Let's Work Together 
Let's Make History. 




^*s. ? \ 40,000 hours of history, 
rt " m music, nature, and 
V/*'***^^ popular culture 




The WPA Film Library 

Merchants of Time 


1-800-77 

16101 South 108th Avenue • Orlai 


A si* 

7-2223 


sijiiiry of the MP1 Mcjia Gump 

www.mpimedia.com/wpa 


L<H>! 


rk, 1L • 60467 


• 708-460-0555 . Fax: 708-460-0187 • Email: wpasales@mpimedia.com 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 53 



A VI DS TO GO 



Luna delivers. 




* 




free delivery and set-up in your home or office 

long term //short term rentals 
the most cost-effective way to cut your indie film 




PICTURES 



212 255 2564 



PMEnna 



KITCHEN 
CINEMA 




MEDIA nonlinear on-line 



editing suite 



Mil 

at affordable 

rates 

NTSC & PAL Beta SP 

63 £i£ MicroNet Data Dock 

Jazz Drive -Mackie 1402 Mixer 

After Effects 

Editors available 



149 5 th AVE • NYC 
212 253 9472 



BRAVO 

film/fcjavidep 




40 WEST 27TH STREET 

2ND FLOOR 

NEW YORK NY IOOOI 

212 679 9779 

FAX 212 532 O444 

wwwbravofilmcom 



Sound Stage Rentals 

34' x 28' x 14' 

600 amps 

Hard Cyc/Blue Screen 

$595/day 

On-line Editing 

DVCam, BetaSP, VC, S-VHS 

ABC Roll 

DVE: Pinnacle Alladin with many Effects 

Video Toaster 4.1 

S85/hour with Editor 

Production Packages 

Sony DVCam: 

DSR-130 $325 /day 

DSR-300 $225/day 

Audio Services 

ADR, voice-over recording 

$55/hour 

In-house Sound Design &C 

Scoring also available. 

Tel: 212 679 9779 Fax: 212 532 0444 



CLASSIFIEDS 



16 pkg avail. Abe (718) 263-0010. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: Award winning, exp, looking 
for interesting projects. Credits incl. features, docs & com- 
mercials in the U.S., Europe & Israel. Own complete Aaton 
Super 16 pkg & lights. Call Adam for reel. (212) 932-8255 or 
(917) 794-8226. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY w/ complete Arri-Zeiss 16mm 
pkg. Lots of indie film experience. Features, shorts and music 
videos. Save money and get a great looking film. Willing to 
travel. Rates are flexible and I work quickly. Matthew: (914) 
439-5459 or (617) 244-6730. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: 35mm, S16mm/16mm. 
Creative, experienced, award winning, w/ feature, ads, docs, 
music videos & industrial credits. Own Am SR 1 S16/16mm 
pkg w/ Zeiss lens, tungstens, sound pkg. LKB Prod.: (718) 
802-9874. 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY w/ own 35mm sync sound 
Arriflex BLII avail. Beautiful reel, affordable rates. Crew on 
standby. Work incl. several features, shorts, music videos. 
Travel no problem. Dave (718) 230-1207; page: (917) 953- 
1117 

DOCUCREW WEST: Award winning writer, producer, director 
w/ new Betacam (D-30) pkg.; Media 100 editing. Trilingual in 
English, Spanish & German. Let us help shape your project. 
Reasonable rates. Near San Diego. Mark (760) 630-7398. 

DOCUMENTARY TEAM wants new challenge. DP & mixer with 
decades of experience seek filmmakers with mission. Film & 
video packages avail. (888) 699-8881; docuteam@ 
hotmail.com 

DP w/ full postproduction support. Experienced film/video DP 
w/ 16:9 digital & 16mm film cameras, lighting/sound gear & 
complete nonlinear editing services. Call (212) 334-4778 Derek 
Wan, H.K.S.C. for reel & low "shoot & post" bundle rates. 

DP/EDITOR: Avid (AVR 77, Sony D-30 Beta SP or Aaton XTR 
package. Sound & lights. Edit suite w/ city view. Speak 
French, Spanish, Farsi. Commercial, doc & feature credits. 
Andre: (212) 367-3730 or (917) 873-7953. 

EDITOR W/ EQUIPMENT: Producer/director w/ 18 years 
experience in advertising & industrial work available for pro- 
jects. Just completed NEH historical doc for NYU. (212) 952- 
0848; Ruvn@aol.com 

EDITOR WITH AVID, 14 years experience, including 4 fea- 
tures. Full featured Avid MC1000 w/ AVRs 3-77, 3D DVE, 
Ultimatte & Film matchback. Low price package deals for 
independent projects. Contact Dan Lantz at (610) 337-3333. 

ENTERTAINMENT ATTORNEY: Former AIVF exec, dir and an 
ITVS founder offering legal & business services to indies at 
reasonable rates. Over 4 years experience as biz affairs exec, 
at NYC production/distribution companies. Contact Lawrence 
Sapadin: (718) 768-4142. 

ENTERTAINMENT ATTORNEY: frequent contributor to "Legal 
Brief" columns in Independent & other magazines offers 
legal services on projects from development to distribution. 
Reasonable rates. Robert L. Seigel, Esq.: (212) 307-7533. 

EXPERIENCED CINEMATOGRAPHER with crew and equip- 
ment. 16mm & 35mm. Short films and features. Vincent 
(212) 995-0573. 



54 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



FILM CONSULTANT: Award-winning writer director (PBS, 
MTV, feature credits) acquisitions executive for Infinity Films, 
offers advice to filmmakers, critiques scripts & films. 
Reasonable rates. Nick Taylor (212) 414-5441. 

INDIE RECORD LABEL: Do you need original soundtrack 
material for your independent film? Great tracks available 
from independent record label. Small budget 7 No budget? 
Let's discuss! Contact: NeveRecords: (718) 623-2660; 
amias@pobox.com 

INNOVATIVE EDITOR w/ Avid available for challenging pro- 
jects. Experienced in fiction features, commercials, music 
video & documentary. Reel available. Rodney (718) 246- 
8235. 

JOHN BASKO: Documentary cameraman w/ extensive inter- 
national Network experience. Civil wars in Beirut, El Salvador, 
Nicaragua, Tiananmen Square student uprising. Equipment 
maintained by Sony. (212) 727-7270; fax: 727-7736. 

LOCATION SOUND: Over 20 yrs sound exp. w/ time code 
Nagra & DAT, quality mics. Reduced rates for low-budget pro- 
jects. Harvey & Fred Edwards, (518) 677-5720; beeper (800) 
796-7363 (ext/pin 1021996); edfilms@worldnet.att.net 

SONY VX1000 DIGITAL CAMERA w/ cameraman. Kenko wide 
angle lens, Sennheiser ME 66 shotgun mic, boom, XLR 
adapter, pro tripod, 3 Bescor 4 hour batteries. $150/day. 
(212) 677-6652. 

SOUNDS LIKE a "cross between Steely Dan & Jackson 
Browne with some Frank Zappa humor thrown in." Good, 
short, varied, pop songs avail, for films. Will work with your 
budget. Boomer Music & Records. Toll free (877) 298-9953; 
Boomerrec@aol.com 

STEADICAM: Dolly smooth moves w/ the flexibility of a hand- 
held camera. Call Sergei Franklin (212) 228-4254. 

STEADICAM: Videographer creating dolly-like movements 
w/out heavy, cumbersome dolly equipment. Steadicam is 
able to strike lines w/ graceful curves. Avail, for all applica- 
tions. Vic Blandburg (703) 941-4497; Box 2254, Merrifield, 
VA 22116; photo8224@aol.com 

Opportunites • Gigs 

COLUMBIA COLLEGE CHICAGO invites applications for sev- 
eral full-time tenure-track teaching positions avail. Sept. 
1999 in large, production-oriented dept. Duties may incl. stu- 
dent advising, registration, departmental & college commit- 
tee work, as well as supervising MFA thesis productions. 
Review begins March 15 & continues until all positions are 
filled. • Production Faculty: Significant professional exp 
required in one or more areas: cinematography, directing, 
editing, production management, producing & screenwriting. 
Teach entry-level production classes; knowledge of filmmak- 
ing digital appls a plus; M.F.A. preferred. • Cinema Studies/ 
Production Faculty: Teach undergraduate classes in Film/ 
Video History & Aesthetics & supervise multi-section cours- 
es. Teaching & production exp in one or more areas: audio, 
cinematography, directing, editing, production management, 
producing, or screenwriting is required. M.F.A. or Ph.D. pre- 
ferred. • Computer Animation: Experienced teacher w/ M.F.A. 
or M.A. degree in Art/Design &/or professional w/ at least 4 




SON VIDA PICTURES 

Online/Offline Editing 

New York City 

(212) 889-1775 



Judge us 
By The 




"We: Kee 




Smithsonian Institution 

Tifie film collection from the gieat cultural 
institution's Office of lelecommunications. 



KHJJAM 

Trie world's premier collection of early motion 
pictures, silent features, and shorts: 1896-1940. 




Hearst historical 

'np nl thp nrpmipr nktnrirni rnllprtir 



One of the premier historical collections 
dating back to the turn of the century. 



Andrew Conti 
tel: (212) 653-1558 
fax: (21 2) 799-9258 



HOT 



COOL, OT7TS 

email: clips@filmclip.com 



WPIXTV11 

footage from Ws best news station. From I948 to the present. 
[ lackie 0, Yankees, Studio 54 & morel 



Rick DeCroix 
tel: (212) 799-1978 
fax:(212) 712-9297 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST CONTEMPORARY & ARCHIVAL STOCK FOOTAGE LIBRARY 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 55 



CLASSIFIED S 



Need legal representation? 

Call Ken Feldman or Abe Michael Shainberg at the 
Feldman Law Firm for 

INDEPENDENT FILM PACKAGING TO FINANCIERS AND DISTRIBUTORS 

AGREEMENTS .CONTRACT REVIEW, LITIGATION , COLLECTION, OR DEFENSE IF SUED. 

"3? Free Consultation © Fair Rates "» 



FELDMAN LAW FIRM , 12 East 41 s1 Street, #1302, 212-532-8585, fax: 212-532-8598 
www. feldman-law.com or e-mail us at abems@concentric.net 



Context Studios 

Film & Video Services 



LOW COST 




film-to-video 

transfer 

• double system 

• time coded transfers 

precise drop frame sync for computer editing 
and original picture matchback 

• mag track recording 

PLUS: 

• non-linear editing 

• 1 6 track digital recording studio 

• film and video screening 

• theater with lights, sound system, multiple 
camera video recording and live switching 

• 10,000 Sf Of Space for rehearsal, 
shooting & set construction 



Context StUdiOS • 28 Avenue A 
NY, NY 10009* (212)505-2702 



Creative editorial 
services for film 
and television. 

A seasoned and capable editor 
with documentary and feature 
credits, as well as national 
• TV commercials and award- 
winning corporate video. 
• 

MEDIA 100 EDIT SUITE... 

'ledia 100XR (300kB, 

..eal-Time transitions). 
54GB storage, BetaSR SHVS, 
DAT, CD, Scanner, After Effects, 
Photoshop, Illustrator... 



John Slater 



(800) 807-4142 

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS WELCOME 



yrs exp. on SGI workstations, Softimage & Alias software. 
Strong record of professional accomplishment as an inde- 
pendent &/or fraditional animator preferred. Ability to teach 
traditional animation courses &/or computer animation his- 
tory a plus. Program emphasis on story & content rather than 
technology, as students prepare for employment. Duties incl. 
curriculum refinement & budget preparation.* Cinemato- 
graphy: Teach cinematography classes, including camera 
operation, image design & composition, lighting for motion 
picture & video, photochemistry, laboratory processing & 
densitometry. Significant professional exp as D.P & be willing 
to expand into areas, incl. digital appls. M.F.A. preferred; 
teaching exp highly desirable. • Columbia College Chicago is 
a diverse, open admissions, urban institution of 8,600 
undergraduate & graduate students emphasizing arts & com- 
munications in a liberal education setting. We offer a com- 
petitive salary & excellent benefits pkg. Minority & women 
especially encouraged to apply. Film/Video Search (Specify 
Position), Columbia College Chicago, 600 S. Michigan Ave., 
Chicago, IL 60605, eoe m/f/d/v 

FRESH AIR FUND seeks photography teacher to lead studio 
& documentary classes during 9 wk. summer residential 
camp in Fishkill, NY for NYC teens. Prior teaching exp. req'd. 
Resume to Miriam Seidenfeld, 1040 6th Ave., 3rd fl„ NYC 
10018; (800) 367-0003. eoe. 



long & short form nonlinear editing affordable 

rates for 
online/offline, motion graphics, film independents! 



INDIE PROJECTS: Innovative film/video co. seeks entrepre- 
neurs in arts, all areas: equip, operators, directors, crews, 
editors, etc. Visit www.scnproductions.com/eia.htm to view 
projects. Compensation is end determinative. 

WELL-ESTABLISHED freelance camera group in NYC seeking 
professional shooters as well as soundmen w/ Betacam 
video experience to work w/ our wide array of news & news 
magazine clients. If qualified, contact COA immediately at 
(212)505-1911. 

Preproduction • Development 

BUDGETS/INVESTOR PACKAGE Experienced Line Producer 
will prepare script breakdowns. Shooting schedules & 
detailed budgets. Movie Magic equipped. Low budget indie 
rates, negotiable. Mark (212) 340-1243. 

SCREENPLAYS, SHORTS SOUGHT by producer & director 
for production in '99. Under 30 min. only. Magic Child 
Productions, 10 Park Ave., Ste. #18B, NY NY 10016. 
Include SASE for return. 

SU-CITY PICTURES: The Screenplay Doctor, The Movie 
Mechanic: We provide screenplay/treatment/synopsis/ 
films-in-progress insight/analysis. Studio credentials 
include: Miramax & Warner Bros. Competitive rates. 
Brochure: (212) 219-9224; www.su-city-pictures.com 



P0STPR0DUCTI0N 



65 st. marks place, suite 16, nyc 10003 David Chmura, editor 



TN^i^,, -^ FILM & VIDEO 
JJGuOLLJL 212-228-1914 



16MM & 35MM OPTICAL SOUNDTRACKS: If you want "High 
Quality" optical sound for your film, you need a "High 
Quality" optical sound negative. Mike Holloway, Optical 
Sound Chicago, Inc., 676 N. LaSalle St., #404, Chicago, IL 
60610; (312) 943-1771, or eves: (847) 541-8488. 

16MM CUTTING ROOMS: 8-plate & 6-plate fully equipped 



56 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



I 



THE ASSOCIATI 

VIDEO AN 



N OF INDEPENDENT 
i FILMMAKERS 



About AIVF and FIVF 

The Association of Independent 
Video and Filmmakers (AIVF) is a 
national membership organization of 
over 5,000 diverse, committed, 
opinionated and fiercely independent 
video and filmmakers. ATVF is 
affiliated with the Foundation for 
Independent Video and Film (FIVF), 
an educational 501(c)(3) nonprofit 
dedicated to the development and 
increased public appreciation of 
independent film and video. 

To succeed as an independent today, 
you need a wealth of resources, strong 
connections, and the best information 
available. Whether through the pages 
of our magazine, The Independent Film 
& Video Monthly, or through the 
organization raising its collective 
voice to advocate for important 
issues, ATVF preserves your 
independence while letting you know 
you're not alone. 

Here's what AIVF 
membership offers: 

thelndependent 

"We Love This Magazine!!" 
-UTNE Reader- 
Membership provides you with a 
year's subscription to The Independent 
Thought-provoking features, news, 
and regular columns on business, 
technical and legal matters. Plus 
festival listings, distributor profiles, 
funder profiles, funding deadlines, 



exhibition venues, and announcements 
of member activities and new 
programs and services. Special issues 
highlight regional activity and focus 
on subjects including experimental 
media, new technologies, and media 
education. 

INSURANCE 

Members are eligible to purchase 
discounted personal and production 
insurance plans through ATVF 
suppliers. Health insurance options 
are available, as well as E&O and 
production plans tailored to the 
needs of low-budget mediamakers. 

TRADE DISCOUNTS 

Businesses across the country offer 
AIVF members discounts on equipment 
and auto rentals, film processing 
transfers, editing and other production 
necessities. Plus long-distance and 
overnight courier services are 
available at special rates for AIVF 
members from national companies. 
Members also receive discounts on 
hotels and car rentals. 

WORKSHOPS, PANELS, 
AND SEMINARS 

Special events covering the whole 
spectrum of current issues and 
concerns affecting the field ranging 
from business and aesthetic to 
technical and political topics. 

INFORMATION 

Stay connected through www.aivf.org. 
Members are entitled to exclusive 
on-line services such as searchable 



databases and web-specific content 
published by The Independent We 
also distribute informational resources 
on financing funding distribution, 
and production; members receive 
discounts on selected titles. With 
over 600 volumes, our office library 
houses information on everything 
from distributors to sample contracts 
to budgets. 

COMMUNITY 

Monthly member get-togethers 
called AIVF Salons occur in cities 
across the country. These member- 
run, member organized salons 
provide a unique opportunity for 
members and non-members alike to 
network exhibit, and advocate for 
independent media in their local 
area. To find the salon nearest you 
check the back pages of The 
Independent the AIVF website, or 
call the office for the one nearest 
you. If you can't find one in your 
area then start one! 

CONFERENCE ROOM 

Members have access to our low- 
cost facility to hold meetings, 
auditions, or small private video 
presentations of work for friends, 
distributors, funders, and producers. 

ADVOCACY 

AIVF continues its efforts to advocate 
for the field holding forums around 
the country and publishing articles 
to keep independent mediamakers 
abreast of the latest issues 
concerning our community. 



MEMBERSHIP CATEGORIES 

INDIVIDUAL/STUDENT MEMBERSHIP 

Includes: one year's subscription to The Independent • access to group insurance plans and discounts • 
on-line or over-the-phone information services • discounted admission to seminars and events • book 
discounts • advocacy action alerts • eligibility to vote and run for board of directors • members' 
only web services. 

SUPPORTING MEMBERSHIP 

All of the above benefits extended to two members of the same household except for the year's 
subscription to The Independent, which is shared by both 

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION/BUSINESS fr INDUSTRY MEMBERSHIP 
All the above benefits (except access to insurance plans) with 3 one-year subscriptions to The 
Independent • representative may vote and run for board of directors • special mention in 
The Independent 



UBRARYAJNIVERSnY SUBSCRIPTION 

Year's subscription to The Independent for multiple readers 



JOIN AIW TODAY! 



□ $100/1 yr. 

□ $150/1 yr. 



MEMBERSHIP RATES 

Student □ $35/1 yr. 

(enclose copy of current student ID) 

Individual □ $55/1 yr. 

Supporting □ $9S/1 yr. 

Non-profit Organization 

Business 8r Industry 

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION 

□ $75 domestic □ $90 foreign 

Name 

Organization __ 

Address 

City 



□ $60/2 yrs. 

□ $100/2 yrs. 

□ $150/2 yrs. 



State 



ZIP 



Weekday teL 
Email 



Country 
fax 



MAHJN6 RATES 

Magazines are mailed second-class in the US 

□ Canada - add $1S 

□ Mexico - add $20 

□ All other countries - add $45 

□ First-class U.S. mailing - add $30 






Your additional contribution will help support programs of 
the Foundation for Independent Video and Film, a public, 
educational non-profit tax exempt under section S01(cX3). 



X 






Membership cost 

Mailing costs (if applicable) 

Additional tax-deductible contribution to FIVF* 

(please make separate check payable to FIVF) 

Total amount enclosed (check or money order) 

Or please bill my Q Visa D Mastercard 

Acct# 

Exp. date: / / 

Signature 



Mail to AIVF, 304 Hudson St, 6th Floor, NY, NY 10013; or charge by phone (212) £07-1400 x236, 
by fax (212) 463-SS19, or via our website www.aivf.org 



IsTm 



rooms, sound-transfer facilities, 24-hr access. Downtown, near 
all subways & Canal St. Reasonable rates. (212) 925-1500. 

16MM SOUND MIX only $100/hr. Interlocked 16mm picture 
& tracks mixed to 16 or 35mm fullcoat. 16mm/35mm post 
services: picture & sound editorial, ADR, interlock screening, 
16mm mag xfers (.06/ft), 16mm edgecoding (.015/ft). Call 
TOM (201) 807-0155. 

AVID 8000: Why rent an Avid Media Composer 400 when you 
can get an 8000 for less 7 Avid Media Composer 8000; real- 
time fx; 4 channel pro-tools; 24 hr access. Seriously unbeat- 
able prices!! (212) 375-0785; (718) 638-0028. 

AVID 8000 & 1000 SUITES: Pleasant, friendly, comfortable 
Upper West Side location. On-line & off-line, AVR 77; reason- 
able & affordable rates. Tech support provided. (212) 595- 
5002; (718) 885-0955. 

AVID EDITOR: A dozen feature credits. New Media Composer 
w/ AVR 77 & offline resolutions. Beta SR DAT, Extra hard dri- 
ves. Pro-tools sound. Editing-mixing. Fast & easy to get along 
with. Will work on your Avid or mine. Drina (212) 561-0829 

BRODSKY & TREADWAY Film-to-tape masters. Reversal only. 
Regular 8mm, Super 8, or archival 16mm to 1" or Betacam 
SP We love early B&W & Kodachrome. Scene-by-scene only. 
Correct frame rates. For appt. call (978) 948-7985. 

EDITOR WITH EQUIPMENT: Accomplished visual story-teller 
w/ feature & broadcast credits; recent doc featured at 
Sundance '99. Use your equipment or my well-equipped stu- 
dio. Commercial & corporate credits incL major agencies 
(Young & Rubicam, Seiden Group) & accounts (Johnson & 
Johnson, Weight Watchers, Arm & Hammer, USA Today, BMW, 
Goldman Sachs). Media 100XR (300KB), 54GB storage, After 
Effects, Beta, Scanner, DAT, PhotoShop, Illustrator. John 
Slater: (800) 807-4142; www.johnslater.com 

FOR RENT: OFF-LINE AVID in a spacious air-conditioned 
suite, located at 180 Varick. Avid 1000; AVR 3-77; 69 GB 
storage; Beta deck; Media Composer 6.5.3.; Power Mac 
9600. Available now. Call Moxie Films, Inc. (212) 620-7727 

MEDIA 100 for rent in Boston: Excellent rates! Top of the line 
XR system with 300 KB resolution; 32 gigs hard drive space; 
Beta SP deck; Private office with 24 hour access and beau- 
tiful garden. Call Liz Canner (617) 266-2418. 

MEDIA 100 EDITING Broadcast quality, newest software. 
Huge storage & RAM. Betacam, 3/4", all DV formats, S-VHS, 
Hi-8 . . . Great location, friendly environment & low rates, 
tech support, talented editors & fx artists available. (212) 
431-9299. 

MEDIA 100 PCI, broadcast quality, real time suite: Beta-SR 
Hi8, 3/4", VHS. AfterEffects, Elastic Reality, PhotoShop, 
Illustrator, Hi Res Scanner. Short- & long-term TV or feature 
projects in comfortable Tribeca setting. (212) 941-7720. 

OUTPOST Digital Productions: 3 rooms, all MedialOO V-4.5 
broadcast quality. Beta, DV, Hi8, VHS; AfterEffects, Deck 2. 
Lots of drive space; great editors or self-operate. Low rates, 
free coffee. (718) 599-2385. Williamsburg; outpost 
video.com 

THE MEDIA LOFT, "High-end look at low-end prices!" VHS & 
3/4 suites, Hi-8 video, Super-8 film, audio & photo services. 
Call Bill Creston: (212) 924-4893. 



www.16x9dtv.com 



ShOOt for the Future 

I 6 '.9 DTV is our business 

RGni3l digital cameras / lights / sound 

ECl it on-line / off-line non-linear 

Ur & OTGW 35 features / documentaries ... 
16:9 Broadcast Camera 
w/DP, Lights, Sound w^ doing greal in 4 3 , or 20 years. 

we're now delving Into nDTV 

Produce for the Next Millennium 

Discount, Benefits & Co-prod. Opportunities for our h8-VtSK)N members Call for details 212 334 4778 




THE SCHOOL of FILMMAKING 

• Professional conservatory program 

to • Complete production and post-production 
facilities in the all-new Studio Village 

1 Award-winning professional faculty 




North Carolina. 



School of the Arts 

Interviews are scheduled on campus. For more information, write: Admissions, 

North Carolina School of the Arts, 1533 S. Main St., Winston-Salem, NC 27127-2188, 

or telephone (336) 770-3291, or visit us online: www.ncarts.edu 

An equal opportunity institution of the University of North Carolina. 




April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 57 



by Michelle Coe 

Most events listed take place at the AIVF Office: 
304 Hudson St. (between Spring &. Vandam) 6th 
fl., in New York City. Subways: 1, 9 (Houston St.); 
C, E (Spring St.); A (Canal St.) We encourage 
people to RSVP for events (larger events require 
50% deposit to save seats) as well as check in tor 
updates and potential time changes. Please visit 
our website: www.aivf.org or our Event Hotline: 
(212) 807-1400 ext. 301 for the latest info. 

April Events 

AIVF PROUDLY CO-SPONSORS 

THE FIFTH NIGHT SCREENPLAY READING 
AND SHORT FILM SERIES 
When: Every Tuesday 

Doors at 7:30, short film screening starts at 8 
Where: Nuyorican Poets Cafe, 236 East 3rd St., NY 
G«t: AH tickets $8. 

To make reservations/hear more details: Contact Fifth 
Night (212) 529-9329. 

The Fitch Night Screenplay Reading and Short 
Film Series has presented over 1 50 readings, with 
nearly 30 scripts curretnly in production or 
already produced. This acclaimed weekly program 
presents narrative, feature 'length readings that 
can push a script to the next level. Past screen- 
plays have included Kicked in the Head, Trees 
Lounge, and Sudden Manhattan, read by such 
actors as Stanley Tucci, Janeane Garofalo, and 
Frances McDormand. Screenings of short films 



precede all readings. The Fifth Night provides an 
inspiring environment for screenwriters, produc- 
ers, actors, agents, and financiers to network and 
create community. 

AIVF ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING 
When: Thursday, April 9, 6:30-10 p.m. 
Mingling starts at 6:30; 
Meeting comes to order at 7 
Where: Manhattan Neighborhood Network 
537 W. 59th St (& 10th Ave.), NYC 
Cost: Free to all and open to the general public 
To register /hear more details: (212) 807-1400 x. 301. 
RSVP required. 

Join fellow AIVF members, the AIVF Board, and 
staff and learn more about our plans tor the 
upcoming year. Enhancing the evening will be a 
special surprise guest and screening! Details will 
appear on our website and on our Events Hotline. 

meet & greet: 
Eureka Pictures, Inc. 

When: Thursday, April 15, 6:30-8:30 p.m. 

Where: AIVF office 

Cost: Free to members; $10/general public 

T> register/hear more details: (212) 807-1400 x. 301. 

RSVP required. 

Eureka Pictures, Inc. is a New York-based produc- 
tion company committed to producing low-budget 
independent features with unique perspectives, 
focusing on emerging directorial talent. Eureka's 
feature productions include The Myth of 
Fingerprints, Breathing Room, and Alexandre 



2fc_ 


2fc a 


1 


READ ME A 


m _jh < Sb 


S£Y ^^cfl 




STORY: 


*» • f 


ML M 


% 


Fifth Nighters 
[l-r] Phyllis 
Somerville 


f * 1 J 


1MW 




(actress), Dana 
Hensley (cast- 


v A 


' # ^ /■ 




ing), Alexandra 
Berger (project 


1 


fc T x»«fT i 


^^H 


director), 


* 


* M* 'J 


W 


Jennifer Low 
Sauer (casting 
director), and 


^^^^ ^ 


: B 


lfc 


Jodi Collins 


^k W* 41 


24 m 


P* 


(casting direc- 


PQ 9T & 


m^^ 


tor). 




4B§ i __ Jl 


!■ 




r M 


wimd 


1 





Rockwell's Louis and Frank. Currently in post is 
The Opportunists, starring Christopher Walken. 
Eureka is also in its fourth season of Split Screen, a 
half-hour magazine-style series seen on Bravo &. 
the Independent Film Channel hosted by indie 
maverick John Pierson. 

PANEL DISCUSSION: 
FILMMAKING TECHNOLOGY— PAST AND PRESENT 
(WITH A SPECIAL DEMONSTRATION OF EDITDV) 

Steve Ascher discusses his revised version of The 
Filmmaker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide For 
the Digital Age 

When: Monday, April 19, 7-9 p.m. 

Where: AIVF office 

Cost: $5 AIVF mem- 

bers/$ 1 general 

public 

To register/hear more 

details: (212) 807- 

1400 x. 301. RSVP 

required. 

The Filmmaker's 
Handbook has been 
a staple of produc- 
tion know-how 
since its publication 
in 1984- Ascher, whose acclaimed documentary 
Troublesome Creek: A Midwestern, won the 
Audience Award and the Special Jury Prize at the 
1996 Sundance Film Festival, has revised this 
essential reference book to incorporate digital 
technology. Join AIVF as Ascher leads a discus- 
sion with David Leitner on new and old meth- 
ods — traditional and computer-based editing sys- 
tems, film-to-tape transfers and vice versa, shoot- 
ing with film and video cameras, and analog and 
digital recording. The discussion will be 
enhanced by a demo of editDV, courtesy Smart 
Machines. 

Signed copies of The Filmmaker's Handbook: A 
Comprehensive Guide for the Digital Age ($18.95) 
will be available for purchase. 



AIVF CO-SPONSORS NEW FILMMAKERS 

Co-Sponsored by Angelika Entertainment Corp. 
6k the New York Underground Film Festival 
When: Every Wednesday; shorts at 7 p.m.; 




58 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



features at 8 

Where: Anthology Film Archives (32 2nd Ave) 
Cost: $5 for both shows. Tkts avail, at box office. 
For a complete schedule: Visit the AIVF Resource 
Library to pick up an Anthology monthly schedule, or 
call Anthology at (212) 505-5110. 

New Filmmakers gives independent film- and 
videomakers the chance to exhibit their work to 
the public and New York audiences the opportu- 
nity to see outstanding new films. A year-round 
festival, the program is administered by filmmak- 
ers for filmmakers. 

IVIsy Preview 

FIFTH NIGHT READING SERIES AND AIVF PRESENT: 
THE ART OF THE SHORT FILM 

When: Saturday, May 15, all day. (Launched with 
The Fifth Night 2nd Bi-Annual Spring Party on 
Friday, May 14. Details: (212) 529-9329.) 

This comprehensive workshop will combine 
screenplay readings, film screenings, and discus- 
sion. Scripts of one narrative and one documen- 
tary will be examined, followed by screenings of 
the completed films and filmmaker Q&A. The 
day will wrap up with a panel of festival program- 
mers, curators, and filmmakers on the marketabil- 
ity and lifespan of the short. Details to be 
announced on the AIVF Events Line and on our 
website. 

LET AIVF DO THE NETWORKING FOR YOU 

We get an average of 35 walk-ins per week of film- 
makers looking to crew up or get involved in pro- 
jects. Our resume bank and bulletin boards are 
filled with listings of talented cast and crew look- 
ing for projects and collaborators. We are currently 
updating our resources, so send us your resumes or 
business cards! 

Likewise, if you are looking to crew up your 
project, mail or fax us your posting. (Please 
include a deadline or announcement date on the 
flyer to help keep our boards current.) Send infor- 
mation to the attention of Michelle Coe, program 
and information services director, Resume Bank 
c/o AIVF, 304 Hudson St., 6th fL, NY, NY 10013. 

FILM BYTES 

Every Monday at 8 p.m. ET at www.pseudo.com, 
AIVF co-hosts FILM BYTES, a webcast series 
about independent media production. Produced 
by Kinotek 6k Pseudo Network. 

NOT RECEIVING YOUR INDEPENDENT! 

If you have any problems receiving The 
Independent or questions regarding your AIVF 
membership, please call LaTrice Dixon or Marya 
Wethers x. 236. 



Dear AIVF, FAF, and IDA Members: 

The National Coalition of Independent Public Broadcasting Producers 
seeks your feedback! 

In 1988 Congress established the Independent Television Service 
(ITVS) to bring independently produced programs to public televi- 
sion. This action, in response to wide-spread grassroots pressure 
from public television audiences, promised to foster programs that 
involve creative risk and to address the needs of unserved and 
underserved audiences, particularly children and minorities. In the 
past decade, ITVS has funded 171 single programs, 19 limited series, 
and 55 kids spots totaling 260 hours of programming. 

The National Coalition of Independent Public Broadcasting 
Producers, a dedicated group of media representatives from across 
the country, was created by the same enabling legislation which cre- 
ated ITVS. The Coalition serves two important functions: 1) to 
appoint members to the ITVS board of directors; and 2) to serve as 
a "watchdog" through political challenges, controversies, and 
changes in the independent media landscape. The Coalition works to 
assure that ITVS fulfills its hard-won place in support of makers 
and audience alike. 

In 199 8 our three membership organizations became permanent 
designees on the Coalition. Joining AIVF, IDA, and FAF representa- 
tives will be two independent representatives from the field. During 
the transition in fall of 1998, Louis Massiah (of Scribe Video 
Center), Lillian Jimenez (representing the previous Coalition), and 
Dee Davis (as a departing ITVS board member) served on the 
Coalition. 

The first and very important task this newly-configured group 
undertook was to nominate to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting 
five ITVS board members to serve alongside those board members whose 
terms expire in 1999 and 2000. The newly appointed board members 
are Juanita Anderson (independent producer, Boston), Cynthia A. 
Gehrig (Jerome Foundation, St. Paul), Kevin Martin (KERA, Dallas), 
Cara Mertes (independent producer, New York), and David Rosen (media 
consultant, San Francisco). 

Appointing ITVS board members and watchdogging ITVS' activities 
are ongoing responsibilities. In this spirit we ask you, our mem- 
bers, to make the success of the Coalition— and the future of ITVS— a 
high priority. 

We commit our best efforts to represent the interests of inde- 
pendent producers in this newly restructured Coalition. We welcome 
your comments, questions, and ideas as we join together to maximize 
the future potential of the Independent Television Service. 

Very sincerely, 

Diane Markrow, Association of Independent Video and Filmmakers 

Gail Silva, Film Arts Foundation 

David Haugland, International Documentary Association 

NOTE: Correspondence to the Coalition may be sent via email to 
"itvscoalition@hotmail.com" or snail mail to Coalition, c/o Film Arts 
Foundation, 346 Ninth Street, San Francisco, CA 94103. 



ALL-NEW RESOURCES! 

PRINTED TO ORDER'CONTINUALLY UPDATED frnm A|VF/FIVF 



i must 



THE AIVF FILM AND VIDEO SELF-DISTRIBUTION TOOLKIT 

edited by loannis Mookas $25/20 members plus shipping and handling 

A comprehensive collection of articles and interviews with filmmakers and industry professionals on how to make 
a go on your own and come out ahead. The Toolkit includes case studies of successful self-distribution models 
with emphasis on theatrical and educational distribution for features, documentaries, and experimental projects. 

THE AIVF FILM AND VIDEO EXHIBITORS GUIDE 

edited by Kathryn Bowser $30/25 members plus shipping and handling 

have for film and videomakers searching for exhibition outlets. The Exhibitors Guide presents handy pro- 
files of over 900 screening sites, from commercial arthouses to colleges and universities to artists' spaces. 



CALL NOW (212) 807-1400 x.303, or visit www.aivf.org 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 59 



TRADE DISCOUNTS 



School 



Learn How 

Independent Filmmaking 

Really Works 

THE ART OF THE PITCH 

The Shooting GalleryS Jim Powers 

coaches you on pitching 

your project to the industry. 

CINEMATOGRAPHY 
FOR THE DIGITAL AGE 

A breakdown of digital video 

from shooting through post, 

with screenings on video and 

35mm. 

Spring Session Begins In March 

Call for complete class listing. 

212-965-9444 x240 

reelschool@filmmakers.org 

http://www.filmmakers.org/school.htm 



m5^0 




Digital Media Arts Center 

audio & video 
post-production 

protools 4 / media 100 /after effects 

1 6 - track lock to betacam sp & 3/4 

voice over & adr/sound effects 

video capture & compression 

original music/sound design 

special rates for independents 

Harvestworks Digital Media Arts Center 

2 12.431.1130 x I 

596 Broadway, Suite 602, NYC 10012 

http://www.li arvestworks.org 



Discounts are available to current AIVF members 
with card. NY discounts listed in the Jan/Feb issue. 

ARIZONA 

FX Factory 

(520) 623-3175; FXFactory@aol.com 
Special effects production studio specializing in film effects, 
prosthetics, and makeup effects for film, TV, and theater. AIVF 
members receive 15% to 30% discount on labor. 

CALIFORNIA 

Aries Post 

1680 Vine Street, Ste. 216, Hollywood, CA 90028 
Contact: Kevin Glover (213) 463-6296; ariespost@aol.com 
10% discount off rate card for all video post-production ser- 
vices including: Beta SR Hi8, 3/4", S-VHS & DVC to Beta SP 
analog A/B editing & AVID nonlinear suite. 

Mill Valley Film Group 

104 Eucalyptus Knoll, Mill Valley, CA 94941 
Contact: Will Pamnello (415) 381-9309; fax: 389-9110; 
MVFG@aol.com 

Independent documentary producers, established & award- 
winning provide free consultation when you rent from us with 
35% discounts on Media 100SX, Media lOONubus, Avid 400s, 
VHS cuts only system & Beta SP production package. 

Studio Film and Tape 

215 N Highland Ave., Hollywood, CA 90038 

Contact: Richard Kaufman (800) 824-3130; 

fax: (213) 463-2121; SFTSERVICE@SPTWEB.COM 

10% discount on new Fuji 16mm film, llford 16mm b/w film, 

Maxell videotape (all formats), all editorial supplies mcl. leader. 

mag stock, splicing tape & computer data storage media. 

Virgin Moon Post 

56 E. Main St., Ste. 207, Ventura, CA 93001 

Contact: Ken Finning (805) 652-6890; fax: (805) 652-6899 

10% discount on all post-production services-. Media 100XS, 

Betacam SP. Adobe After Effects, Adobe Photoshop, Boris 

Effects, online/offline, Fresh Music Library, DLT Back-up, Quick 

Time. 

COLORADO 

MovieMaker 

4730 Table Mesa Dr, Ste. B-100, Boulder, CO 80303 
Contact: Susan L. Kinney (303) 449-6300; fax: (303) 499-7245 
15% discount on video production services including shooting, 
editing script consultation. 

FLORIDA 

Film Friends 

729 NE 71st St., Miami, FL 33138 
Contact Mik Cribben (305) 757-9038; fax: (305) 757-9795; 
mikcamera@earthlmk.net 

20% discount on extensive range of equipment rentals-, cam- 
era, video, lighting sound, grip & Steadicam. 

ILLINOIS 

Cybertech Media 

26 W. 482 Blair, Winfield. IL 60190 

Contact: Larry Spiegel (630) 690-7611; fax: 690-2143; 

MEDIA@CYBERTECHMEDIA.COM 

10% discount on all videotape conversions to streaming video 



formats such as Real Video, NetShow, or Vivo for use on the 
Internet, or Quicklime and AVI formats for use on CD-ROM. 

Studio Film and Tape 

110 WKinzie St.. Chicago, IL 60610 

Contact: Max Good (800) 467-0070; fax: (312) 467-0074; 

SFTchi@Ameritech.net 

10% discount on new Fuji film & llford B/W film. 

MARYLAND 

East Light Productions 

413 S.Ann St., Baltimore, MD 21214 
Contact: John Kavanaugh at (410) 276-4696 or Jaime Roberts at 
(410) 583-2583; fax: (410) 342-1368; LCPJK@ER0LS.COM or 
LAMIER@H0ME.COM 

30% discount on Avid editing or negotiate for projects. 10% 
discount on Beta SP shoots, Sony 600 (switchable 16x9 for- 
mat), or Sony 70IS camera package. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Northeast Negative Matchers, Inc. 

25 Riverview Terrace, Springfield, MA 01108-1603 

Contact Ins Girard (413) 736-2177; fax: 734-1211 

nenm@nenm.com 

10% minimum discount on negative cutting services on any 

format. FREE use of 16mm or 35mm 8-plate Steenbeck editing 

suites. Call for details. 

NEW JERSEY 

Ren Media 

2011 St. George Ave., Rahway, NJ 07065 

Contact: Ruth Kennedy (732) 382-6815; fax: 382-5329 

Discounts on music scoring for film/video. 

TEXAS 

R.W. Productions 

Contact Ken Herbert (713) 522-4701; fax: 522-0426 
10-25% discounts off the standard price of D-Vision (offline), 
Media-100 (online), Beta SP camera package, 16mm Arn-BLs. 

Texcam 

3263 Brenard Ave., Houston, TX 77098 

(713) 524-2774; fax: 524-2779; texcam@iapc.net 

Up to 15% discount on film camera packages (16mm and 

35mm). 

VERMONT 

Edgewood Motion Picture and Video 

162 N. Main St., Rutland, VT 05701 

Contact: David Giancola (802) 773-0510; pbeckwl968@ 

aol.com 

25% off production (Betacam SP, 3/4", ARRI 16mm and 

35mm), editing (AVID Media Composer 1000, Betacam SP/ 

3/4" on-line) and audio mix (digital audio facilities). 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Yellow Cat Productions 

505 11th St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 

Contact: Mary Flannery (202) 543-2221; fax: 543-2287; 

yellowcat@yellowcat.com 

15% off of a full day video shoot with a 2 person crew, 15% off 

any Avid editing in charming townhouse on Capitol Hill. 

* See www.aivf.org for our comprehensive listing. 



60 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 



@SEsa 



AIVF Salons provide an opportunity for members to 
discuss work, meet other independents, share war 
stories, and connect with the AIVF community 
across the country. Note: Since our copy deadline is 
two months before the meetings listed below, be sure 
to call the local organizers to confirm that there have 
been no last-minute changes. 

Albany, NY: 

When: 1st Wednesday of each month, 6:30 p.m. 

Where: Borders Books & Music, Wolf Rd. 

Contact: Mike Camoin (518) 489-2083; videos4c@ 

cris.com 

Atlanta, GA: 

When: Second Tuesday of the month, 6:30 p.m. 
Where: Redlight Cafe, Amsterdam Outlets off of 
Monroe Dr. 
Contact: Mark Wynns, IMAGE (404) 352-4225 xl2 

Austin, TX: 

When: Last Monday of the month, 8 p.m. 
Where: Electric Lounge, 302 Bowie Street 
Contact: Ben Davis, (512) 708-1962 

Birmingham, AL: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: Michele Foreman, (205) 298-0685 

Boston, MA: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: Susan Walsh, (508) 528-7279 

Brooklyn, NY: 

When: 4th Tuesday of each month; call for time. 
Where: Ozzie's Coffeehouse, 7th Ave. & Lincoln PI. 
Contact: Glenn Francis Frontera, (718) 
646-7533 




Charleston, SC: 

When/Where: Last Thursday of 

each month from 6:30-8:45 p.m. at Charleston 

County Library Auditorium, 68 Calhoun St. 

Contact: Peter Paolim, (843) 805-6841; filmsalon@ 

aol.com 

Cleveland, OH: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: Annetta Marion, (216) 781-1755 

Dallas, TX: 

When: 3rd Wednesday of each month, 7 p.m. 

Where: Call for locations. 

Contact: Bart Weiss, (214) 999-8999 

Denver/Boulder, CO: 

Monthly activist screenings: 

When: Second Thursday of the month, 7p.m. 

Where: Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center, 

1520 Euclid Ave. 

Other events: Call for date and location 

Contact: Diane Markrow, (303) 449-7125 or 

Jon Stout (303) 442-8445 

Palm Beach, FL: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: Dominic Giannetti, (561) 326-2668 

Houston, TX: 

When: Last Tuesday of each month, 7 p.m. 



Where: Call for locations. 

Contact: Houston Film Commission Hotline, (713) 

227-1407 

Lincoln, NE: 

When: Second Wednesday of each month, 5:30 p.m. 

Where: Call for location 

Contact: Lori Vidlak, (402) 476-5422 or dot(a inet- 

nebr.com 

Kansas City, MO: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: John Sjlobom (816) 333-7574 

New Brunswick, NJ: 

When: Last Wednesday of each month, call tor time. 

Where: Cappiccino's Gourmet Cafe, Colonial Village 

Rte. 27 & Parsonage Rd., Edison, NJ. 

Contact: Allen Chou (908) 756-9845 or www.pas- 

sionriver.com 

New Haven, CT: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 

Contact: Jim Gherer, ACES Media Arts Center, 

(203) 782-3675 

Portland, OR: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: Beth Harrington, (360) 256-6254 

San Diego, CA: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 

Contact: Paul Espinosa, espinosa(5 ! electriciti.com 

(619) 284-9811 

Seattle, WA: 

When/Where: Call for dates and locations. 
Contact: Joel Bachar, (206) 282-3592 

Tucson, AZ: 

When/Where: First Monday of each month from 6-8 
p.m. at Club Congress, 311 E. Congress, in down- 
town Tucson. 

Contact: Beverly Seckinger, (520) 621-1239, Robert 
Ashle at robert@access.tucson.org or visit http:// 
access.tucson.org/aivf/ 

Washington, DC: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 
Contact: DC Salon hotline (202) 554-3263 x. 4 

Westchester, NY: 

When/Where: Call for date and location. 

Contact: Bob Curtis, (914) 741-2538; reel 11(5 

aol.com or Jonathan Kaplan (914) 948-3447; jkap3(a 

juno.com 

Youngstown, OH: 

When/Where: Call for dates and times. 

Contact: Art Byrd, The Flick Clique, www.cboss. 

com/flickclique 

For updates or changes to this listing contact LaTrice 

Dixon x. 236 or members@aivf.org 



NO SALON IN YOUR AREA? 

We have a new resource kit for folks wanting 

to start an AIVF salon in their community. 

If you are interested, call Latrice Dixon at 

(212) 807-1400 x.236, or visit the salon 

section at www.aivf.org 



J / n e/ & & 




Create 




non-linear video editing 



in the comfort 



of a private edit suite 



component interformat studio: 

betacam-sp,3/4",hi-8,s-vhs 

3d animation/graphics/cg 



Video for Art's Sake 

Independent Post Production 
in the East Village 




Meg Hanley, Editor 

212.254.1106 



AVID 



New MC 7.1 PCI 

FEATURES 

SHORTS 

DOCUMENTARIES 

BROADCAST COMMERCIALS 

DEMO REELS 

MUSIC VIDEOS 

CORPORATE VIDEOS 



Editorial Services with 
experienced cutting-edge editors 



OFFLINE/ONLINE 

AVR up to 77 

Beta SP/VHS/TC DAT 

After Effects & 3D Effects 



HOURLY/DAILY/WEEKLY RATES 



MERCI MEDIA, INC. 

143 WEST 29TH STREET, 

SUITE 902 

NEW YORK, NY 10001 

VOICE: 212/563 0210 

FAX: 212/563 0221 

mercient@mercient.com 

www.mercient.com 



AA 




l/\ 



April 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 61 



NON LINEAR 
EDITING 




V 



D 



O 



REAL TIME TRANSITIONS 



BROADCAST ONLINE 
3:1 TO 200:1 OFFLINE 



MULTI-LAYERING 



BETACAM SP EDITING 
HI 8 & 3/4SP — 3/4 AB 

ANIMATION & GRAPHICS 

DUPLICATION 

TRANSFERS from HI8 to BETA 



Phone (212) 219-9240 
Fax (212) 966-5618 



w 









Learn 

Film 

Making 

in Vermont 



u . 







B.A. Degree program. 

Learn from successful independent 

filmmakers in beautiful Burlington. 

Vermont. Call for more information. 



J w!/? Burlington 

lh'/>t MM, 95 Worth Ave. Burlington VT 05401 
1-800-862-9616 www. burkol.edu 



»~^~-l-~ = *V » ^ 



The Foundation for Independent Video and Film (FIVF), the educational affiliate 
of the Association for Independent Video and Filmmakers (AIVF), supports a variety 

of programs and services for the independent 
media community, including publication of The 
Independent and operation of the Festival Bureau, 
seminars and workshops, and an information clearing house. None of this work would 
be possible without the generous support of the AIVF membership and the following 
organizations: 



Academy Foundation 

City of New York Department of Cultural Affairs 

The Man 1 Duke Biddle Foundation 

Home Box Office 

Heathcote Art Foundation 

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation 

Jerome Foundation 



NYSCA 



Albert A. List Foundation, Inc. 

John D. and Catherine T MacArthur Foundation 

National Endowment for the Arts 

New York State Council on the Arts 

The Rockefeller Foundation 

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the 
Visual Arts, Inc. 



We also wish to thank the following individuals and organizational members: 

Business/Industry Members: CA: White Night Productions Inc.; CO: BET Movies/Starz!3; 
Intrepid Film 6k Video Inc.; FL: Thunder Head Productions; Respectable Street Inc.; GA: 
Legacy Pictures Inc.; MA: Blackside Inc.; MI: Jes 6k Woodcraft Video Prod. Inc.; MO: Wild 
Pictures, LLC; NC: Richard Ward; NJ: Galarza 6k Associates, Inc.; NV: United Pictures; 
NY: Asset Pictures; Bee Harris Productions; The Bureau for At-Risk Youth; C 6k S 
International Insurance Brokers; Cando Entertainment; Catherine Carey; Dynamism; Fred 
Ellis; Engel Production; Ericson Media Inc; G Productions; LD Media Corp; Media 
Principia; Merci Entertainment, Inc; New Rican Filmmaker; One Such Films; Remez Corp; 
Sundance Channel LLC; Surf and Turf Films Inc.; Toolbox Animation; Tribune Pictures; 
Wonder Entertainment; PA: DUTV-Cable 54; RI: Treasure Chest Television; TX: Aries 
Productions; PBLK Com, Inc.; Texas World Television; VA: Henninger Media Services; 
WA: Junk Empire Motion Pictures; Spain: Sogecable 

Nonprofit Members: AZ: University of Arizona; Women's Studies/Northern Arizona 
University; CA: Filmmakers Alliance; IFP/West; Film Studies/UC Berkeley; ITVS; Jewish 
Film Festival; Media Resource Center; NAMAC; RJB Productions; USC School of Cinema 
TV; University of California; CO: Center for the Arts; CT: Film Fest New Haven; GA: 
Image Film Video Center; HI: Aha Punana Leo; University of Hawaii; IL: Community 
Television Network; The Art Institute of Chicago; Video Data Bank; Women In The 
Director's Chair; KY: Appalshop; Media Working Group; MA: Harvard Medical School; 
Long Bow Group Inc; Mass. College of Art; Northampton Film Festival; MD: Laurel Cable 
Network; MI: Ann Arbor Community Access TV; Ann Arbor Film Festival; Public Benefit 
Corp; WTVS Channel 56; MN: Bush Artist Fellowships; IFP/North; Intermedia Arts; 
Walker Arts Center; MO: Webster University; NC: Institute For Public Media Arts; NE: 
Ross Film Theater; NY: AARP New York State; ASCAP; Andy Warhol Foundation for 
Visual Arts, Inc.; Bluestocking Films, Inc.; Brooklyn Film Institute; Cinema Arts Centre; 
Communications Society; Cornell Cinema; Creative Capital Foundation; Crowing Rooster 
Arts; Dyke TV Productions; Film Forum; Films for Educators; Ford Foundation; 
Guggenheim Museum Soho; John Jay High School; Learning Matters; Magnetic Arts, Inc.; 
Manhattan Neighborhood Network Museum of Modern Art; National Video Resources; 
New York Women In Film and Television; Open Society Institute; Opposable Thumb Prod., 
Inc; Paul Robeson Fund/Funding Exchange; Rochester Film Office; Ross-Gafney; Squeaky 
Wheel; SUNY/Buffalo Dept. Media Studies; Syracuse University; Third World Newsreel 
Upstate Films, Ltd.; WKSG Public Television 6k Radio; WNET/13; Women Make Movies 
OH: Athens Center For Film 6k Video; Cincinnati Community Video; Cleveland Filmmakers 
Flick Clique; Ohio Independent Film Festival; Ohio University-Film; OR: Communications 
Arts, MHCC; Northwest Film Center; PA: Carnegie Museum of Art; New Liberty 
Productions; Council On The Arts; Philadelphia Film/Video Assoc; Scribe Video 
Center;Temple U./Dept. of Media Arts; Univ. of the Arts; RI: Flickers Arts Collaborative; 
SC: South Carolina Arts Commission; TN: Nashville Independent Film Fest; TX: Austin 
Cinemaker Coop; Austin Film Society; Detour Film Foundation; Museum of Fine Arts, 
Houston; Southwest Alternate Media Project; Texas Film Commmission; U of Texas Dept. 
Radio-TV-Film; Worldfest Houston; WI: Madison Film Forum; Mexico: Centro De 
Capacitacion Cinematografica; Australia: Clememger Harvie; Canada: Video Pool; York 
University;Reach Foundation Norway: Hogskulen I Volda/Biblioteket; Singapore: Ngee 
Ann Polytechnic Library * 



62 THE INDEPENDENT April 1999 




The Millennium Campaign Fund is a 
3-year initiative to develop a $150,000 

cash re- 
serve fund 
for the Foundation for Independent 
Video and Film by our 25th anniversary 
in the year 2000. Since its inauguration 
in 1997, we have raised more than 
$91,000. 

Our heartfelt thanks to all those who 
have so generously donated to the 
Millennium Campaign Fund'. 

Corporate/Government/ 
Foundation Contributors 

BET/Encore; District Cahlevision; Home 
Box Office; New York State Council on 
the Arts; Washington DC Film Society. 

Honorary Committee Members 

(gifts of $500 or more) 
AIVF DC Salon; Ralph Arlyck; Peter 
Buck/C-Hundred Film Corp.; C&S 
International Insurance Brokers; Hugo 
Cassirer/ Felix Films; Martha Coolidge, 
Linda & Boh Curtis; Richard Linklater/ 
Detour Film Foundation; Loni Ding; 
Jacqueline Donnet; Karen Freedman & 
Roger Weisberg; David Haas; Henry 
Hampton; Nik Ives; Bill Jersey; Jewish 
Communal Fund; Leonard Merrill Kurz; 
Richard Kylberg; Tom LeGoff; Helaine 6k 
Sidney Lemer; Ruhy Lerner; Juan 
Mandelbaum; John Bard Manulis; Diane 
Markrow; Jim McKay/C-Hundred Film 
Corp.; Sheila Nevins; David & Sandy 
Picker; Sarah E. Petit/ R.E.M. Athens 
LLC; Barbara Roberts; James Schamus; 
Robert L. Seigel; Liza Vann Smith; 
Miranda Smith; Michael Stipe; Ann 
Tennenbaum; Tower Records/Videos/Books; 
Walterry Insurance Co.; Marc N. Weiss & 
Nancy Meyer; Robert E. Wise; Susan 
Wittenberg. 

We also wish to thank the individuals 
and organizations who have recently 
made or renewed generous donations of 
$100 or more as MCF FRIENDS (12/15/98 

to 2/15/99): 

David H. Brown; Barry Ellsworth; 
Matthew & Katie Heineman; Jodi Magee; 
Camila Motta; Robert Richter; Robin 
Schanzebach. 




Everything 
included. 

Avid Media 

Composer Off-line 

at rates the artist 

can afford. 



kitchen 



Y N 



225 Lafayette, suite 1113, Soho 
Tel: (516) 810-7238 • Fax (516) 421-6923 



Media 100 Suites 

(with or without editor) 

beta sp - 3/4" - Hi8 - VHS - SVHS 

2d /3d Graphics Design 

photoshop, illustrator, 
after effects, electricimage 

Voice-over Booth 
Internet and CD-ROM 

integration of your video projects 
into web pages and cd-rom. 



Medialuna 
Productions 

636 broadway, suite 214 

tel. 212.228.1133 

fax 212.228.1101 

www.medialuna.com 



MASTER OF ARTS IN 



Media Studies 



at The New School 



To request a catalog or 
attend an open house 

[call: 212-229-5630 x225 



www.newschool.edu/mediastudies/inFo63 



New School University 

The New School 

66 West 12th Street New York NY iooii 



The New School Master oF Arts 
in Media Studies program oFFers a 
unique combination oF media theory, 
criticism and production in the media 
capital oF the world. Study the hitory 
and philosophy oF communication 
while producing Film, audio, video and 
multimedia in our new state-oF-the- 
art Facilities. Join more than 300 
graduate students From 30 countries 
and 25 states in the original Media 
Studies Program. Earn your M.A. on 
campus, online at our cyberspace 
campus, or both on site and online. 




ARYLOOKOF 





DuART PROUDLY INTRODUCES ITS COMPLETELY RENOVATED + REENGINEERED DIGITAL AUDIO MIXING + 
EDITING SUITES FEATURING THE EUPHONIX CS3000 FULLY-AUTOMATED CONSOLE, DISCRETE 6-CHANNEL 
MONITORING, AND NON-LINEAR PLAYBACK AND RECORD. THESE ROOMS ARE SPECIFICALLY TAILORED 

TOWARD TODAYS FILM AND TV AUDIO REQUIREMENTS WHILE REMAINING ABSOLUTELY COST-EFFECTIVE. 



EUPHONIX CS300 AUTOMATED MIXER 

5.1 SURROUND SOUND MONITORING 

32 TRACKS AKAI DD8 DIGITAL DUBBERS 

DA-88 DIGITAL AUDIO DECKS 

16-CHANNEL PROTOOLS 

35MM/16MM FILM + VIDEO PROJECTION 

SOUND DESIGN/EDITORIAL SUITE 
WITH DEDICATED PROTOOLS 

FULLY-NETWORKED AUDIO INTERCHANGE 



0>y?ri 



DUART FILM AND VIDEO THE LATEST TECHNOLOGY FOR MAXIMUM CREATIVITY 

245 WEST 55TH ST. NY, NY 10019 T: 800 52DUART F: 212 757 5774 E: SALES (a DUART.COM 




ACN 



I 




A4/^t\IN© 




WRITE - SHOOT - DIRECT - EDIT 

YOUR OWN SHORT FILMS IN OUR HANDS-ON EIGHT WEEK INTENSIVE 
TOTAL IMMERSION PROGRAMS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH LITTLE OR NO PRIOR 

FILMMAKING EXPERIENCE. WORK WITH 16MM ARRIFLEX CAMERAS IN 
SMALL CLASSES DESIGNED AND TAUGHT BY AWARD-WINNING INSTRUCTORS. 



summer wccrsncp$ LOCATED at 



NEW YORK CITY PRINCETON & YALE UNIVERSITY 

UCLA CAMPUS - LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

PARIS, FRANCE ROME, ITALY 

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY, CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND 

SUMMER WORKSHOPS LOCATION ONLY - FOUR AND SIX WEEK. 



ADVANCED DIRECTING WORKSHOPS ALSO AVAILABLE 

NEW WORKSHOPS START THE FIRST MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH IN NEW YORK CITY ALL YEAR ROUND 



All workshops are solely owned and operated by the New York Film Academy 



NEW ^©CK FILM ACADCMy 

100 EAST 17TH STREET NYC 10003 TEL: 212-674-4300 FAX: 212-477-1414 
WEB PAGE: www.nyfa.com E-MAIL: film@nyfa.com 



A S S D C 



. 



T I N D F INDEPENDENT VI 



u 



D AND FILMMAKERS 



I 



!\ 



"When i was 
a graduate 
ilm student at 
I'd ride my i 
o AfVF and sit 

in their librar 
ieckin$ out books. 
Fifteen years lati 
till consider myself a 
independen/<filmm 

id i think of/AIVF a 
the independent 
filmmaker's best friend 

and^resource." 



. V 4/ 



/ 



40 Acr 






^A 



PliDto: Tom LeGoff 



TOTALLY INDEPENDENT 




Design: Nik Ives 



■ Contribute to the Foundation for Independent Video and Film's thrEe yEar Millennium Campaign Fund which ensures that AIVF/FIVF (publishers ™ 
of The Independent) not only survive, but thrive in their mission to serve the growing and diverse independent media community. 



Name. 



Enclosed is my gift of independence 

in the amount of: 



Address. 
City 



State . 



Zip. 



Home Phone. 



Business Phone . 



I /We wish to be listed in acknowledgements as: 



J $35 
J $50 
J $100 
J Other 



_| $150 
_| $2Q[ 
J 



and up 
Honorary 
Committee 
Member 



Make your check payable to FIVF and return it with this form to FIVF. 304 Hudson St.. Gth Floor. NY. NV 10013. For more information call (2121 807-1400. ext. 223. 
The Foundation for Independent Video and Film is a not-for-profit organization- Your contributinn is tax-deductible. 



MAY 1999 



A Publication of The Foundation for Independent Video and Film www.aivf.org 



1 






ILM& VIDEO MO 




/ 






m 



PBS Goes 



S3.95 us S5.25 can 



74470 n 801U 






Robert X. Cringely, host of PBS's Digital TV: A Cringely Crash Course 



INDIES ON 
PUBLIC TV 

16 Showcases 
TV Euro Style 
Films for the 
'jmanities & 
Sciences 



TELESCRIPTION LIBRARY • STUDIO 54 LIBRARY • PATHE NEWS, INC. • THE BIG PICTUI 



--: 



rmm 




Select from the greatest sources on the planet! 

Over 30,000 hours of historic footage 

and musical performance clips. 

Transferred, databased, copyright-cleared 

and instantly available! 



A Century of Images 







AMERICANA • COMMERCIALS 

NEWSREELS • VINTAGE TELEVISION 

BEAUTY SI IOTS • SLAPSTICK 

I IOLLYWOOD FLA TURKS 

WILDLIFE • NATURE 

COUNTRY & WESTERN 

ROCK & ROLL • JAZZ & BLUES 




STOCK FOOTAGE LIBRARY 

Call For Free Demo Reel • 1-800-249-1940 • 516-329-9200 • 516-329-9260 fax 
www.historicfilms.com • info@historicfilms.com 



£ CLASSIC COMEDY UBRARY • THE RHYTHM & BLUES AWARDS SHOW • STORYVILLE JAZZ COLLEG 



. '■?■.:; : :/■?*■' : 



, - 



1 ^" I _^f* 

■■•" 
TO HAVE PROVIDED LABORATORY SERVICES 

TO THESE SUN DANCE 199° * 

F//./W Festival Winners 



THREE SEASONSH%ny Bill 



GRAND JURY PRIZE, BEST DRAMATIC FILM 
AUDIENCE AWARD, BEST DRAMATIC FILM 
CINEMATOGRAPHY AWARD, DRAMATIC DIVISION 



AMERICAN MOVIE chris smith 

GRAND JURY PRIZE, BEST DOCUMENTARY 



JUDY BERLIN eric Mendelsohn 

DIRECTING AWARD, DRAMATIC DIVISION 






M X JOE THE KING FRANK WHALEY 

WALDO SALT SCREENWRITING AWARD 



THE BLACK PRESS: SOLDIERS 
WITHOUT SWORDS Stanley nelson 

FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION AWARD 



gig 757 H580 800 52 DuRRT sales@DuHrt.i 



^Independent 

m a fom&vwxo monthly 



Publisher: Elizabeth Peters 

Editor in Chief: Patricia Thomson 
leditor@aivf.org] 

Managing Editor: Paul Power 
(independent@aivf.orgl 

Listings Editor: Scott Castle 
lfestivals@aivf.org] 

Intern: Gesha-Mane Bryant 

Contributing Editors: Richard Baimbridge, Michelle Coe, 

Lissa Gibbs, Mark J. Huisman, Gary 0. Larson, Cara Mertes, 

Barbara Bliss Osborn, Rob Rownd, Robert L. Seigel, Esq. 

Design Director: Daniel Christmas 
lstartree@xsite.netl 

Advertising Director: Laura D. Davis 

(212)807-1400x225: 

ldisplayads@aivf.org] 

Advertising Rep: Scott Castle 

(212)807-1400x233; 

lscott@aivf.org] 

Articles from The Independent are archived online at 
lwww.elibrary.com] 



May 1999 

VOLUME 22, NUMBER 4 www.aivf.org 



r 






National Distribution: Total Circulation 

(Manhattan) (201) 342-6334; 

Ingram Periodicals (800) 627-6247 

Printed in the USA by Cadmus Journal Services 

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: 
The Independent Film & Video Monthly, 304 Hudson St., 6 ft. NY, NY 10013. 

The Independent Film & Video Monthly (ISSN 0731-5198) is published month- 
ly except February and September by the Foundation for Independent Video and Film 
(FIVF), a nonprofit, tax-exempt educational foundation dedicated to the promotion of 
video and film. Subscription to the magazine ($55/yr individual; $35/yr student; 
$100/yr nonprofit organization; $150/yr business/industry) is included in annual 
membership dues paid to the Association of Independent Video and Filmmakers 
(AIVF), the national trade association of individuals involved in independent film and 
video Library and school subscriptions are $75/yr Contact: AIVF, 304 Hudson St, 6 
fl., NY, NY 10013, (212) 807-1400; fax: (212) 463-8519; independent@aivf.org; 
www.aivforg Periodical Postage Paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing 
offices. 

Publication of The Independent is made possible in pari with public funds from the 
New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, and the National Endowment for 
the Arts, a federal agency. Publication of any advertisement in The Independent 
does not constitute an endorsement. AIVF/FIVF are not responsible for any claims 
made in an ad. 

Letters to The Independent should be addressed to the editor. Letters may be edit- 
ed for length. All contents are copyright of the Foundation for Independent Video and 
Film, Inc. Reprints require written permission and acknowledgement of the article's 
previous appearance in The Independent The Independent is indexed in the 
Alternative Press Index. 

© Foundation for Independent Video and Film, Inc. 1999 
AIVF/FIVF staff: Elizabeth Peters, executive director, Michelle Coe, program & infor- 
mation services director, LaTrice Dixon, membership/advocacy associate; Eugene 
Hernandez, webmaster; Jodi Magee, development consultant; Jessica Perez, admin- 
istrative director; Marya Wethers, membership assistant. 

AIVF/FIVF legal counsel: Robert I. Freedman, Esq.. Leavy, Rosensweig & Hyman 

AIVF/FIVF Board of Directors: Loni Ding (co-president), Lee Lew-Lee, Graham Leggat, 
Ruby Lerner*, Peter Lewnes, Richard Linklater, Cynthia Lopez*, Diane Markrow (sec- 
retary), Jim McKay, Robb Moss (chair), Elizabeth Peters (ex officio), Robert Richter 
(treasurer), James Schamus*. Valerie Soe, Barton Weiss (co-president). 
* FIVF Board of Directors only 



25 High Definition, Low Profile: PBS Enters the Digital Age 

In November, some 40 public TV stations quietly began digital broadcasting. Here's an overview of 
HDTV, SDTV, enhanced TV, datacasting, and other elements that figure in the digital future of PBS. 
by Gary O . Larson 

28 Over There! WDR in Germany and French Public TV 

In the U.S., commercial television had a two-decade headstart on public TV. In Europe, conversely, the 
private channels are the newcomers. Has this made a difference in how public stations have responded 
to increasing commercial competition? Two industry observers take a look overseas. 
by Claus Mueller & Bethany Ha ye 

32 PBS Potluck: A Sampling of Acquisition Series 

While most filmmakers are familiar with PBS's documentary series PO.V, there are a number of other 
independent acquisition series on public television, as this selection demonstrates. 

by Scott Castle 




2 THE INDEPENDENT May 1999 




Upfront 



7 News 

A conversation with NEA chair 
William Ivey after a year on the job. 
by Max Alvarez 



11 Profiles 

Laurel Ladevich, Stevan M. Smith, 
Loretta Todd 

by Isabel Sadurni, 
Andy Spletzer & 
Cara Mertes 




erdatn Film Festival and the Berlinale. 
Mueller 




FAQ & Info 

38 Distributor FAQ 

Though unknown to many documentary makers, Films for the Humanities 
and Sciences is nonetheless North America's largest supplier of videos and 
CD-ROMs to schools, colleges, and libraries. 

BY LlSSA GlBBS 




40 Funder FAQ 

Bringing independently produced 
programs to public television since 
1991, ITVS looks toward the future 

by Michelle Coe 

44 Festivals 
48 Notices 
52 Classifieds 




@AIVF 



58 Events 

60 In & Out of Production 

61 Salons 



Coven Cybercolumnist 
Robert X. Cringley hosts 
PBS's guide to the digital 
future of television, Digital 
TV: A Cringley Crash Course, 
produced by Oregon Public 
Broadcasting and rebroad- 
cast on May 26. See Gary 0. 
Larson's feature story "High 
Definition, Low Profile" for 
what else PBS has in store. 
Photo courtesy PBS 



May 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 3 



School of VISUAL ARTS 



Film Blasters 

Peter Masters"^ WbrksllOpS 



Gordon Willis and 
Evan Lottman 



Directing: 
Peter Masterson 

July 6 -9, 1999 

A comprehensive overview of the 
director's role in the making of 
feature films. Masterson will screen 
selections of his work and discuss 
his directorial experiences. The 
director's collaboration with the pro- 
duction team and most importantly, 
the actor, will be examined in detail. 
Peter Masterson, director, screen- 
writer, actor. Feature films include: 
The Trip to Bountiful, Convicts, Night 
Game, Full Moon in Blue Water. Co 
author and codirector, The Best Little 
Whorehouse in Texas. 



Cinematography: 
Gordon Willis 

July 12 -15, 1999 

The cinematographer's role as visual 
storyteller is the focus of this seminar. 
Preparation, collaboration with the 
director, lighting design and framing 
will be discussed. Emphasis will be on 
the choices made in composing the 
frame and the relationship of those 
choices within a frame, from cut to cut 
and scene to scene. Willis will screen 
and discuss selections of his work. 
Gordon Willis, cinematographer. 
Feature films include: The Godfather; 
The Godfather, Part II; The Godfather, 
Part III; All the President's Men; 
Annie Hall. 



Editing: 
Evan Lottman 

July 19 -22, 1999 

This workshop offers participants the 
opportunity of having their films cri- 
tiqued by a master editor. Emphasis 
will be placed on: subtext of a scene, 
actor's performance, rhythm, pacing, 
the psychology of the cut and the art 
of seamless narrative storytelling 
through film editing. Lottman will 
also discuss the editing of selected 
scenes from his work. 
Evan Lottman, editor. Feature films 
include: Sophie's Choice, The 
MuppetsTake Manhattan, Presumed 
Innocent, Panic in Needle Park and 
The Exorcist, for which he received an 
Academy Award nomination. 




Participants are encouraged 
to bring in a short sample of 
their work for discussion; 
required for Editing Workshop. 



All workshops include 
4 sessions, 10:00am-4:00pm. 
Tuition: $1,000 per workshop 
or $2,500 for entire series. 
Limited to 20 participants. 
Housing is available. 




School of VISUAL ARTS 

209 East 23 Street. New York, Y> 10010-3994 
www.schoolofvisualait8.edu 



For more information contact: 

Matthew Fee 

Office of Continuing Education 

School of Visual Arts 

209 East 23 Street 

New York, NY 10010-3994 

Telephone: 212.592.2053 

Fax: 212.592.2060 

E-mail: 

mfee@adm.schoolofvisualarts.edu 



1999, Visual Arts Press, Ltd. 



Tape-to-Fila Transfer 



Fi Im-to-Tape Transfer 



You 
shoot 



f 



o 
o 



o 



1 


't'l!^ ., 


.! ■ ^m \ 


/ 






• 1 Fi • i^l If v # 




n II rk ^ 1 1 

Eva i ■Br ^(^ Br SB 

mm ^m '■ I ■BIbBW ^^■M 








tion Pictur 


fwfWHKkm 


n^lHttt LAB 



23815 industrial park drive, farmington hills, mi 48335 • voice 248.474.3900 • fax 248.474.1577 



m: 



% 



*\ 






Nobody has the 20th Century covered with news footage like ABCNEWS VideoSource! 






*>i ( 



From the turn of the century to its approaching 
climax, the historical events that have shaped our 
times are mere fingertips away. 

Your Source for the 20th Century! 

Nobody in the footage business has as much 
news footage as ABCNews VideoSource! We've combined 
three of the world's finest news and stock footage 
collections - ABC News, Worldwide Television News, 



and British Movietone News - at America's newest 
and most modern footage resource. If it happened from 
1900 right up to today, we've got it covered! 

The great thing is, it's all so easy to access. 
Just click us up on the Web or, even better, come visit 
our fantastic facility in person. Our highly-skilled 
and footage-sawy Customer Service Representatives 
will simplify your search. It's footage searching the 
way it should be! 



For the fastest, easiest way to find 
the exact footage you want, come to the Source! 

©ABCNEWS 

VideoSource 

125 West End Avenue at 66th Street • New York, NY 10023 
800 • 789 • 1250 • 212 • 456 • 5421 • FAX 212 • 456 • 5428 

Visit http://www.abcnewsvsource.com 



©1998 



ARTS FUNDING 



EDITED BY PAUL POWER 



NEWS 



One Year at the Helm 

A Talk with the NEAs William Ivey 



One year ago, William J. Ivey was quietly 
confirmed by the United States Senate as the 
seventh Chair of the bruised and battered 
National Endowment for the Arts. Ivey's 
appointment occurred just as the dust was 
starting to settle from a decade-long assault 
against the government-funded arts agency by 
congressional critics who had targeted contro- 
versial works by individual artists receiving 
NEA grants. 

In 1996, when Ivey's predecessor, Jane 
Alexander, was fighting what appeared to be a 
futile effort to keep the NEA alive, Congress 
slashed 40 percent from the endowment's bud- 
get. The newly Republican-controlled Con- 
gress also demanded the elimination of most 
individual grants. This was seen as a blatant 
attempt to prevent artists whose work did not 
reflect the neo-conservative values of Congress 
from receiving any further public arts subsidies. 
There was even serious talk in the House and 
Senate of shutting down the endowment 
entirely. 

Still, the NEA has managed to survive, due 
in no small part to the efforts of artists and arts 
organizations lobbying tirelessly on its behalf. 
When The Independent paid a brief visit to 
Chairman Ivey's office in the Old Post Office 
building on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washing- 
ton, DC, he did not seem phased by the tumul- 
tuous events of the past several years. A soft- 
spoken man, the 53-year-old Michigan native 
served as Director of the Country Music 
Foundation in Nashville, from 1971 until his 
NEA appointment. 

Ivey's work history includes stints as a folk- 
lorist, musician, teacher, and writer, and is fur- 
ther enhanced by his having chaired or served 
on 15 different endowment grant panels during 
the past two decades. With Midwestern roots, 
Southern job experience, and degrees in histo- 
ry, folklore, and ethnomusicology, Ivey seems 
the ideal NEA figurehead to fend off any fur- 
ther Capitol Hill attempts to penalize the arts 
in the United States. 

Considerable attention is now focused on 
Ivey to determine whether he will have the 
diplomacy and temerity to convince a previous- 
ly hostile Congress to restore individual NEA 
grants to future endowment budgets. In his 
conversation with The Independent, Ivey 




expressed considerable optimism about the 
future of individual grants, although he admit- 
ted the agency would need to conduct research 
and studies prior to overcoming necessary con- 
gressional hurdles. [Editor's note: On March 9th, 
after this interview was conducted, Ivey made his 
first foray into controversy by withdrawing a 
$7,500 grant from an El Paso publisher, Cinco 
Puntos. Ii^e;y was concerned that funds for an apo- 
litical children's book, The Story of Colors, might 
end up in the hands of Zapatista rebels, since its 
author, Subcomaiidante Marcos, is one of the rebel 
leaders.] 

What are your thoughts on the future of individual 
grants? 

I'm optimistic. However, there are two pieces 
to it that need to be accomplished and are like- 
ly to slow the process down a bit. One is that 
Congress told us legislatively not to give grants 
to individual artists, so that means when we 
come up with a good plan on how to get back 
into the business of working with individual 
artists directly we will have to go to Congress, 
explain it to them — it'll have to make sense to 
them — and there will have to be change in our 
legislation. Second, one of the things I really 
want the agency to do is proceed according to 
research, studies, and specific plans. So, one of 



the things we need to do over the next 18 
months to two years is determine just what is 
the situation of the individual artist in our cre- 
ative economy. How much does it vary from 
field to field? [How can] we help, given the 
nature and size of our resources, to advance the 
careers of individual artists? When we have 
that information, then we can go to Congress 
and say, "Here is a study that points to the 
dimension of the real problem. Here is the 
endowment's strategy for addressing that prob- 
lem," while continuing to be aware of the con- 
cerns of Congress. 

What is NEA's commitment to film/video art at this point? 
It's a substantial commitment. You have within 
the entire film [arena] — particularly if you 
include film that makes its way onto televi- 
sion — some of the issues that affect other parts 
of the arts spectrum. You have some arts that 
are very expensive and others that are less 
expensive, some that involve a lot of outreach 
through distribution channels, others that are 
almost cottage industries, both in the way 
they're developed and the way they're distrib- 
uted. So you're probably talking about a couple 
of million dollars as the total for '98 [media 
grants]. The commitment in total is pretty 
large, but just as our commitment to music is 
large, it ranges from very expensive opera pro- 
ductions to small chamber music residencies. 
Total dollars might be vast, but when applied to 
individual sections might be smaller. 

How solid is NEA funding beyond Clinton and should 
mediamakers be concerned about a possible climate 
of retrenchment from potential grantgivers? 

I would say no. I may be unreasonably opti- 
mistic, but I think there have been some very 
strong signs in the last six, eight months that 
indicate the agency has truly turned a corner in 
its relationship with Congress. That has 
occurred for a variety of reasons. But the most 
tangible evidence of that change is that last 
year we had two very supportive votes in 
Congress (one in each house) in which funding 
for the agency was preserved by overwhelming 
majorities. So far in my meetings with members 
of Congress, we are not talking at all about 
eliminating the agency or cutting the agency 
back, not at all. We're really just talking about 
[how] some would like flat funding and others 
would like us to move forward. Of course, we 
would like to move forward because we think 
we have a great plan. But I do think that the 
strength of the economy, the strength and sup- 
port that coalesced around the NEA when its 
existence was really threatened a couple of 
years ago, and the fact that the hard-edged pol- 



May 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 7 



J 



SUMMER I 

AT ANTIOCH COLLEGE 






• It • 




June 2 through August 19 
Intensive study institutes in: 

Documentary 
Entrepreneurship 
Language (French, Spanish, 

Japanese and Swahili) 
Music 

Peace Studies 
Theater/Dance 



The 1 999 Summer Documentary 
Institute (June 29 through July 23) 
will be an intensive experience of 
screenings, audio events and 
individual and group presentations 
by internationally distinguished 
documentarians and scholars 
focusing on the theme 
Resistance and Transformation: 
The Latin American Documentary. 





795 UVERMORE STREET YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO 45387 



Highlights of the Institute will include: 

■ Intensive interaction with award winning 
documentarians 

■ Major work from the 60s and 70s 

■ Contemporary work 
u The power and production of grassroots media 
u Film, video, audio and photography formats 

■ Work from First Nation people 

Documentaries from: 

Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Cuba 
and Mexico. 

Call us toll-free at 1-800-543-9436 for more details 
about the summer institutes and courses. 

View our website at http://antioch-college.edu 



POES YOUR UBRARY 

HAVE THE 

INDEPENDENT? 

Take this coupon to your 
school or public librarian and 
request a subscription today! 

10 issues/year 

Library subscription rate $75 

($90 foreign) 

Published by the Foundation for 

Independent Video and Film 

ISSN 0731-0589 

Order from FIVF, 

304 Hudson St., 6th FL, New York, NY 10013; 

(212) 807-1400 x222; members@aivf.org 

EBSCO: (205) 991-6600 

fax: (205) 991-1479 

Faxon US: (800) 283-2966; 

Canada (519) 472-1005 
(Can) fax: (519) 472-1072 



Get these essential books delivered right to your doof 

Liquidation Special on AIVF/FIVF books 

The ATVF/FIVF Guide to International Film & Video Festivals 

Kathryn Bowser, ed.; $17 $ 

The AFVFIFFVF Guide to Film & Video Distributors 

Kathryn Bowser, ed.; $12 $ 

The Next Step: A Film and Video Distribution Handbook 

Morrie Warshawski, ed.; $12 $ 

OR...order all three for just $30 and save! $ 

Alternative Visions: Distributing Independent Video 

in a Home Video World Debra Franco; $9.95 $ 

Contracts for the Film & Television Industry 

Mark Litwak; $29.95 $ 

Director's Journey Mark Travis; $26.95 $ 

Directing Actors: Creating Memorable Performances 

for Film and TV Judith Weston; $26.95 $ 

Film and Video Budgets Michael Wiese; $26.95 $ 

Film and Video Financing Michael Wiese; $22.95 $ 

Film and Video Marketing Michael Wiese; $18.95 $ 

Film Directing Shot by Shot: Visualizing from Concept 

to Screen Steven D. Katz; $24.95 $ 

Film Directing Shot by Shot: Cinematic Motion 

Steven D. Katz; $24.95 $ 

The Independent Film & Videomakers Guide (2nd Ed.) 

Michael Wiese; $29.95 $ 

Persistence of Vision: An Impractical Guide 

to Producing a Feature Film For Under $30,000 

John Gaspard & Dale Newton; $26.95 $ 

Production Assistant Guidelines Sandy Curry; $6.00 $ 

The Search for Reality: The Art of 

Documentary Filmmaking Michael Tobias, ed; $29.95 $ 

Surviving Production: The Art of 

Production Management Deborah Patz; $26.95 $ 

The Writer's Journey (2nd Ed.) 

Christopher Vogler; $22.95 $ 

Postage/handling: (surface mail) 

US - $3.50 1st book, $1.00 ea. addl 

Foreign - $5.00 1st book, $1.50 ea. addl $ 



TOTAL 

Make checks payable to FIVF, and send order to: 

304 Hudson St., 6th Fl., New York, NY 10013; or charge by phone: 

(212) 807-1400 x303; fax: (212) 463-8519, or our website: www.aivf.org. 

Look for our new self-distribution resource books coming soon! 




itics of anger have been softened or blended to 
a certain extent. All of that combined gives us 
good reason to be optimistic about the future of 
the agency. I know that Vice President Gore is 
very supportive, and I would think that the way 
the agency is operating, the way we are pre- 
senting our goals, our strategies, give every 
indication that we're going to have strong sup- 
port on a bipartisan basis regardless of who will 
be in the White House or despite what the pre- 
cise composition of Congress will be. So film- 
makers and other artists or arts organizations 
should at this time be looking forward to a 
brighter future and one in which the ability of 
the agency to support work around the country 
should increase. 

How do you see the Artsreach program (which pro- 
vides grants to remote or underpopulated regions in 
the 20 states receiving the smallest NEA grants) 
affecting film- and videomakers? 

In retrospect, Artsrearch is almost a pilot for 
aggressive access programming on the part of 
the endowment. Artsrearch was targeted at 20 
states that have received the smallest number 
of direct grants (five or fewer), and as a result it 
has a very strong emphasis on mostly geograph- 
ically remote or underpopulated areas. As we 
move into Challenge America — which has 
some elements of Artsrearch preserved in it — 
we're going to continue to be aggressive about 
access, about helping small communities and 
rural areas to begin to develop their own arts 
infrastructures. We're also going to work with 
neighborhoods within communities, under- 
served parts of urban districts. 

Organizations that deal with video could be 
a significant part of what happens in this kind 
of access programming. A good example would 
be the congruence between afterschool pro- 
gramming for young people on the need for 
media literacy and the availability of media pro- 
fessionals at the community level. I think 
there's enough demand and enough of a clear 
need that that could be a significant area of 
activity, just at that level of the smaller grants 
made to areas that have historically been 
underserved. 

What are your thoughts regarding mediamakers 
working to achieve the same goals as the NEA? 

There are two or three areas where I think the 
agency can work with filmmakers. One of them 
is an area that is of great personal interest to 
me, coming out of country music and not-for- 
profit and [having] dealt with the commercial 
industry. I'd really be interested in how the 
agency can help strengthen and make more 
meaningful the relationship between artists and 



organizations and operating not-for-profits and 
those that are operating in a commercial envi- 
ronment. Obviously, there's a flow in the media 
and in the filmmaking area, probably in both 
directions, but I know there's a striving in many 
cases to leave the not-for-profit realm and con- 
nect with the larger budgets, the larger reach of 
the commercial industry. 

I also think the area of film preservation is 
one where we can get together. I'm most famil- 
iar with the difficulties of preserving the master 
tapes of audio recording sessions. Way too 
many recordings are not in archives or even in 
corporate vaults but are really on the shelves of 
the homes of the independent record producers 
who developed certain projects. I'm confident 
that exactly the same thing pertains in media 
and in film whereby the independent producer 
has a wonderful project and yet the key raw 
material — and sometimes even most of the 
prints or duplicates — end up in their home or 
in a few boxes in the basement. I think that 
addressing issues of preservation of our cultural 
heritage through cooperative efforts and link- 
ing the not-for-profit, small independent com- 
pany or individual, with the bigger firms that 
have archives and also have many problems 
with preservation could be an area where we 
would be willing to work with all aspects of the 
film industry, for-profit and not-for-profit. 

There is also the matter of bringing the arts 
to young people. There is probably no art form, 
particularly if it is carried out using the most 
contemporary digital technology, that would 
have a more instant appeal and resonance with 
young beginners than film and media. I think 
that as the endowment begins more aggressive- 
ly to work with the arts, to really create a bet- 
ter America tor all American citizens, filmmak- 
ing should be right in the middle of that. 

What you hope is that with digital technol- 
ogy coming along, it would first of all make it 
cheaper and easier for creative people to work 
and then maybe we would be able to get a sys- 
tem of distribution that would allow people to 
audition their creative work for audiences with- 
out as many layers and mediaries as exist now 
or existed in the past. [Hopefully] that same 
digital technology can help preserve historical 
work and make it available to young people so 
we can really have a generation of young peo- 
ple who have a substantially better media liter- 
acy than somebody from my generation had. 

Max Alvarez is Film Coordinator at the 

National Museum oj Women in the Arts in 

Washington, DC, a film critic for The Washington 

Diplomat, and assists in the coordination of film 

programs for The Smithsonian Associates. 



National 
Educational 
Media 
Network 



*? 




supporting excellence in 
educational media 

Presents 

Content '99 



13th Annual Media Market 

Conference & Festival 

May 19-22, 1999 

Airport Hilton Hotel 

Oakland, CA 

The Nation's Only Event Exclusively for 
Educational Media Professionals 

Media Market 

May 19-21 

The best, low-cost way to find a 

distributor for works-in-progress or 

finished productions 

Submission Deadlines: 

Early Bird: March 15 

Final: April 27 

Conference 

May 20-21 

Learn the latest trends in production, 

distribution & exhibition 

Early Bird Deadline: April 19 



Apple Awards 
Film & Video Festival 

May 21 -22 

A curated selection of Apple Award winners 

at the Oakland Museum of California 



"The Media Market was key in securing 

distribution. Meeting so many distributors 

face to face was invaluable. I will definitely 

be back with my next film!" 

Lisa Leeman, Fender Philosophers 



NEMN 

655 Thirteenth St., Suite 100 

Oakland, CA 94612-1220 

PH: 510.465 6885 FX: 510.465.2835 

E-Mail: content@nemn.org 

www.nemn.org 



May 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 9 




ACN 



T 




MAriNC 



X mm 




WRITE • SHOOT • DIRECT • EDIT 

YOUR OWN SHORT FILMS IN OUR HANDS-ON EIGHT WEEK INTENSIVE 
TOTAL IMMERSION PROGRAMS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH LITTLE OR NO PRIOR 

FILMMAKING EXPERIENCE. WORK WITH 16MM ARRIFLEX CAMERAS IN 
SMALL CLASSES DESIGNED AND TAUGHT BY AWARD-WINNING INSTRUCTORS. 



SUMMER WCErSUCES LOCATED AT 



NEW YORK CITY PRINCETON & YALE UNIVERSITY 

UCLA CAMPUS - LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

PARIS, FRANCE ROME, ITALY 

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY, CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND 

SUMMER WORKSHOPS LOCATION ONLY - FOUR AND SIX WEEK. 



ADVANCED DIRECTING WORKSHOPS ALSO AVAILABLE 

NEW WORKSHOPS START THE FIRST MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH IN NEW YORK CITY ALL YEAR ROUND 



All workshops are solely owned and operated by the New York Film Academy 



NEW ^©K>tt ril_M ACADEMY 

100 EAST 17TH STREET NYC 10003 TEL: 212-674-4300 FAX: 212-477-1414 
WEB PAGE: www.nyfa.com E-MAIL: film@nyfa.com 



laurel J[adevich 



FLY GIRLS 



by Isabel Sadurni 



Outside the San Anselmo, California, 

office of Silverlining Productions, the company 
writer/producer Laurel Ladevich started five 
years ago, a late winter downpour has brought 
traffic to a slow roll. "Bad flying weather. I'm 
not sure how they'd maneuver through that," 
remarks Ladevich, "though they probably had 
to fly through worse." On a short break from 
editing her documentary Fly Girls, Ladevich 
speaks with pride about her most recent sub- 
jects, the Women Airforce Service Pilots 
( WASPs) , who were the first female pilots to fly 
for the U.S. in WWII. "They're unstoppable. 
Most of the women I spoke with for the film are 
in their seventies, and they're still leading very 
adventurous, unconventional lives. They could 
probably run circles around me." 

Ladevich's modesty is deceiving, masking a 
demonstrated capacity to excel during her 20- 
plus-year career in the male-dominated realm 
of special effects. She's carved out a livelihood 
working mostly with dramatic blockbusters, 
such as The Empire Strikes Back, Return of the 
]edi, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, and 
Jurassic Park. 

Now for the first time, Ladevich is producing 
a historical documentary. Though she co-pro- 
duced documentaries for others at the incep- 
tion of her career in California in the late sev- 
enties, this is her first solo maneuver as 
writer/producer. Initially a dramatic screen- 
play — one of several Ladevich had written dur- 
ing and after her time working with George 
Lucas at Industrial Light and Magic — Fly Girls 
caught the attention of a WGBH senior pro- 
ducer Susanne Simpson, with whom Ladevich 
had co-produced an Academy Award-nomi- 
nated IMAX feature for WGBH entitled 
Special Effects. 

"Susanne called me up and asked if I would 
be interested in doing this as a television docu- 
mentary. I had done so much homework for the 
drama, it was like, 'If you've got the money, I've 
got the time' kind of thing. So I wrote a prelim- 
inary treatment and went out to meet with 
them in New York, and we all decided that it 
would be a good thing to do. Actually, it all 
went very quickly." The ability to deliver the 
project in under a year was made possible by 
the ready $500,000 in funding from WGBH's 
American Experience series, as well as 




Ladevich's prior research — a deep excavation 
of archival materials for the development of her 
dramatic feature. 

Ladevich's feminine re-visioning of the 
familiar Hollywood trope of male-only war 
movies has generated much interest from major 
press, such as LIFE magazine, which plans to 
run a story on the film and the WASPs fea- 
tured. Ladevich isn't surprised. "It's a fascinat- 
ing topic," she says. "I mean, you have great 
role models in the film — hundreds of beautiful 
young, strong, intelligent women. You have fab- 
ulous vintage aircrafts, and you have World 
War II. These are things that I would say have 
tremendous appeal to men and women alike." 

The nostalgic anecdotes offered by female 
pilots, the vintage stills, and the archival 
footage lend the film a halcyon-days aura, as if 
it were a legend retold to aspiring upstarts gath- 
ered around the flight simulator. Yet certain 
aspects of the flight training program, started in 
Sweetwater, Texas, in 1942, haven't changed. 
The film documents the vast discrepancy 
between a woman's wage and a man's higher 
earnings, sexual harassment (the female pilots 
then called the men's training grounds "wolf 
swamp"), and sabotage (a fatal crash involving 
a WASP was later found to have been due to 
sugar dumped in the fuel) — all elements that 
reflect a persistent intolerance of women in the 
Armed Forces. But despite discrimination and 
other obstacles, the new WASP recruits 
accepted into the training program on "Aven- 
ger Field," the only all-female Air Force base in 
history, won over skeptics through their ability 
and courage. 



The most challenging 
part for Ladevich was writ- 
ing the voiceover. "I always 
wanted to go off writing in 
anecdotes, because there 
are so many interesting 
ones I've been told from 
the former WASPs, but 
American Experience was 
very consistent in their 
challenging me to adhere 
to a simple, clear story- 
line," she says. "And 
they're right." 

Conventional in its ap- 
proach to form, unspooling 
as a familiar documentary 
chain of archival footage 
with voiceover narration 
cutting to interview, Fly 
Girls is more importantly a gesture towards 
championing the legacy of the female pioneer 
spirit. Included in the historical footage are 
cameos of the legendary Jacqueline Cochran, 
America's foremost female aviator and the first 
woman to fly a bomber across the Atlantic 
Ocean. Several pilots interviewed for the film, 
continue as role models of the hearty adventur- 
ous spirit. One wrote regularly for the New York 
Times, another continues long-distance sailing 
with her husband, and still another owns and 
operates her own aviation company. 

"On a general level, I want the piece to go 
out there and offer another perspective on 
what women can do," says Ladevich. "These 
are woman who can do anything, and often did 
everything. They raised families, and they have 
careers. So to me, it's extraordinary not only 
what they did, but who they are." She adds, "I 
want the film to inspire people with regard to 
the contribution of women in World War II. 
There are great films out about WWII right 
now, but there's more to the picture than com- 
bat." Without feminizing war, Fly Girls offers 
several untold stories of women's heroism and 
proves the value of a high-flyin' pistol-packin' 
mama. 

Fly Girls airs on May 24 on PBS's American 
Experience. 

Isabel Sadumi is a San Francisco-based writer 

and filmmaker. Her first film portrait of a woman 

in non- traditional role, Mindy Ward, Welder, 

aired on KTEH in California. 



May 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 11 



m'h& 



LYRiaSTS/M.C.S 
POETS 

TURN 15 PAGES OF YOUR WORDS, 
RII¥MES,POEMS, INTO A SHORT FILM, 
MUSIC \TDEO OR FEATURE FHJM EXCERPT 



Stevan M Smith 

Kontum Diary: The Journey Home 







Scene from "Isolated Incidents" 
The film that takes police brutality head on! 

WW W.I sol a ted lncidente.com 

HOOK OR CROOK PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

PRESENTS 15 PAGES OF FAME 1999 

SCREENWRITERS PRODUCTION GRANT 

Deadline: August 2, 1999 

Grand Prize 
Production Deal 

$5,000 Cash 

Applications: 

www.l 5pages.com 

or SASE to: 

15 Pages 

P.O. Box 0070 

Madison Square Station 

New York, N.Y. 10159-0070 



by Andy Spletzer 




Sgt. Paul Reed fought with the 173rd 
Airborne in Vietnam. Not long after arriving in 
the central highlands in 1968, he wrote his par- 
ents, sending along a package of souvenirs he 
found in an enemy rucksack during a scouting 
mission. Twenty years later, back in Dallas, 
Texas, Reed's mom returned the package to 
him. Inside Reed found a diary by a North 
Vietnamese soldier he assumed he had killed, 
along with some photographs of his former 
enemy. Still dealing with unresolved issues sur- 
rounding the war, the diary became Reed's key 
to coming to terms with it. He would have the 
diary translated and, in a gesture of reconcilia- 
tion, present it to the soldier's family. But he 
needed help. 

Enter Stevan M. Smith, himself a veteran of 
two tours of duty in Vietnam with the Marines, 
from 1964-67. After his second tour, he went 
to school (mainly to meet girls, he says), and 
then, with a degree from Oregon State, he got 
a job working in TV news in Seattle. He had 
been doing that for 25 years when the oppor- 
tunity to make Two Decades and a Wakenp — in 
which he followed a Post Traumatic Stress 
therapy group back to Vietnam — for KCTS, 
the local PBS affiliate in Seattle. Initially, his 



boss at the news station gave him permission to 
take leave and work on the documentary. 
Then, one week before starting production in 
Vietnam, his boss had a change of heart and 
decided he didn't want an employee providing 
product for "the competition" — for PBS. So 
Smith quit. He now 
does freelance news 
pieces for the networks, 
documentaries for him- 
self, and lives in Des 
Moines, Washington, 
just outside of Seattle. 

Paul Reed had seen 
Two Decades and a 
Wakeup and contacted 
Smith for advice on 
getting background 
information about the 
diary out of Vietnam. 
During months of talk- 
ing back and forth with 
Reed, Smith pumped 
his contacts in Vietnam 
for bits of information. 
Meanwhile, the idea for 
Kontum Diary began to 
take form. Smith had 
the diary translated, 
which had been written 
in the form of Vietnamese poetry. It belonged 
to Lt. Ngiven van Nghia. Recalls Smith, "The 
poetry was . . . the only word I could use is sac- 
charine. Nevertheless, there were some real 
and interesting human revelations in there. I 
think for Paul, this American soldier, when he 
read the translation, he found a lot of his own 
feelings about the war." 

Finally, greasing the wheels by sending 
money to his contacts in Vietnam, Smith dis- 
covered that Nghia was still alive. Even better, 
he was willing to meet with Reed. Kontum 
Diary documents Reed's return to Vietnam and 
his emerging friendship with a man (and a 
country) he once considered his enemy. Made 
in part with a grant from ITVS (an organiza- 
tion about which Smith has nothing but good 
things to say), Kontum Diary was broadcast on 
PBS in 1994- Along with footage of the trip, 
shot on Beta SR the program includes snippets 
from the diary and super 8 footage from Reed's 
tour in Vietnam. 

But the story doesn't end there. 

Nghia was nearly blind because of injuries 

suffered during the war. After Nghia helped 

Reed to see metaphorically, Reed wanted to 

help Nghia see physically. He arranged for hos- 



12 THE INDEPENDENT May 1999 



PROFILES 



pitals in his native Dallas to donate time and 
resources to help, and then teamed up with 
Smith again, this time to arrange to bring 
Nghia and his son Dien to Dallas for the tests 
and surgery. Smith again brought out his cam- 
era and created a follow-up called Kontum 
Diary: The journey Home. The program con- 
denses the original hour-long show down to a 
half-hour, then adds Nghia's trip to Texas to fill 
out the rest. 

Some strange things happened during 
Kontum Diary: The journey Home. Nghia's eyes 
were inoperable, but he was able to get glasses 
to help him see. They built two weeks into 
their schedule as a recovery period and had 
some time to kill, so they decided to bring 
Nghia in for a physical. They found out he had 
a heart valve problem, which is currently being 
treated with medication. Meanwhile, Nghia's 
son, Dien, who came over to take care of him 
as he recuperated, detected into the night, 
which made Smtih and crew very unpopular 
back in Vietnam. That doesn't stop them from 
making yearly trips back in order to deliver 
Nghia his heart medication. 

Something Smith speaks out about is how 
the dehumanization of the enemy is one of the 
war's most detrimental effects on the individ- 
ual soldiers, particularly once the conflict is 
over and the governments' business relations 
resume. Says Smith, "You learn the enemy is a 
shadow in the dark, threatening and vicious, 
who loves to live in the jungle and lives to wipe 
you out. You don't think of this person as expe- 
riencing the same problems with leeches, or 
the same fear of tigers. You don't view this as a 
human being; he's a shadowy enemy who you 
put the crosshairs of a gun on, and you can ease 
your problems if you hit him." 

These lessons learned in war are difficult to 
unlearn. He notes, "Is this rehumanization 
process a big revelation? Not to a lot of people, 
but to a veteran who's been in combat, it's an 
important step. That's one of the things that 
motivated me to make this, is that they have to 
rehumanize their enemy and accept the idea 
that this is a human being. It's painful to do 
that. It hurts to do that. But it's absolutely crit- 
ical." Smith's documentary is an excellent 
example of just that sort of healing. 

Kontum Diary: The Journey Home airs on 
PBS on May 3 1 at 9 p.m. (check local listings) 

Andy Spletzer is film editor for The Stranger, 
Seattle's weekly alternative newspaper, and is 
working on a couple of short films that will proba- 
bly end up in one or two of this nation's finer 
underground film festivals. 




Northeast Negative Matchers, Inc. 



Your Avid Film Composer Matchback Specialists 



Negative cutting & Conforming 

y 35mm 
> 16mm 
V Super 16mm 



idustry 



ins< 



er vice 



th^T^enence! 



^leV *«* 



©413-736-2177 ^413-734-1211 • 800-370-CUTS 



25 Riverview Terrace 
Springfield, MA 01 108-1603 



www.nenm.com 
e-mail: nenm@nenm.com 



Film I Video Arts 



serving independents since 1968 




30th Anniversary Benefit 

Lincoln Center's Walter Reade Theater 
May 25, 1999 6 -10pm 

Honorees 

Film/Video Arts Co-Founder Rodger Larson 
New York State Council on the Arts 
Filmmaker Mira Nair (Mississippi Masala, Kama Sutra) 
Television Producer Tom Fontana {Homicide, Oz) 



celebrating 






for info. 

iTS 212.673.9361x18 



May 1999 THE INDEPENDENT 13 



loMta 




TODAY IS A GOOD DAY: 
REMEMBERING CHIEF DAN GEORGE 

by Cara Mertes 



"Filmmaking is a physical, spiritual, intel- 
lectual, and emotional act," says director 
Loretta Todd. "There has to be a spark to make 
you want to tell the story." Todd, a Canadian- 
Cree filmmaker, is always looking for that spark. 
Today Is a Good Day: Remembering Chief Dan 
George is her latest work. Commissioned for the 
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Biography 
series, the film aired in March, and chronicles 
the life of Dan George, one of the best known 
Native film actors in recent memory and Chief 
of the Tsleil-Waututh tribe. Starring in such 
modern classics as Little Big Man with Dustin 
Hoffman and The Outlaw Josie Wales with Clint 
Eastwood, George made film history by bringing 
strength and humor to counter the stereotypical 
images of Native people in Hollywood movies. 
He died in 1981. 

This is the first video the Vancouver-based 
Todd has produced for the CBC, Canada's pub- 
lic television system, although several others, 
including the award-winning Forgotten 
Warriors, have aired on the network. She has 
made over a dozen documentaries and short 
films on subjects ranging from WWII 
Aboriginal veterans to Native women artists to 
Native education in Canada. 

Todd heard about a new biography series 
being planned by the CBC and approached the 
George family, whom she knew through work- 
ing at the Chief Dan George Foundation years 
earlier. She was drawn to the story of Chief Dan 
George because "he reminded me of people I 
grew up with. He was someone [with] this 
tremendous charisma and this tremendous 
power to let the camera be intimate with him, 
but he was able to maintain a humility. That 
drew me on an emotional level." The CBC was 
also attracted to the idea and funded the pro- 
ject as part of its series. 

Todd has always been interested in a combi- 
nation of the glamorous and the mundane — of 
epic stories and sweeping sagas that involve 
history and politics, told through larger-than- 
life characters and the small details of life. 
"There are sometimes crescendos in our lives, 
but for the most part, there are these incre- 
ments" she says. "And sometimes you don't 
even realize how powerfully something is 



affecting you until afterwards." 

Growing up in Northern Alberta, Todd 
described being steeped in the magic of old 
Hollywood movies on late-night television. She 
has taken that childhood fascination and spent 




the better part of the last ten years building a 
career as a filmmaker. Perfecting the craft and 
exploring the storytelling aspects of filmmaking 
have been her two most important tasks, with 
storytelling the foundation for any film she 
makes. 

"There's a lot of talk about oral history and 
Native storytelling," Todd explains, "but it's 
really hard to quantify. Sometimes people try 
and it becomes almost didactic. Like, Native 
storytelling is a person by a fire telling a story, or 
Native storytelling is an eagle flying in the air. 
They've become cliches. People forget that the 
heart of storytelling is the emotional connec- 
tion." 

It is a connection made evident in Today Is a 
Good Day through Todd's focus on George's 
family life and, in particular, through the par- 
ticipation of his children in her film. Each had 
a close relationship to George and remembers 
good times as well as the difficult ones with 
great affection. They become vehicles to find 
out more about who Chief Dan George was. As 
Todd says, they allow the film to ask " 'What 
affected him.' What did he value.' What hurt 
him.' What made him laugh?' The family was 
the way I thought you could get a sense of who 



he was and open that up for the audience." 

Todd uses standard talking-head interviews, 
but also taped the family members as they sat 
with each other in a circle, exchanging memo- 
ries and impressions of their father. In these 
sequences, the trust and intimacy 
Todd had with the family shows in 
their naturalness and humor. Through 
their memories, we understand that 
George's life was varied and in many 
ways encapsulated the contradictions 
of being Native in a predominantly 
white culture. 

Born in 1899 near Vancouver, 
British Columbia, George eventually 
became Chief, working as a logger and 
a longshoreman most of his life. In 
middle-age, he became a performer on 
the Indian rodeo circuit. He didn't 
start film acting until he was 60 years 
old, appearing as a last-minute stand- 
in for someone who dropped out of a 
film his son was acting in. George stole 
the show, and the CBC subsequently 
hired him to star in the ground-break- 
ing fifties television series Caribou 
County, which was notable for its use 
of Native actors to play Native char- 
acters. Eleven years later, director 
Arthur Perm hired him to play Old 
Lodgeskins in Little Big Man, a role which won 
him Golden Globe and Oscar nominations. 

In later lite, George used his notoriety to 
become a well-known spokesperson for Native 
rights, an aspect of his life that Todd highlights 
in the film. This is a theme that consistently 
appears in Todd's work as well, which, as Todd 
says, seeks to claim the screen for Native sto- 
ries and develop a filmic language that com- 
municates those stories to a wide audience. 

Support for Native filmmakers is still scarce 
in both Canada and America, though there are 
clearly new generations of talented makers 
ready to create work. Todd says she was recent- 
ly described by a Canadian broadcaster, with 
whom she did not see eye-to-eye, as being "too 
arty and tot) Native." With attitudes like that 
and despite her successes, it is clear that it is 
still an uphill battle to bring Native voices to 
film and television. For now, Todd is working 
on a feature film script and continuing her doc- 
umentary work, always asking, "Who are the 
people that I know? What is it that we do, that 
we care about, that we believe in?" 

Cara Mertes is a producer, teacher, and writer in 
New York City. 



14 THE INDEPENDENT May 1999 



Ktixwo you? 

Come to RADICAL AVID for 
the LOWEST PRICES in New York! 

RAJU&£A»AyiD 




1133 Broadway at 26th Street 
(212) 633-7497 



All Systems MC 7.0 PCI 
Off Line/On Line /AVR 77 



Spacious 24 Hr. Editing Suites 

• Dubs to and from DV, miniDV, Beta, 3/4, VHS w/tc windows 

• Highest Quality COMPONENT In/Output DV and miniDV 

• Batch digitize directly from DV and miniDV 

No More Beta Bump-Ups! 



DV • miniDV • DV • miniDV • DV • miniDV • DV 




SPLASH 

STUDIOS 










DIGITAL AUDIO POST 
2 1 2 • 27 1 • 8747 



DIALOG, FX EDITING ADR & FOLEY RECORDING 

168 5th Ave. ,5th floor N.W. New York N.Y. 10010 
Fax: (212) 271- 8748 e-mail: bplprod@aol.com 



^* 



HAlKZi 



€veriithirig far 
Past -PrDductiaa 

FULL LABORATORY S€RVIC€S 

T€L€Cin€ 

€DITORIAL 

Past Prad, Supervisors 

Dailies Sunning 

€dge Coding 

Film €diting 

Digital nonlinear 
Flatbed 

Assistant €diting 

On-Line €diting 

€quipment Rental 
SP€CIAL €FF€CTS 

Digital/Optical 
SOUOD 

Design 

€diting 

€ffects 

Foleu 

ADR 

mixing 

Sweetening 

Transfers 
1/4" to' 
DAT to 
fTlag. tol 

music 

Composing 

Recording 

€diting 

Libraru 
VID€0 DUBBin< 
TITL€S & CR€I 
n€QATIV€ CI 
VID€0 TO FII 
DIGITAL 



UJe are an independent Group 

of Businesses that make uour 

Post Production nightmare a 

DR€ Am 



For more Information call 




IVAL CIRCUIT 



Total Film 

The International Film Festival Rotterdam & CineMart 




by Paul Power 

In the early seventies, as a film festival was 
in the process of getting started in Holland's 
second-largest city, the Dutch were already 
making their presence telt on another stage. In 
the theater of sport, the national team coined a 
new term for the type of fluid, versatile soccer 
that was being displayed by the likes of Cryuff, 
Neeskens, and Rep: Total Football. Twenty- 
eight years later, as the curtain fell on the 
International Film Festival Rotterdam (January 
27-February 6), one had the sense of having 
been at the center of an event that touched on 
almost every issue in contemporary cinema. If 
ever a festival deserved the title, Rotterdam is 
Total Film. 

Besides the festival's 120-plus films, which 
were divided into several categories that 
included work from developing nations 
(Hubert Bals Fund sidebar), a 14-film competi- 
tive section (Tiger Awards), critics' choice, 
Thai crime, digital new wave, and post- 
Glasnost sidebars, this year offered a strong dig- 
ital and multimedia section entitled Exploding 



Cinema/Melting Media. And coursing for three 
frenetic days through the festival, in tandem 
with the main program, was the 10th edition of 
its well-respected co-production market, 
CineMart (February 1-3). 

As the first major European festival of the 
calendar year and coming hot on the heels of 
Sundance, Rotterdam is a vital stop for many 
filmmakers who have spent the winter in hiber- 
nation honing their films, trailers, scripts, or 
pitches. (It was possible to pick out haggard 
refugees from Park City, the bravest of whom 
were even heading on to Berlin the following 
week.) The festival proper has earned a reputa- 
tion tor screening work that is daring, edgy, and 
bold (see sidebar on the prevalence of sexually 
explicit films), with a traditionally strong selec- 
tion of new Asian cinema — a result of the fes- 
tival's strong links with filmmakers and festivals 
from that continent, and particularly with the 
Pusan Production Project in South Korea. 
(This year, however, apart from the Thai crime 
films, the festival came up short in the Asian 
department, and there was a more definite 



Eurocentric slant to the programming.) 

With new festivals popping up like crocuses, 
more established festivals are now adding mar- 
kets to their repertoire, but Rotterdam's long- 
established CineMart (est. 1984) is an impor- 
tant step on the Euro circuit for a number of 
reasons. The CineMart has already spawned 
markets at festivals in Sarajevo, New York's 
Independent Feature Film 
Market's 'No Borders' sec- 
tion, and at Pusan, one of 
the most important co- 
financing markets in the 
Pacific Rim. And indeed 
the CineMart has a long 
association with U.S. pro- 
jects. Since 1995, the 
IFFM's No Borders sec- 
tion has sent projects to 
Rotterdam with a view to 
aligning U.S. producers 
with European financiers 
or, at the very least, with 
co-production partners 
from which relationships 
can be fostered to collabo- 
rate on future projects. 
CineMart's international 
advisory board makes sug- 
gestions to Ido Abram, 
CineMart director, for 
inclusion in the 40-pro- 
ject market. 
With international festi- 
val buying fever of recent years very much a 
thing of the past, buyers are now far more cir- 
cumspect about shelling out eight and even 
seven figure sums for projects. Markets are 
coming more and more into their own, where 
there is the time to consider and reconsider 
projects, requirements, terms, and conditions. 
Even with that, Abram notes that 85% of 
CineMart projects have gone into production 
within two years of the market. Indeed, by the 
end of this year's market, Abrams had identi- 
fied at least eight projects that had obtained 
funding, commitments for funding, or near- 
complete funding. 

Producer Julia Reichert, who travelled to the 
market with Transparent Films partner Ed 
Radtke and an eight-minute trailer for Radtke's 
The Dream Catcher, was part of the U.S. pres- 
ence at the CineMart. "We learned a huge 
amount at the market," says Reichert. "We 
especially learned about the global market- 
place, which is something we tend to forget 
about in this country. And as regional filmmak- 
ers, being at the market made so much differ- 



16 THE INDEPENDENT May 1999 



sex with a capital S 

Perhaps it's a fin de siecle phenomenon, mir- ing the envelope of i 

roring the veiled permissiveness that perme- ripping point. The 

ated late -Victorian society a hundred years character, on the n 

ago, and perhaps it's just coincidence, but apartment with Mai 

there was a lot ofpulsatin' flesh on screen this lugubrious lines anc 

year. Here's a selection of Rotterdam's sidebar while trying to thro 

of fleshpots: may have seemed p 

transpires through tl 
brilliant imagery, ho' 

Anyone unfamiliar with the work of rom P apparently ins 

Catherine Breillat (myself included) might the Semes ( which is : 
have been taken aback by the frank sexuality 
in this, her most recent feature. Marie 

(Caroline Ducey), a young teacher, embarks Belgian Guido Hen 

on a sexual odyssey since her boyfriend is subject of his four 

unable and unwilling to have sex with her. dancer S. (Natali Br 

Throughout it all, Marie ruminates via inter- parents (estranged m 

nal monologue on her progressive sexual sive father sends di 

degradation (which includes a drawn-out jail) who murders he 

bondage relationship with an older male col- girl in New York and 

league, and .more casual sexual encounters) , she embarks on a i 

while retaining a sense of ennui about the and cuts a swathe 

entire sequence of events. There's an eerily through any kind o; 

calm feel to the film but the gratuitousness of that get in her way. 

another anal rape scene (there's also one in from Broods gets the 

S.) begs the question: would a male director predictability and th 

have been able to stand by a similar work and become apparent am 
not be pilloried? Casting Italian porn star 
Rocco Siffredi in a key and sexually graphic 



m ^ g 0^ stars came in handy 

Ult CU ^% tor Kerkhofs heavy- 
handed stylistic push- 
ing the envelope of sexual explicitness to the 
ripping point. The premise that Hoffman's 
character, on the run and holed up in an 
apartment with Mai where she listens to his 
lugubrious lines and they have a lot of sex 
while trying to throw the mob off his trail, 
may have seemed promising enough. What 
transpires through the erratic and sometimes 
brilliant imagery, however, is a self-indulgent 
romp apparently inspired by In the Realm of 
the Senses (which is also Breillat's lodestone) . 




The other cheek: 
Caroline Ducey 
in Catherine 
Breillat's 
Romance 



part (a decision Breillat kept from her cast 
and crew by giving him an alias on the call 
sheet, lest there be any walkouts in protest) 
lends an air of porno legitimacy to a tale of 
amour fou whose sensibilities are, beneath it 
all, quite avowedly cerebral. 

Shabondama Elegy 

Part of the Digital New Wave sidebar, 
Dutchman Ian Kerkhofs tale of doomed love 
is effectively a two-hander, so to speak, fea- 
turing Thorn Hoffman and Hoshino Mai. 
Mai's day job as one of Japan's leading porn 



Belgian Guido Henderickx chooses as the 
subject of his fourth feature a peepshow 
dancer S. (Natali Broods) with dysfunctional 
parents (estranged mother still a hooker; abu- 
sive father sends daughter videotapes from 
jail) who murders her cheating lo